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Lockridge Device - Peter Lindemann

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  • phil.g
    replied
    I await your posts with bated breath... Is the "regenerative electric motor" discussed in the Electric Motor Secrets Part 1 DVD?

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  • Peter Lindemann
    replied
    Next 48 Hours

    Hi folks,

    In the next 48 hours, I hope to post 3 separate posts. The first will discuss the necessary elements of a modern, regenerative electric motor. The second one will discuss the operations of a standard, commutated DC motor, and the third will discuss the modifications needed to make to the standard motor so that it will operate like the regenerative type.

    It's going to take a bit of time to write all of this out, but I hope to have it all posted by the weekend.

    Peter

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  • twoody01
    replied
    comutator options.

    My dc motor arrived and there is a note about a pulse generator that can be attached to the back end of the shaft and it will produce a 5 volt dc pulse once per revolution. Could this be used as the comutator? Would be easy to attach and if you where using a pulley from starter motor to generator you could play with changing the pulley sizes to vary the pluse to the motor. One of my concerns was pulsing the starter at the same place on the rotor and causing excess ware.


    PulseGenerator, 1 Pulse/Rev, 4.5 to 24 VDC - Pulse Generators - Motor Supplies - Motors : Grainger Industrial Supply
    Attached Files

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  • dragon
    replied
    @Peter... I remember reading in another thread - can't seem to locate it - you mentioned briefly about reducing the Lenz effect by adding a diode to block the current upon entry of the magnetic field then utilizing the collapsing field in a generator.

    I'd like to set up an experimental unit where input and output could be measured. It seems to me that the poles passing the coils would need to be arranged in one polarity ( all north or all south ) for this to work properly is this the case?

    I'd like to eventually set up a motor/flywheel/generator consolidated into one wheel - the flywheel. I have an idea for an enhanced torque motor ( built a long time ago ) which, at the time, had multiple failures and problems and you inadvertently solved it for me... so I pulled it off the shelf for a refitting. I actually have 2 of them, one large unit with a 60lb flywheel and a small one with a 10lb flywheel.

    Still moving forward with the design and idea's with small distractions along the way....

    Thanks so much for all your help !
    ________
    Child wellbutrin
    Last edited by dragon; 05-11-2011, 11:13 AM.

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  • mbrownn
    replied
    Forgive me for posting on this thread before I have seen your 2nd electric motor secrets.

    On the rotor of the lockridge device is it possible that the windings run from the comutator to the rotor shaft so that the rotor is pulsed in parallel to the stator windings, sort of a y configuration?

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  • dragon
    replied
    Hi twoody01, I used 1 inch id bearings on both ends ( 2" od ). on the front I made an adaptor sleeve to fit the shaft and pressed into the bearing. On the rear I machined a 1" shaft to press fit over the existing shaft which gave me an extention outside the motor about 2 inches for the comutator.
    ________
    HAIR PROBLEMS ADVICE
    Last edited by dragon; 05-11-2011, 11:13 AM.

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  • twoody01
    replied
    Changes made to starter motor.

    [QUOTE=dragon;124306]Hi Mark,
    I ran into a snag with the starter motor causing excess losses. 100 watts worth.

    Dragon

    Your build looks great.

    If you could be so kind to give some insight into the rotor changes you made to accept the end bearings. On my rotor shaft both ends are between standard bearing ID sizes. Did you reduce the shaft size or machine a sleeve to bring it to the next larger bearing size? I was thinking of having the shop reduce the larger side but am hesitant to reduce the small end.

    I donít have a way to make the end plats and have to take the motor to a shop. I think every starter motor will be different due to there age and how many times they have been rebuilt.

    Your insite would be greatly Appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • dragon
    replied
    Hi Mark,
    I ran into a snag with the starter motor causing excess losses. 100 watts worth. I've spent the last couple days trying to track down the problem. A portion, a significant portion I suspect, of those losses was my own fault as the shaft adaptor bore had an 8 thou run out... causing a wobble. When it's all tightened down in the frame it wants to flex the frame because of it.... I'm working in an 11 degree shop, in my haste to "get it done and get warm" I didn't check the bore and just assembled it. I'm still moving forward ( with 2 steps back ).

    It would be nice to see this working - I could put the light bulbs in my pocket to keep me warm in the shop.... ;O)
    ________
    Breakup advice forums
    Last edited by dragon; 05-11-2011, 11:12 AM.

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  • Mark
    replied
    Hey Dragon and Goreggie,

    Any progress or problems to report on your builds yet? I'm interested on any updates either of you can provide.

    Mark

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  • everwiser
    replied
    Originally posted by emfimp View Post
    Thanks for the reply everwiser - it was worth a shot!
    No problem. My failed attempt to supplement the air flow to the upstairs rooms was just in the last month or two so it was fresh on my mind. The new blower motors are a lot more efficient as they typically maintain 80% efficiency for any/all of their programmed speeds whereas the standard squirrel cage induction motors' efficiencies drop considerably lower (50% or lower) once you're outside their sweet spots.

    The gripe of it is that the newer motors are not user configurable unless they were programmed with multiple speed/torque curves from the manufacturer. The one I have is similar to this: Genteq Motors - X13 - Improved High Static CFM Performance Motors are Pre-Programmed by the OEM. Since it didn't work for me in the house (house duct issue; not motor related) I'm hoping to use it in my garage on those days I need some airflow.

    Leave a comment:


  • emfimp
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark View Post
    Maybe I'm the one that missed it. The way I'm looking at it is that the motor will be running at somewhere between 50 to 80% of its rated speed and looking at the torque figure. I see how your looking at it. I guess only testing will tell the whole story.
    Ah, I see - I guess I could have been more clear as to how I was looking at it. Sounds like you've already got it, but I'm looking at it like % back emf (like Peter was mentioning in the vid), instead of % speed. So we are trying to operate at 10 times (minimum) the rated voltage (120 volts+ for a 12 volt motor) - so for every one unit of bemf (12 volts, say) we have 9 units of energy creating torque for us (120 - 12 = 108v, 108 divided by 12 = 9)

    Therefore we are running @ 10% bemf or lower (say 5 - 10%), so I am looking at the torque around the graph's 10 - 20% rated speed area. (remember that 100% rated speed is where the bemf = 50% of the rated input voltage, so 5 - 10% bemf happens around 10 - 20% rated speed)

    Strange thing is that this should mean that the excess torque hits zero at about 200% of the rated speed. The series motor chart does this, but not the permanent magnet or shunt motor chart.

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  • Mark
    replied
    Originally posted by emfimp View Post
    I'm not sure I follow, Mark. Yes, the scales are different, but the fact remains the series motor shows the highest available torque (as a percentage of the 100% rated torque) when back emf is the lowest. (which is when speed is close to zero) Did I miss something?
    Maybe I'm the one that missed it. The way I'm looking at it is that the motor will be running at somewhere between 50 to 80% of its rated speed and looking at the torque figure. I see how your looking at it. I guess only testing will tell the whole story.

    Leave a comment:


  • emfimp
    replied
    Thanks for the reply everwiser - it was worth a shot!

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  • emfimp
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark View Post
    emfimp

    You might want to go back and study the 3 graphs again. The scales were not the same on all 3. Pick out different settings and compare them on all 3 graphs.

    Mark
    I'm not sure I follow, Mark. Yes, the scales are different, but the fact remains the series motor shows the highest available torque (as a percentage of the 100% rated torque) when back emf is the lowest. (which is when speed is close to zero) Did I miss something?

    Leave a comment:


  • everwiser
    replied
    Originally posted by emfimp View Post
    Anybody out there have one of those newer high efficiency furnaces? I'm told they have a dc motor in them, and that they are insanely cheap to operate, as far as the electricity consumed. (something like $50 per year, running them 24 hours a day, every day of the year)

    It'd be neat to put a scope on one of these - they may encompass the very idea that we're all talking about on this thread. Torque enhancement off the shelf!
    I have a blower from one of the newer furnaces. It's 240VAC but the controller in the motor converts it to PWM DC for running in constant torque mode. I bought it for a (failed) air circulation issue in my home. It's runs at around 5 amps when a similarly sized induction squirrel cage blower motor would require around 10-12 amps. It uses less power but if you ran it 24/7 it alone would cost more than $50 a year. It'd likely be more than $50 every other month to run continuously. There is no industry supplied silver bullet when it comes to heating...

    Leave a comment:

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