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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Originally posted by BobFrench View Post
    Hello, I am posting this off-topic video because I thought that somebody might like it. My apologies if that is not so.

    https://youtu.be/oa1g0StQWDs

    Bob
    Hi Bob
    You are more than welcome to post anything you like.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobFrench
    replied
    Pendulum

    Hello, I am posting this off-topic video because I thought that somebody might like it. My apologies if that is not so.

    https://youtu.be/oa1g0StQWDs

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • BroMikey
    replied
    Nice test setup. Do you think he is getting OU?

    Leave a comment:


  • Rakarskiy
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjdquk-LLSI

    Leave a comment:


  • BroMikey
    replied

    Okay here is their page for "Ferrites for electronics" not just any iron
    dust. https://www.pptechnology.com/PPT%20F...e%20(2016).pdf

    I will contact them so I have something good. Do you remember if they
    require a bulk order or how much you had to pay? Sometimes you may
    get samples from companies.

    These Ferrites are made of nickel and zinc and iron dust. All 3 components
    are proportioned for any freq range needed.
    Last edited by BroMikey; 12-20-2019, 06:58 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Turion
    replied
    Pick your poison

    https://www.pptechnology.com/electro...e-powders.html

    Leave a comment:


  • BroMikey
    replied
    Originally posted by Turion View Post
    I got a second coil wound today........

    Got a couple bags of ferrite, ...

    You want stuff for your core between 200 and 400 microns.

    Turns out that with 6 north magnets and six south magnets on the
    rotor you multiply SIX times the 1100 RPM and divide by 120 to get
    the Hz.

    So the big machine is doing about 57 Hz.
    Hi Dave
    Glad you are feeling better and keeping busy on the project. It is
    imperative that motors AND generators fundamentally be advanced.
    Since you are one of many who have the experience seems like you
    will continue the work by delegation.

    I am sure your machinists is a great guy plus very smart. He is a
    reserved man which makes him a listener. Anyone who can listen
    properly can run the whole show. Nice going.

    Concerning the calculations you have posted. It is a rule of thumb or
    a number that works out well I am sure based on the diameter of this
    specific build. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlK-Usd1tBM
    We could go on and on about how many micro-seconds
    it takes 1 magnet to pass a pole at the said RPM which equates to the
    distance around the circle it travels then how many times it does that
    in 1 minute or second. Picking the easy numbers to approximate is more
    fun. Math has more than one avenue to arrive at the same place.

    On the Ferrite. I know you said this before and for some reason all the
    stuff I order now is nano iron dust like you put in caulk broad paint to
    make it magnetic also. Point me to a supplier so I can compare dust.

    I know sizes change everything
    Last edited by BroMikey; 12-19-2019, 11:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bistander
    replied
    Bad math

    Originally posted by Turion View Post
    ...
    Turns out that with 6 north magnets and six south magnets on the rotor you multiply SIX times the 1100 RPM and divide by 120 to get the Hz. So the big machine is doing about 57 Hz. Since the coil output seems to still be 120 volts, heís going to try running that AC motor on the coil output and if it works, replace the DC motor. Heís keeping me informed.
    1100 RPM with 6 pole-pairs gives 110 Hz.

    bi

    Leave a comment:


  • Turion
    replied
    Progress

    I got a second coil wound today, but I can’t find the filters to filter the ferrite. I only had enough filtered ferrite Matt sent me to do one coil. Got a couple bags of ferrite, just not filtered. You need a 200 micron and a 400 micron filter. You want stuff for your core between 200 and 400 microns. I also ordered 2 1/16” thick plastic plates so I can epoxy one on each side of the rotor. They will have holes where the magnets go so the magnets don’t stick out. Lots of little things to fix as I put this smaller machine back together, and my machinist is over at the independent labs today, getting some help with the bigger machine. So this won't be a speedy assembly, but it WILL get done.

    Turns out that with 6 north magnets and six south magnets on the rotor you multiply SIX times the 1100 RPM and divide by 120 to get the Hz. So the big machine is doing about 57 Hz. Since the coil output seems to still be 120 volts, he’s going to try running that AC motor on the coil output and if it works, replace the DC motor. He’s keeping me informed.
    Last edited by Turion; 12-19-2019, 04:33 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Turion
    replied
    Production

    What affects the output of the generator?
    Capacity of the coil
    RPM of rotor
    Number of magnets on the rotor
    Mass of the magnets
    Strength of the magnets
    Core material
    Size of the core.

    What is the perfect rotor/coil combination? WE DONíT KNOW!

    I ASSUME Thane isnít getting as much out of his little coils as I am getting out of my bigger ones. But what is he using as his core material in his coils? What strength are his magnets? He has TWICE as many on his rotor, so THAT makes a big difference for sure. They may also be thicker, which I KNOW makes a big difference. We need to know how thick the magnets need to be before the added mass is just wasted because you have exceeded the capacitance of the coil. There is a TON of research to be done here and one or two people canít do it all. This is a viable method of producing free energy. It is no longer the one I want to focus on, but that doesnít make it any less real.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Turion
    replied
    My machine currently has iron cores. I just wound my FIRST coil that has a ferrite core today to try it out. I havenít changed the size or amount of wire much on my machine at all. I started with 3 strands of 1000 feet. I went downtown 800 feet to bring the output down to 120 volts instead of 130, but now I am back at 12 strands of 253 feet, which gives me 18 inches of wire on each end to make connections. And still around 3,000 feet of wire on the coil.

    The speed up under load at the lower RPM is a matter of the number of strands in parallel connected in series. I wouldnít be surprised if 24 strands allowed you to go to an even lower RPM. The output of the coil SEEMS to remain the same, despite the lower RPM, which I believe is a result of the increased capacitance of the coil.

    I will probably wind one more ferrite core coil tomorrow so I have a ďpairĒ to test. It may take me a couple days to get that wound and the testing done. I took yesterday and today off from me remodeling project because of a bad sore throat, but need to get back at it tomorrow.

    No word from my machinist on testing with new batteries, but I will probably hear from him tomorrow.

    Leave a comment:


  • BroMikey
    replied
    BTW Dave

    Thane is using smaller coils now and they speed up under load(Not really)
    or don't drag down the rotor. He is using 24 magnets on what look
    like a 14"-15" rotor. At 3000rmp his tiny coils still do a good job
    (2nd gen wire) but because he has so many magnets..........

    Leave a comment:


  • BroMikey
    replied
    I am thinking your machinist is making parts and you are sending
    him coils with ferrite cores in them. Or is he winding his own and uses
    iron cores?

    Yes having such a machine operating at the lower rpm would be amazing.



    Originally posted by Turion View Post
    Iíll report back .................

    I am very hopeful that simply by increasing the number of strands in
    parallel I can wind even a ferrite core in such a way that it speeds up
    under load. And THAT would be amazing.

    Leave a comment:


  • bistander
    replied
    Continued

    Most switchmode power supplies, AC to DC, accept wide range of AC voltage input like 80-260 and wide range of frequency from 0 to 400Hz(?). I've seen those for bigger computer equipment and battery chargers in the 7-8 amp DC range at 5 to 48V. Might work.

    Good luck with it.

    bi

    Leave a comment:


  • bistander
    replied
    Treadmill motor

    Most treadmill motors I've seen are DCPM commutator types and will not run on AC.

    Risking being blamed when your loop fails, to convert AC to DC, use a bridge rectifier (fwbr) and filter capacitor. To adjust voltage, use a transformer (or variac) on AC side, or DC/DC converter on DC side.

    bi

    Leave a comment:

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