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Renewable Energy Discussion on various alternative energy, renewable energy, & free energy technologies. Also any discussion about the environment, global warming, and other related topics are welcome here.

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Old 09-16-2009, 12:30 AM
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Aaron Aaron is offline
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Peter Lindemann Cash Flow Radio Show Interview

Here is an interview of Peter Lindemann by James Martinez of the popular
Cash Flow radio show in the Bay Area from a couple weeks ago.

Achieve Radio Archive Vault playing Cash Flow from Aug 20, 2009 at 12:00PM
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Old 09-16-2009, 04:09 AM
dmonarch dmonarch is offline
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Excellent Interview

Thanks heaps for posting that aaron, and thanks to peter for doing it. What you talked about is exactly what i have been pondering for a while now. Have you any other interviews i can listen to.
For those in ausi interested in the paint peter talks about just done did a quick search and here in Ausi it is easy to purchase as an aditive from the local hardware store. Heres a link
Paint, House Paint, Exterior Paint -Thermilate Australia
Cheers
Damian

Last edited by dmonarch : 09-16-2009 at 04:14 AM.
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Old 09-16-2009, 06:07 AM
dmonarch dmonarch is offline
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Packed Brick

Hi peter can you please tell me what the chemical is that is added to the clay which makes it hydrophobic.
Cheers
Damian
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Old 09-16-2009, 06:48 AM
Peter Lindemann Peter Lindemann is offline
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One Example

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Originally Posted by dmonarch View Post
Hi peter can you please tell me what the chemical is that is added to the clay which makes it hydrophobic.
Cheers
Damian
Damian,

No problem. One company that makes the equipment to produce "compressed earth bricks" is: AdobeMachine.Com - Compressed Earth Block Technology For The World

Also, another company that makes clay stabilizers is: EarthZyme

On the pages for EarthZyme, there is an MSDS sheet that lists ingredients.

Another system is sold by the RoadPacker Group at: Stabilized Earth Brick Technology, Global Providers - Low Cost Housing International - Home

I hope this helps.

Glad you liked the interview!!

Peter

Last edited by Peter Lindemann : 09-16-2009 at 05:49 PM.
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Old 09-17-2009, 08:27 AM
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sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Interesting interview

Never know that compressed earth may not need to be burned if we apply chemical. Thanks .

I search around and found this site:
basin - building advisory service and information network

Some interesting file is:
Basics of Compressed Earth Blocks, The booklet briefly compares compressed earth blocks (CEBs) with various other common earth construction techniques, outlines the main advantages and disadvantages, describes the production process, the necessary equipment and steps required to set up a production unit, and deals with the main economic aspects of CEB production. Various other aspects, such as vocational training, management, marketing and building design are also briefly outlined.

Compressed Earth Blocks Volume II: Manual of Design and Construction, Designed with the intention of widely disseminating theoretical knowledge as well as practical skills, a large part of the book is devoted to practical examples of construction techniques and architectural design.

There are other interesting file too for anyone want to build home.



About insulating home with material containing micro vacuum bubble, I am surprise! I thought you guys already incorporating vacuum on any insulation since I read it on some architectural book that windows on the west will have vacuum insulation and mentioned vacuum give nice insulation to heat.

It always hot here, the old way to cool the house are also abandoned even when it is very effective. The way is to allow air to circulate between the ceiling and the roof. Sicne hot air is not trapped in between, it goes up and not transfer heat from the roof to the room.

Last edited by sucahyo : 09-18-2009 at 03:53 AM.
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Old 09-22-2009, 04:33 AM
sykavy sykavy is offline
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Nice job Peter

Sounds very practical. I look forward to purchasing your book. Is it on your websites?

Last edited by sykavy : 09-24-2009 at 11:46 PM.
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Old 09-23-2009, 02:07 PM
DavidE DavidE is offline
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Interesting Radio Show

Peter

The key to real insulation value are hydrophobic products and materials that dampen any conduction of energy flows driven by environmental variation of energy (temperatures).

We have done extensive research in this field.

R-Values and current construction codes are all about maintaining status quo.

We discovered that typical R-Values are determined in a test chamber "absent" of moisture. In fact the specific test procedure (hot box) calls for removing any moisture. Heat transfer is then measured.

Check this out. Measure the value of resistance to energy flow with varying amounts of moisture in the same apparatus. What you will learn is that non-hydrophobic products lose their efficiency to dampen flows relative to the amount of moisture present. To the point -- relative humidity degradation of REAL r-value are close to the amount of moisture present. 90% moisture present, diminishes real resistance to flow by virtually the same amount. Which means -- effectiveness is close to only 10% of the published value.

We discovered this by testing hydrophobic products next to non-hydrophobic products. The true R-value that you can count on of non-hydrophobic products is relative to varying amounts of driven moisture from inside and outside the structure.

How did we come to this knowledge? We designed and built 20 million dollars of high end residential structures that gave us a free hand from specifying materials all of the way to certifying performance results (through high tech testing) as a process of design. All of these homes only required 2" of insulation (certain kind) in the walls and 3" in the roof. The material we used had an R-value of R14/R21 respectively. Obviously, not all R-Values are created equally.

These homes tested and performed to levels never before seen in residential construction. They also excelled in indoor air quality and required minimal maintenance to produce the same effects over long periods of times. Get the fundamentals right, this may be anybodys result.

If at any point you would like to discuss this further PM me. I am retired from the field of construction, but would be willing to share any knowledge that can advance your cause.

David
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Old 09-23-2009, 03:32 PM
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Shamus Shamus is offline
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Hi David,

This is of interest to me as I'm preparing to build a new house. I was planning on using 6" thick structural insulated panels; how does this insulation compare? Does it use the same concept as SIPs?
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Old 09-23-2009, 06:56 PM
DavidE DavidE is offline
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Shamus

Quote:
This is of interest to me as I'm preparing to build a new house. I was planning on using 6" thick structural insulated panels; how does this insulation compare? Does it use the same concept as SIPs?
First. I believe this thread was posted by Aaron and was to make people aware of the valuable information available through Peter Lindemann at his website. Peter is way ahead of most in the narratives he shares. Most anything that Peter does is worth the price of admission.

On the open forum I will just share a few points that you may find helpful. If you would like me to be more specific, PM me the state and city where you intend to build. The design must consider the range of conditions throughout a typical year. Like temperature variation, humidity variation, solar forces, wind forces, etc. From those basic factors I can suggest how to approach design of your home to make it work to "standards."

The standards we designed to were COMFORT, ENERGY EFFICIENCY and HEALTH. We found to recurrently produce these conditions we had to consider the whole home as a system. If not, one component may perform 150% above norm, but another -300% (i.e. high wind environments). Producing negative net effects.

COMFORT - Plus or minus two degrees from setpoint anywhere in the structure. Regardless if it is -20F outside or +100F. Regardless if the wind is blowing at 5 mph or 40 mph. The objective is to capture mass, done well this mass radiates even temperature - floor, walls, ceilings. Just like a mothers womb. If you can minimize variation, you can minimize feedback of all of the temperature sensing cells in your body. This makes your brain quite happy.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY - To a large degree this is the result of the sum efficiency of the thermal shell throughout the range of environmental conditions. And the efficiency of the delivery (furnace etc) and control system system (sensing systems). The wider the variation of temperatures, the greater the potential for ROI.

HEALTH - The most important part of a home is its capacity to preserve a high quality of life. The air is always teaming with countless varieties of molds, fungi, bacterias and even offgassing of household chemicals. Managing the qualities of air inside while managing humidity here is key. There is a corridor of health in this regard. You don't want to produce conditions that produce either extreme. Mitigation of mold, must always be a top concern. Even large amounts of harmless strains can produce serious health effects in people.

You mention SIPS. We have utilized them in many cases.

PROS: SIPS minimize the thermal bridging or conduction points that would be typical in a stud frame structure. If you purchase closed cell foam SIPS then you have a material that will likely perform over long periods of time reliably. While you may be able to raise your wall and roof integrity with this single material, for comprehensive performance you still need to address other areas like floor systems, foundation, windows, air infiltration, venting, mechancial systems etc.

CONS: Even though many SIPS are treated with substances to repel insects, they still seem to attract and house higher than normal colonies of pests. Because most of the densities of foams are relatively low, most insects can carve out their own new condo... and all the while invite friends. Obviously infestation over time, removes the insulation value because the foam beads are normally expelled from the nest to make room for family and friends.

More insulation is not necessarily better. Unless of course its free. There is a diminishing point of return for real world R-values. R-Values that you can count on regardless of moisture or heat/cold variation.
In the lab (and in the field), we found data that suggest R14-16 in walls, R20-23 in roofs. We found in some cases you could double the insulation (which doubled the cost) but increased the efficiency of the system by a negligable factor (less than 5%).

The real challenge you face in the field, is finding materials/applications that local construction code officials will allow. They are only responsible for one thing, enforcing the code. The code has no performance promise.

David

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Old 09-23-2009, 07:51 PM
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Aaron Aaron is offline
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Save on Home Energy

Quote:
Originally Posted by sykavy View Post
Nice job Peter

Sounds very practical. I look forward to purchasing our book. Is it on your websites?
Hi Sykavy, the book is available here:
http://www.save-on-home-energy.com/energetic
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