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  #1  
Old 05-03-2009, 07:58 AM
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rickoff rickoff is offline
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"RICK'S PIPE DREAM" Magnetic Motor-Generator

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A pipe dream is a fantastic hope or plan that is generally regarded as being nearly impossible to achieve. - Wikipedia
Hi folks,

I thought that "Rick's Pipe Dream" would be a very appropriate title for this thread for the following 2 reasons:
1. As seen in the above quote, the reality of a useful magnetic motor -generator has been something that has eluded mankind to this point in time. Inventors come, and inventors go, and along the way there have been several inventors who have promised to show us a working magnetic motor. At least one of these inventors (Howard Johnson) was successful at obtaining a patent for his ideas (US Patent # 4,151,431). He filed the patent application in 1973, and it was finally granted on April 24, 1979 - some 6 years later. But wait a minute - why is it that his magnetic motor never went to manufacture? Why is it that, 30 years later, each and every one of us does not have a Howard Johnson motor-generator powering our homestead? To most logical thinkers, it would seem that perhaps Howard Johnson's ideas just didn't pan out. His ideas had to work, or he would not have been granted a patent. But did he ever build a working magnetic motor that could be considered powerful enough to serve a truly useful purpose? Some say yes, and claim to have seen such a machine, but then where is it? If the claims are true, then it would seem that his great invention has been purposely kept from us by those interests who seek to suppress inventors and inventions which are capable of bringing about significant change that threatens the status quo. What the case may actually be is really anyone's guess at this point in time, and Howard Johnson is now dead and gone. He wrote a nice book titled "The Secret World of Magnets," before dying, and that does have some interesting theory and photos in it, but no photo of a magnetic motor-generator. So what are we to think? In looking over his patent drawings, his concepts seem to be very capable of working, but we have all been told time and again that no one has ever been able to build a working motor-generator using the patent information. That may have changed recently, though, when an experimenter calling himself "MYLOW" began posting videos of a purported Howard Johnson magnetic motor replication on YouTube. For those who aren't yet familiar with those experiments, you will find 2 or 3 threads here if you do a search on the name "MYLOW." There is also an open source project for the MYLOW motor at Peswiki. Mylow seems like your "average Joe" type of guy, and comes across as being sincere, but there has been so much negativity surrounding his videos that he appears ready to give up. He also claims that he was threatened by government agents, and told to stop what he has been doing. Well, I for one think that Mylow's videos may be factual. I can not say for certain that they were the real thing, because I have not had the opportunity to personally inspect his build. For that matter, it seems that no one else has either. Peter Lindemann reported that Sterling Allan had travelled to MYLOW's location hoping to see the motor firsthand, but that he was given some excuse as to why Mylow could not show the motor at that time. (see http://www.energeticforum.com/52959-post5.html for more info). Many people, including Dr. Lindemann, now believe that MYLOW's magnetic motor is a hoax. Several people have attempted to replicate MYLOW's build, but apparently with no success at achieving continuous rotation. MYLOW did his best to show that there is nothing driving his rotor other than the magnetic forces, but the object of complaint and skepticism heard from most observers is the hefty column base that houses a bearing and who knows what else. Viewers are suggesting that there is a battery and electric motor inside the base column, and of course that is possible. The rotation starts off very slowly, and is only 80 rpm at top speed, so this action is what one would expect of a small motor. To make matters worse, MYLOW has now posted a video showing a small turntable that does rotate using an electric motor (see YouTube - (NEW VIDEO #12) Projectmagma (Mylow) Magnet Motor ). Quite unfortunate that MYLOW has not had his build authenticated. What is fortunate, though, is that Howard Johnson's patent is long expired, which means that anyone can now build motors based on his concepts.

What I hope to show in this thread is that it is, in fact, possible to build a useful magnetic motor using Howard Johnson's principles of operation. I will be doing so in a build that is totally different than MYLOW's setup, and I will thoroughly document every step of my build in such a way as to make it very easy for anyone to replicate what I have done. I will list all materials used, and their sizes and specifications. My build will be made entirely with materials readily available, rather than with the obscure and unavailable parts as used by MYLOW. Many of the parts will be found locally at any hardware store or building supply. I have intentionally designed my build for ease of construction, using simple tools that many homeowners, hobbyists, and back yard mechanics already have on hand. The unit will be light weight, yet strong and durable. With care, it will last a lifetime. The design is fully open and revealing, and when I show photos and video of it there will be absolutely no question as to what makes it work.
2. The other reason that I chose the title, "RICK'S PIPE DREAM," will become apparent when you view my next post.

Seeing will be believing, if I am successful. If anyone has negative thoughts or comments in mind, please don't post them here. Save those for a different thread. I will only respond to those who are genuinely interested in pursuing a replication of my build. I have already spent a great deal of time in designing and building my prototype, and I am presenting this here as an open source project with full permission to duplicate my build. I willl show you how do do it, step by step, with absolutely nothing left unanswered. So before you start asking a lot of questions that will end up slowing my progress, please just be patient. I will post a new construction step each day, which will allow you time to build what I have shown before moving to the next step. In a week or less, if you choose to build this, your magnetic motor will be completed. I can't promise that yours will work, because you may not build it correctly. But if you take reasonable care to duplicate the details precisely as I lay them out for you, I do believe that you will be very happy with your results. I have already done some preliminary tests with various magnets which show great promise, and I am currently nearing completion of my build. I expect to receive a shipment of magnets tomorrow, and after installing them I will present some compelling video that should quell the thoughts of any would-be skeptic. So please bear with me, be courteous and respectful in any posts that you make here, and above all please do not attempt to steer this topic off course with talk about other builds or builders. I sincerely thank you for your interest in my project, and for any polite comments that you wish to offer. Many of you have said that you enjoyed reading other posts that I have contributed here, and said that my ideas are quite interesting, but have asked why I haven't shown any projects that I have been working on (other than my Hydrogen Booster). Well, the best answer I can give is that these forums have kept me so occupied in doing research and answering questions that I haven't had time for implementing my ideas! Well, things are about to change, and I hope you will like what you see. Some may not, and some may even laugh at my next post, but remember the old saying - "He who laughs last laughs best."

Best wishes to all who have taken the time to read this introduction,

Rick
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Old 05-03-2009, 08:35 AM
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Preliminary assembly of test stand.



Hi folks,

Here is a photo showing my test apparatus in its early stage of development. It is pretty much pieced together now, although I have not yet attached the stator arm. The frame is made of 1 inch PVC pipe and fittings, so is quite lightweight, yet is of sufficient strength for my purposes. You can see that my rusty, salvaged junk Huffy 26 inch steel bike wheel is mounted between two steel plates attached to the PVC frame. And that's it, basically. A very simple and straight forward build. You might ask why I would choose to use this junk wheel, and the answer is simple - it was free. I love to make use of free parts whenever possible. The wheel rim was bent when I found it, but I straightened it out enough so that there is only about 1/8 inch of runout from side to side. The bearings aren't all that great either - I cleaned them and applied fresh wheel bearing grease, but it seems that at least one of the bearings has a flat on it, as I can hear an audible imperfection as the wheel rotates which sounds almost as if there were a grain of sand stuck in there. I'll see if I can round up replacement bearings, but will go ahead with my tests regardless. I figure that if my rig works well with this wheel then it can only do better with a good wheel and bearings. You will want to start looking for your wheel. You may get lucky and find one at your local recycling center, or find a good wheel on a used bike selling inexpensively in a local newspaper or on craigslist classifieds: jobs, housing, personals, for sale, services, community, events, forums on the Internet.

I wanted to build something that anyone could duplicate easily with minimal skills and very few tools needed, and at a reasonably low cost. It had to be sturdy enough to be practical and long lasting, light enough for one person to pick up and tote around, and versatile enough to allow for many uses. One could adapt this idea for use as a Bedini SSG, a mechanical motor, a pulse motor, a permanent magnetic motor, or perhaps some other use that I haven't thought of yet. What's nice is that this rig can be used horizontally as shown in the photo, or it can be tipped up to be used vertically as well. I'll be adding some leveling apparatus tomorrow to allow leveling in either plane. Of course the unit can also be turned over so that the opposite side of the wheel can be used for additional experimentation or enhancement. My magnets are expected to arrive tomorrow (Monday). In the meantime I will finish up my stator arm and leveling fixtures. I haven't used any cement to bond the PVC pipe and fittings - they are just hand tight right now. I wanted to keep things easy to disassemble so as to make alterations simple and quick. Once I have everything as I want it, I will tighten all the joints with #4 x 1/2" pan head sheet metal screws, which will still allow for disassembly or further alterations.

My next post will show the first stage of construction. If you would like to build this, and want to pick up all the PVC materials needed for the frame, here is what you will need:
  • Three 10 ft lengths of 1 inch, schedule 40, PVC pipe.
  • Sixteen 1 inch PVC elbows.
  • Sixteen 1 inch PVC tees.
Parts notes: I bought my 10 ft PVC pipes at Home Depot, where they are currently on sale at $2.37 each. The elbows and tees come in contractor bags of 5 at a reduced price of $2.66 per bag for tees and $2.15 per bag for elbows at Lowes, so if you buy them there you will need three bags of each plus one loose elbow and one loose tee, which cost $0.48 and $0.59 respectively. So total cost for the PVC parts listed above is $22.61. Additional parts used for the construction procedures will be shown as required for the various construction steps where needed.

Watch for the first stage of construction, which will be shown in my next post today. Additional steps will follow each day until all steps have been shown. I hope you find this project informative, useful, and enjoyable.

Best regards,

Rick
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Last edited by rickoff; 05-03-2009 at 10:19 AM. Reason: added info
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Old 05-03-2009, 09:48 AM
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Step One of construction



When building this, please take care to cut all pipes to the exact lengths specified for best results. A miter box and miter saw are needed for precise cuts, and you can find an inexpensive plastic miter box and miter saw combination at must building supply stores. Measure each piece carefully, and mark your pipe with a sharpened number 2 pencil. Lay the pipe in the miter box, align the mark with the miter box groove, place the saw in the groove and against the pipe. Then measure from the side of blade to the pipe end to be certain that the cut will be correct for the desired dimension. This will ensure precision and avoid wasted pipe pieces. After cutting a piece, debur both ends of the piece, as well as the end remaining from the 10 ft pipe. Use a flat file (or borrow your wife or girlfriend's emery board fingernail file) to debur the pipe ends after each cut. Do not file or sand the surface of the pipe ends to make them fit easily in the elbows and tees. They are already sized correctly, and should fit snugly. I suggest that you cut all your pipes first, before beginning assembly. When ready to assemble, start with section D and place a tee (part C) on each end. Lay a board on your floor, place the end of one tee on the board, and hold the assembly vertically. Place a small block of wood on top of the upper tee and tap on the block with a hammer until section D is seated fully into the tees. Lay the assembly on the floor and check to see if the center projection of both tees touches the floor at the same time when rolled over. If not, turn one of the tees so that they are aligned properly. Install a part B inside each end of the assembly and tap these in to seat them in the manner aforementioned. Then add part A elbows at each end and seat them. Lay the assembly on the floor and make certain that both elbows lay flat against the floor in alignment with each other. Aligning this way makes the remaining assembly steps easier. Next, repeat this procedure to make three more identical assemblies. When that work is completed, use parts E to join the assemblies together, again using care to seat the pipes properly. When finished, each of your two end assemblies will look like the one pictured above. Remember, do not use any cement to bind the joints. You will later be using number 4 x 1/2 inch pan head sheet metal screws to stabilize the pipe joints, but not until the entire test stand is complete. Each tee will require 10 screws, and each elbow will require 8 screws, so that comes to 288 screws. Best way is to buy three packs of 100. If you use a screwdriver to turn these in then your hand will get really tired unless you do just a few joints at a time. Better way is to use a small phillips head attachment on an electric driver or an electric drill which has variable trigger speed. You will need an electric drill and a 3/32" drill bit to make pilot holes for the screws, but don't drill the holes now. Wait until instructed to do so, please.

Thanks for your interest. I hope you found this first step of construction easy to follow and thoroughly explained. My aim is to make these construction procedures so simple that a third grade student could follow them with no problem. One does not need to be a skilled craftsman to build this, and if you follow directions carefully I think you will be pleased with the finished product.

Tomorrow I will post step #2 of the construction process, so be sure to return after completing step #1.

Best to all,

Rick
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Last edited by rickoff; 05-09-2009 at 09:31 PM. Reason: sp
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Old 05-03-2009, 10:12 AM
Tassie Mike Tassie Mike is offline
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Brilliant!!!

Whatever you do ---- "Do not stop"

I love it and will follow every move with enthusiasm !

Best of luck from here in

Downunder
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Old 05-03-2009, 10:15 AM
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Looking good Rick
Keep up the good work!
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Old 05-03-2009, 10:26 AM
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Replies to Tassie Mike and Jetijs:

Thanks for the kind words from both of you.

Mike - Don't worry, there's no stopping this project short of killing me, and I aim to get it all out here in the shortest time possible - no more than a week until completion of the basic running motor, and that's my promise.

Jetijs - Your motto fits in well with my rusty wheel. Just think, if I hadn't salvaged it at my local recycling center when I did, it would have been tossed into a bin with other metal parts and have been sent out for crushing. But now it has been saved and has a new life more special than its previous one. I just love turning junk into gold.

Best to both of you,

Rick
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Old 05-03-2009, 10:58 AM
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Michelinho Michelinho is offline
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Howard Johnson magnetic motor.

Hi rick,

That looks good and easy to replicate, too bad I have quite a few projects going. I'll follow your built and test setup for the magnetic motor.

I am familiar with Howard Johnson;work so I may step in to give you some help if you ever need it.

Take care and good luck,

Michel
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Old 05-03-2009, 11:09 AM
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Magnetic field shaping.

Hi rick,

Here are 2 pictures of how one can use magnetic field shaping like Howard Johnson used in his linear magnetic motor and his Stonehedge magnetic motor. It is a round magnet ring from a 5 1/4" floppy drive.

The first picture is the magnet and the flexible magnetic magnet (like the fridge magnets) and a AAA battery for size. The second picture is a view of the untouched magnetic field using a magnetic film viewer ( 6" X 6" ). The third is the same floppy disk ring magnet with a strip of flexible magnet around the inside of the ring.

Take care,

Michel
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Floppy_magnet_ring AAA_battery1ss.jpg (12.2 KB, 65 views)
File Type: jpg Original magnet.jpg (30.0 KB, 80 views)
File Type: jpg Altered fields.jpg (26.3 KB, 85 views)
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Old 05-03-2009, 12:24 PM
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tjnlsn255 tjnlsn255 is offline
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Smile Replication.....

Hi Rick,

I am following your every step.....

My transfer/recycle center has hundreds of dead bicycle wheels....

Time to do a little recycling.....

Keep up the GREAT work!

Tj
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Old 05-03-2009, 12:26 PM
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rickoff rickoff is offline
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Reply to Michelinho:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michelinho View Post
Hi rick,

That looks good and easy to replicate, too bad I have quite a few projects going. I'll follow your built and test setup for the magnetic motor.

I am familiar with Howard Johnson;work so I may step in to give you some help if you ever need it.

Take care and good luck,

Michel
Hi Michel,

Too bad you have too many projects going, as you would definitely find this one worthwhile, but I'm not asking anyone to postpone their own projects to attempt this. If you follow along and see the results in just a few days then I think you may want to build one. Thanks for your offer of assistance, but my design and preliminary testing is already complete and that is where I will be going with this - full speed ahead. The pictures that you posted really don't apply to my build, but some viewers might find them of interest in a separate Howard Johnson thread. Thanks for your participation.

Best regards,

Rick
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Old 05-03-2009, 01:20 PM
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Hello Rick

Looks like your off to a great start! A couple of questions, is the wheel and the 2 plates you used for mounting aluminum? If not don't you think it could cause some field problems.

Looking forward to seeing you succeed, Good Luck!
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Old 05-04-2009, 02:51 AM
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Reply to Mark:

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Originally Posted by Mark View Post
Hello Rick

Looks like your off to a great start! A couple of questions, is the wheel and the 2 plates you used for mounting aluminum? If not don't you think it could cause some field problems.

Looking forward to seeing you succeed, Good Luck!
Hi Mark,

Glad to see you have been in here. As pointed out in post #1, I am using a 26 inch steel wheel (chrome plated) from the front of a junked Huffy bicycle. Incidentally, a 26 inch wheel is given that dimension because of the tire size, but the diameter of the wheel alone is actually about 22+5/8 inches. There is absolutely no aluminum used in this build, and I believe that fact to be essential for best operation. Howard Johnson certainly understood that, and although it appears that he used aluminum for his stator frame, he took special care to keep that frame at enough distance to avoid interfering with his stator magnets.

Return often, Mark, as I'll be posting new material every day until my project is completed.

Best regards to you,

Rick
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Old 05-04-2009, 03:50 AM
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Reply to Stealth:

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Originally Posted by Stealth View Post
I will be checking in to see the progress you are making on this project. I am curious as to which setup you are attempting. Maybe a different direction altogether? I have been replicating different magnetic machines for years. Most have potential of being a self runner, but there is almost always one element missing from the equation. I wish you success with yours. Stealth
Hi Stealth,

I know exactly where you are coming from. I have been interested in magnetics all my life, and I'm 64 now. My dad was a brilliant scientist who worked for a company named Magnetic Metals, and he showed me some really interesting stuff. He was always bringing different shapes and sizes of magnets home to show me, and I developed a fascination for magnetics at a very early age. My dad told me that it was possible to build a permanent magnet motor, and showed me a mobile that he had constructed. It worked, and it ran for a very long time - until the magnets lost their strength. That was 54 years ago, when I was just 10 years old, and my dad died 3 years later. There is so much more that I could have learned from him had he lived several more years.

I have been researching magnetic motors and their inventors for several years now, and I know exactly how you feel. So much time and effort, with little results to show. Many others have gone before us and reported that it simply can't be done in a way that will provide useful rotational power, and we have heard this time and again. Unfortunately, it is statements like that, from electrical and mechanical engineers and other knowledgeable experts in their scientific fields that has deterred many of us from exploring the possibilities. After seeing the things my dad could do with magnets, I wasn't about to give up so easily, though. I had been developing this test setup design in order to work at testing several ideas that I have had over the years. It's perfect for what I want to do, and the low cost factor is nice because I am retired now. So this is strictly my own setup, made to suit my purposes, but I think it will prove very useful to many other people. I had been planning to start with some experiments on my Moving Stator PMM, and then suddenly all this commotion about MYLOW's HJ magnetic motor came along. So I decided that my first experiment would be to try a similar approach using Howard Johnson principles, but in a manner that can only be considered a radical departure from MYLOW's setup. The first thing you will notice, when comparing our fixtures, is that they are not even vaguely similar - they are totally different in structure and materials. The first thing you will notice about my apparatus is that the bike wheel axle is mounted between two steel plates, and that there is obviously no way that any force, other than the magnetic interaction, could be causing rotation. I will be explaining more later on about the reasons why I chose the materials and magnets that I am using, and I will soon start posting videos of my tests. I hope you will find all of this to be enjoyable and useful.

Best wishes,

Rick
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Old 05-04-2009, 10:15 AM
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Step # 2 of Construction techniques

The first step of construction showed how to make the framework end pieces. In this second step of construction, I show how to build the pieces that connect the two ends together. This step is shown in two parts, part 2A and part 2B, both of which are included in this post. The first photograph shows the individual pieces as joined together to make up the front and back rails, and the wheel support members, while the second shows how these assemblies are then joined together. Between the two photos, a chart will appear that identifies the various parts and their dimensions.





Please also note that while PVC pipe is manufactured to standard dimensions, elbows and tees from different manufacturers can be of differing overall dimensions. This should not be a problem if you buy all your tees and elbows at the same store, and verify that they are identical. Even if your tees and elbows are differently sized than mine, your frame will still go together properly. You may, however, need to adjust the lengths of parts G so that when step 2B is completed (as shown below) the measured distance from center to center of parts H will equal 6+3/4 inches. This measurement is necessary for proper alignment of the metal plates that will later attach to parts H in step #3. Likewise, if your overall dimensions are skewed slightly because of using different tees and elbows than mine, you may also need to adjust the lengths of parts I accordingly, making them shorter or longer, as necessary. For your information, my Tees measure 3+5/32" long on the outside, and have a seating depth of 7/8". My elbows are 2+3/8" in height (placed with one opening flat on a table top, and measuring from the table surface to the top of the tee, across the open face. The seating depth of my tees is 15/16".



Tomorrow I will post step #3, which shows how to prepare and attach the axle mounting plates to the support members, as well as attachment of the wheel and final assembly of the framework. Thank you for your continued interest.

Best regards,

Rick
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Old 05-04-2009, 11:34 AM
petersone petersone is offline
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Hi Rick
Following with great interest,keep it going!!!
peter
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Old 05-04-2009, 11:49 AM
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Reply to Tj:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjnlsn255 View Post
Hi Rick,

I am following your every step.....

My transfer/recycle center has hundreds of dead bicycle wheels....

Time to do a little recycling.....

Keep up the GREAT work!

Tj
Hi Tj,

Good to see you in here. Looks like you won't have any problem finding a wheel! When I found mine it was still on the bike, which had already been loaded into a junk metal bin at the recycling center. Someone had just thrown it in there as I was pulling up in my truck. It was almost closing time, so I just grabbed the entire bike and really didn't look it over until I had it at home. That's when I noticed the wheel was actually in fairly rough shape (rusty, bent rim, bent axle, bad bearings). After some fooling around with it I was able to get the axle somewhat straight, and unbend the rim so that it only runs out about an eight inch or so, but it would have been nice to find something better. Definitely go for a steel wheel (take a small ceramic magnet with you, and look for a chrome finished wheel. Some of the black finished wheels are steel too. I'll be posting more about the wheel selection in tomorrow's installment, which concerns finishing up the frame and mounting the wheel.

Thanks for your interest and participation, and best regards to you,

Rick
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Old 05-04-2009, 11:52 AM
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Reply to Peter:

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Originally Posted by petersone View Post
Hi Rick
Following with great interest,keep it going!!!
peter

Hi Peter,

Thanks for the kind words. I'm glad you are enjoying this, and I promise to make it interesting and worth your while to keep returning. Where do you hail from? I dont believe that I have conversed with you before this, and perhaps you are a new member here. Is that right? Anyways, welcome, and thanks for your participation.

Best to you,

Rick
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Old 05-04-2009, 12:18 PM
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Progress report:

Hi folks,

With any luck I will receive my shipment of magnets today, but won't know until late this afternoon. While waiting for the magnets I have kept myself busy preparing and posting the construction steps, tightening up my test stand joints, installing the leveling mechanisms, and working on my stator arm. The stator arm will be made of PVC also, and will be integrated with the framework. I am making it to be sturdy and fully adjustable. Once I find the best position for the stator, I will lock up all the adjustments. The stator arm can swing into or away from its operational position to allow maintenance procedures, and to stop the rotor. After the stator is working well, I have plans to add a second stator arm with a matching magnet. I'll adjust the second stator magnet out of sync with the first, so that one or the other will at all times be at peak efficiency. I'll explain more about that later. I may just take a ride to the nearest bike shop today to see if I can get replacement bearings for my junk wheel, as they are really quite bad. They sound like someone filled them with sand, but I cleaned and regreased them before I mounted the wheel, so it seems that some of the balls have flat spots that keep coming around. In spite of this, the wheel does rotate, and I'm sure that the magnets will be able to keep it spinning, but I know I won't be able to get the rpm that some good bearings would allow.

That's it for now. Best regards to all,

Rick
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Old 05-04-2009, 04:26 PM
petersone petersone is offline
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Hi Rick
I've been looking for some time,but only just signed up,from uk.
As I said keep going and good luck!!!
peter
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Old 05-04-2009, 07:14 PM
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Iotayodi Iotayodi is offline
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Rick if you have a magnetic sheet how about checking out the magnetic crown effect and any single pulses you get after its put together.
Thats a lot of magnets by the way!
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Old 05-04-2009, 07:34 PM
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Iotayodi Iotayodi is offline
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Mylows new video today btw:

YouTube - howard johnson magnetic motor
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Old 05-05-2009, 02:25 AM
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Rick its my dream to have every one post disclosures like that what a dream presentation looks like one of the best ones i have seen my friend thanks for posting
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Old 05-05-2009, 03:21 AM
tecknomancer tecknomancer is offline
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Thanks for all your efforts

The open design looks good!! your threads are always worth a read, I look forward seeing the results, magnetic motor generator is the holy Grail of zero input energy devices,
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Old 05-05-2009, 05:34 PM
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Reply to Ash:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashtweth View Post
Rick its my dream to have every one post disclosures like that what a dream presentation looks like one of the best ones i have seen my friend thanks for posting
Hi Ash,

Thank you for the good words. I'm trying my best to make everything in this presentation crystal clear, so that nothing can be misinterpreted or left to the imagination. From what you say, it looks like I'm doing an okay job of it so far.

I'll be posting the remaining construction steps for the frame, leveling apparatus, and wheel mounting assemblies later today, and tomorrow will show how the stator arm is fashioned and mounted. After that, most of my posts will either be informational and/or show links to video presentations of the experimental and testing stages.

Thanks again for your comments, Ash, and best wishes to you,

Rick
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Old 05-05-2009, 07:00 PM
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Reply to Tecknomancer:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tecknomancer View Post
The open design looks good!! your threads are always worth a read, I look forward seeing the results, magnetic motor generator is the holy Grail of zero input energy devices,
Hi Tecknomancer,

Thanks for your gracious comments. I really appreciate all the kind words and encouragement that I have been receiving since I started this thread. My primary purpose is to demonstrate how an effective rotational test device for magnetic experiments can easily be constructed and utilized in a number of different configurations (horizontal, vertical, steel wheel, non-magnetic wheel, flywheel effect, fixed stator, moving stator, etc.). I'd like to see as many people as possible joining this magnetic motor effort, because - as you say - it would be a triumph for mankind if a truly useful magnetic motor-generator can actually be produced. I can only hope that I will succeed, or that someone else will, and that free energy will become a commonly accepted alternative in meeting our energy needs .

By working with a common build such as this, individual experimenters can contribute and share ideas, and show test results, that can then be easily tested and verified by other individuals. If we are all using the same apparatus, then what works for one will work for all, and I think that anyone will be able to see the importance of that. The main point in such experiments is to always utilize readily available magnets, and other parts, rather than to experiment with non-identifiable or otherwise obscure items. With many people conducting these experiments, we can try out many different magnet configurations, and that is a distinct advantage. Magnets can be expensive, and for a single person to undertake these experiments with various sized and shaped magnets would no doubt be cost prohibitive. With many people sharing the expense, a positive outlook becomes more certain, and success becomes highly probable. It is important that all who participate in these experiments share precise information as to the exact magnets and layout that they are using. I will list the specifications of my magnets as I begin testing. I don't suggest that everyone rush to buy the same magnets in large quantities until we can achieve a setup that does show continuous and useful rotational thrust. It would be far wiser for other individuals to try different magnets and configurations, and to share those results. If each person who joins this effort will send me their e-mail address, I will send this group a list of magnets which are currently being tested, and will continually update and mail the freshened list to all participants when a new specification or configuration is added. This will prevent unnecessary duplications, and ensure that our testing is done in the most efficient and cost effective way possible. For anyone wishing to participate in this project, please e-mail me at rickandlezel@hotmail.com and I will add you to the e-mail group. I will use a blind carbon copy (bcc) for all addresses on the list, so you needn't worry that your address will appear in mail received by others. I hope to see many people building this apparatus and joining the effort. All I ask is that people don't start e-mailing me with a lot of questions, as I certainly will not be able to respond to everyone, and any attempt to do so would only result in slowing the progress of my experiments. If you have questions, please ask them here in this forum so that everyone can read the question and the answer. Also, as I mentioned in my opening post, I think that people will find that most questions that they have in mind will be found answered within this thread if they read through my posts carefully, and I will continue to post further information regularly.

Thanks to all for your continued interest.

Best regards,

Rick
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Old 05-06-2009, 04:00 AM
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Step 3 to follow:

Hi folks,

I will be posting construction step #3 photos in just a few minutes. I was delayed because my camera battery needed recharging.

Rick

It took longer than I expected to label, annotate, and upload the 14 pictures shown in step #3, but I am nearly finished now, so if you come in and see only this please return in a few minutes and all will be completed.
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Last edited by rickoff; 05-06-2009 at 05:27 AM. Reason: added info at bottom
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Old 05-06-2009, 06:10 AM
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Construction Step #3 details

Hi folks,

The following 14 photos show how the axle mounting plates are prepared and then mounted to the wheel support frame members. The plates that I used were found at Lowe's Home Center. They are referred to as "Code Protection Plates," are part number 214828, and sell for $3.28 each. They measure 5" x 8" and are 1/16" thick. You will normally find them in the lumber section with other framing plates. These are used in walls to protect hidden electrical wiring and water pipes from damage should a homeowner attempt to drill or drive a nail into the wall at that location. The plates each have two sharp prongs projecting from one side, and you will need to remove these as shown in the instructions. Don't forget these sharp prongs are there when handling them, and warn the cashier before handing the plates to him or her. You will need two of these plates, and eight each of the following attachment hardware:
1/4" -20 x 2" long cap screws
1/4" -20 hex nuts
1/4" flat washers
1/4" lock washers

If you can not find these particular plates, look for a plate of similar dimensions, but do not use anything with lesser thickness. While only 1/16" thick, these plates are rigid enough to support the axle nicely.

If you have a work bench and steel jaw vise, I suggest that you use your vise to hold the plates as they are being worked upon. The following pictures show the necessary steps undertaken using minimal tools for the most part, and makeshift 2 x 4 work supports, since many people will probably not have a well equipped workshop. Where a handheld Moto Tool grinder is shown, a flat file can be substituted for deburring sharp edges. When drilling the plates, always drill slowly. I was not able to show it in the photos, but while actually drilling I used a second and larger ViseGrip tool, clamped onto the plates, to hold them steady. Please, never attemp to drill an object while holding it with your hand. I know this is common sense to the mechanically inclined of you, but to those not aware of the danger - a drill can siddenly seize up part way through the plate (especially if excessive drilling pressure is used) and the result will be very unfriendly to your hand. This kind of accident can break a finger, snap a tendon, or severely cut your hand. So please work safely. Clamp the plates in a vise, or use a large ViseGrip tool clamped tightly to the plates, and hold the vise grips - not the plates. Alternatively, you can temporarily drive a nail in half way, through a plate hole, into each of the 2 x 4's, and hold one of the 2 x 4's with your hand to steady it. When drilling as instructed in the following steps, drill slowly by letting the drill bit take time to do its work. Don't be in a hurry. Drill all the way through the two clamped plates and into the 2 x 4. Realign the plates before each new hole is drilled. FOLLOW ALL OF THESE STEPS CAREFULLY:



























Please note before tightening nuts: Install 1/4" lockwashers between the flat washers and the nuts. Sorry I left that out in the photo.

Repeat the last two steps for the remaining plate. When done, assemble all frame members together but do not cement or install fasteners in pipes.

You may wonder why I advise attaching the plates so that they butt up against the elbows, rather than mounting them at the center of the support member pipes. I arranged it this way for three reasons. First, butting the plates against the elbows ensures good plate and axle alignment. Secondly, since the wheel extends beyond the frame at one side, this makes for open and easy magnet placement and stator viewing. Third, if the wheel is used in a vertical orientation, the stand can rest on the long side opposite from where the axle plates are mounted. The wheel can also be set vertically by placing the stand on either of the shorter ends, but the long side's wider stance offers even better stability. SG users, however, may want to mount the axle plates at the center of the plate supports so that each corner member of the frame is equidistant from the wheel rim, as this could more easily facilitate mounting of multiple coils. If mounting at the center of the plate supports, I suggest that the axle hole in one of the plates be drilled slightly larger than the axle, as this will allow for easier and optimal alignment of the axle and wheel to the frame.

Continue on to Step #4, in the next post.

Best regards to all,

Rick
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Last edited by rickoff; 05-25-2009 at 06:22 AM. Reason: sp
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Old 05-06-2009, 09:03 AM
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Construction Step #4

This step involves mounting the wheel between the metal plates that were prepared and installed in step #3.

First, let me say a few words about the size and type of wheel that I chose. I found this wheel free, since the bike it was on had been thrown into a scrap metal bin at the local recycling center, but I did not take this particular bike simply because it was all that was available. I took it because it met my qualifying factors. First of all, I wanted a large diameter wheel of 26 to 28 inches, and this bike had 26 inch wheels. Actually, the true diameter of the wheel alone is about 22.5 inches. Bike wheels are specified according to the tire size, which in this case was 26". A large wheel magnetic motor has a better chance of succeeding than a small one, and this is because less force is required at the perimeter of a large wheel to rotate the wheel. This is true because of the additional leverage provided at that distance from the axle. If you can find a used 26 inch wheel that appears to rotate well, and with little if any runout, by all means grab it. If we can duplicate our builds to the same specs, then test results achieved by one can be achieved by all. If you go with a different size wheel, please let me know your tire size (marked on the tire sidewall, same as with automobiles) so I can make note of it on my spec sheet. Please note that my wheel came from the front of a Huffy bike, and has a 5/16" axle that is 5+1/4" (5.25") long. I priced a brand new replacement wheel at a local bike shop, and that was only $40, which isn't bad at all. I'll probably pick one up later, but this old junker will serve the purpose for experimentation's sake.

Secondly, I wanted a steel wheel rather than one of aluminum or other non-magnetic material. My reason for wanting a steel wheel is twofold:
1. Magnets are easily placed on a steel wheel without need of gluing, taping, or otherwise attaching them, and they will stay in place nicely (provided of course that you don't allow your stator magnet to come too close to, or in contact with them). This method also allows for the rotor magnets (the magnets on the wheel) to be easily repositioned for various experimental reasons.
2. Howard Johnson actually specified, in his magnetic motor patent, use of a permeability plate beneath the rotor magnets. While high permeability plate material such a Netic Conetic, or MuMetal, are considered the best such materials, they are expensive. The steel bicycle wheel, which is chrome plated, also offers a fair degree of permeability, so it makes sense to use a wheel of this material. I strongly advise against any use of aluminum in your build, as aluminum has a really weird effect on strong magnets, which is detrimental to movement. I will post a demonstration of that effect soon in a brief video so that you will understand what I am talking about if you don't already know.

Step 4A: Remove your wheel from the front of the bike (if it is currently attached) by removing the outside nuts on the axle. Hang on to the nuts - don't throw them out - as you will be using them later. Pull the wheel off the slots at the bottom of the forks to remove it from the bike. Next, deflate the tire by removing the valve stem cap and inserting a small tool, drill shank, or nail into the stem opening to depress the center pin, which will allow the air to escape. After all air is exhausted, remove one side of the tire from the rim by prying it out with a flat but blunt tool (no need to damage the tube, as it might come in handy at some future time) and then running the tool around the circumference of the wheel. Take the tube out next, and then remove the remainder of the tire in the same manner as above. If this is a used bike, you should clean and relubricate the bearings. To do that, remove both of the remaining nuts. These are the wheel bearing retaining and adjustment nuts, and in many cases they have a shaped surface at the inside which provides one of the two surfaces that the ball bearings ride upon. With one of these nuts removed, you should be able to then pull the axle out the other side and remove the wheel bearings from their seats. Some bearings, like the Huffy, have ball bearings set into a cage, which makes removal simple. Others may not have a cage, and if this is the case use special care not to lose any of the small ball bearings. Pick the bearings out, catch them in a clean paper towel or cloth rag, and set aside. Wipe the old grease from the bearing seats, and inspect the seats for roughness. If they look to be good, then apply a fresh coating of wheel bearing grease to the seats with a clean finger. You can get a small quantity of such grease at your local auto supply store. Use a high quality lithium based grease, either green or white. Later on I will talk about some other specialty lubricants that may also be used. The old grease can be cleaned off the bearings by first wiping them off with a clean, lint free cloth and then washing them with alcohol. Let them air dry - don't blow them with an airgun. Then place the bearings back into the seats and apply another course of grease over them. Clean the axle shaft nicely, reinsert it from the side you pulled it from, and reinstall the cleaned and greased outer seats and/or nuts. Adjust the bearing nuts up fingertight for now, and you are ready to mount the wheel. Even if you bought a brand new wheel, it is wise to check and make sure that it was greased at the factory. Assemblers make mistakes, and you don't want to mount an ungreased wheel and ruin the bearings.

Step 4B - mounting the wheel
Go to your local hardware store and get 4 hexagon jam nuts that match the thread on your axle. Jam nuts are not nearly as thick as regular nuts. Take one of the outer axle mounting nuts with you, and match the thread size and pitch by turning it onto a cap screw from a bin at the store, and then buy nuts of that size and thread pitch. Also buy 4 fender washers of your axle size. Fender washers have an extra large diameter, but same thickness as a regular flat washer. Place a jam nut on both ends of the axle, and turn these in until they rest against the bearing adjustment nuts. Now tip your frame assembly up into a vertical wheel mounting position (vertical, just like on the bike). Insert your hands in between the two plates and push to spread them outwards a bit. Measure to see that there is enough clearance between them for the axle to be inserted. Next, place the remaining two jam nuts on the axle ends and thread them in just enough so that the amount of axle protruding from each end equals the thickness of one fender washer plus one of your original outer nuts, plus 1/16" for the mounting plate. This is so that when installed and tightened, the outer nuts will sit flush with the axle ends. Place a fender washer over each end of the axle, lift the wheel into your frame, insert one end of the axle into a plate center hole, then align the other axle end with the remaining plate hole and push the plate onto the axle. Install the remaining two fender washers, and the original outer nuts. Thread the nuts up hand tight, then place adjusting wrenches on the nuts at both sides of the fender washers. Turn the nuts to lock the axle to the plates.

Step 4C - adjusting the bearings
Hold the wheel rim in your hand and try to move it from side to side. If you notice any free-play wobble, turn one of the bearing adjustment nuts in just a little tighter and recheck the side play. You want to eliminate all wobble, but be careful not to overtighten the adjustment nut any more than necessary to remove the wobble, as this would slow rotation and be hard on the bearings. When adjusted properly, hold each adjustment not steady while you cinch up the remaining jam nuts against them to lock their positions.

Done with the wheel mounting! At this point, your assembly should look much like the photo shown in post #2 of this thread, minus the magnets and hopefully minus the rust!

The next installment will show how to make and install the levelling apparatus, and how to align the frame members and lock them in place.

Best to all,

Rick
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Old 05-06-2009, 09:15 AM
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Progress Update

Hi folks,

My magnets actually arrived late Monday afternoon, but I really haven't had an opportunity to experiment with them yet since I have been quite busy posting the construction details. I wanted to get all the details posted so that builders can get up to speed on this project and follow along with me. I'll post the levelling system and frame aligning/tightening procedures later today, and the following day will show how the stator arm is made up. If the weather is good this coming weekend, I will probably head up north to open my cottage for the summer, and will return home Sunday. That will give people a chance to catch up with the construction details. After returning, I'll start posting some videos to explain about the magnets I am using, how to handle and place the magnets on the wheel, and how to adjust the stator arm.

Until later,

Rick
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Old 05-06-2009, 01:02 PM
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theremart theremart is offline
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Double the fun.

Rick

As I looked at your setup I kept thinking, this could double as a Bedini SSG energizer as well. One could hotmelt glue the ceramic magnets on...

I guess the simplest would to be to have multiple wheels one for a Bedini setup and one for a Mylow setup...


Your are laying some great ground work that could be used in multiple ways..

Great job!
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