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  #1  
Old 03-10-2019, 05:29 AM
bobo36us bobo36us is offline
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Is this engine overunity???

ok, suspending the fact that this car is outside most of our budgets, maybe the price could come substantially down with mass production.

Koenigsegg has a new engine out that claims: "the Jesko gets a reworked version of the Agera RS' 5.0-liter twin-turbo V-8. It makes 1,280 hp and 1,106 lb-ft of torque if you run it on gasoline, but if you switch to E85, that power figure jumps to a Bugatti Chiron-beating 1,600 hp."

Assuming that engine were to turn a generator, how many homes could it power, and at let's say $3 per gallon for fuel, wouldn't this most likely be overunity?

I'm still looking up some numbers, but it appears that the average kwh per home per day is around 30. And, I also found this online:

"Multiply the number of horsepower by the time the power is exerted. For example, if you have a 20-horsepower motor running for three hours, you would multiply 20 by 3 to get 60 horsepower-hours.

Multiply the number of horsepower-hours by 0.7457 kilowatts per horsepower-hour to convert to kilowatt-hours. In this example, you would multiply 60 by 0.7457 to get 44.742 kilowatt-hours."

Soooooo..........1600hp x 24hours = 38,400 horsepower-hours x 0.7457 = 28,634 kilowatt-hours. Divide that by the nationwide average of 30 kwh per home per day, and it looks like this one single motor could power 954 homes (28634 / 30). Does this sound right, or even possible????

If it is, then lets say that motor consumes 1 gallon of fuel per hour at $3 per gallon, that would be just $72 per day to power 954 homes? That's just 7.5 cents per day, or just $2.26 per month? Can that even be right?

Maybe that motor runs through a gallon of fuel in just 5 minutes though, wouldn't that still just make the cost of electricity per month the $2.26 above x 12, or just $27.12?

Of course there are oil changes, maintenance, distribution costs, etc., but couldn't this be considered overunity, or at least a far less expensive and localized way of supplying power to homes?

What am I missing, cuz my electric bill is usually 10x that or more!

Also, why the heck would E-85 produce more power than gasoline?
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  #2  
Old 03-10-2019, 09:46 PM
bistander bistander is online now
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Going fast

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo36us View Post
ok, suspending the fact that this car is outside most of our budgets, maybe the price could come substantially down with mass production.

Koenigsegg has a new engine out that claims: "the Jesko gets a reworked version of the Agera RS' 5.0-liter twin-turbo V-8. It makes 1,280 hp and 1,106 lb-ft of torque if you run it on gasoline, but if you switch to E85, that power figure jumps to a Bugatti Chiron-beating 1,600 hp."

Assuming that engine were to turn a generator, how many homes could it power, and at let's say $3 per gallon for fuel, wouldn't this most likely be overunity?

I'm still looking up some numbers, but it appears that the average kwh per home per day is around 30. And, I also found this online:

"Multiply the number of horsepower by the time the power is exerted. For example, if you have a 20-horsepower motor running for three hours, you would multiply 20 by 3 to get 60 horsepower-hours.

Multiply the number of horsepower-hours by 0.7457 kilowatts per horsepower-hour to convert to kilowatt-hours. In this example, you would multiply 60 by 0.7457 to get 44.742 kilowatt-hours."

Soooooo..........1600hp x 24hours = 38,400 horsepower-hours x 0.7457 = 28,634 kilowatt-hours. Divide that by the nationwide average of 30 kwh per home per day, and it looks like this one single motor could power 954 homes (28634 / 30). Does this sound right, or even possible????

If it is, then lets say that motor consumes 1 gallon of fuel per hour at $3 per gallon, that would be just $72 per day to power 954 homes? That's just 7.5 cents per day, or just $2.26 per month? Can that even be right?

Maybe that motor runs through a gallon of fuel in just 5 minutes though, wouldn't that still just make the cost of electricity per month the $2.26 above x 12, or just $27.12?

Of course there are oil changes, maintenance, distribution costs, etc., but couldn't this be considered overunity, or at least a far less expensive and localized way of supplying power to homes?

What am I missing, cuz my electric bill is usually 10x that or more!

Also, why the heck would E-85 produce more power than gasoline?
Hi Bobo,

I'm no expert with the ICE, internal combustion engine. In fact, I hate them. Still use them; necessary evil, in my mind. As to the question at the end of your post: E85 contains ~ 30% oxygen. The engine can be tuned differently and achieve like a 35% greater power output.
Ref. https://www.hpacademy.com/blog/how-m...u-make-on-e85/

As to the basic premise of your post, you need to get actual fuel consumption data. I have no doubt you grossly underestimate that. You could also do the calculations using the specific power, or specific energy of the fuel itself and then factor in conversion efficiency of the engine and generator.

Performance specifications such as you use from the automobile are likely peak numbers and not sustainable for long periods (minutes). Few places one could keep it floored and I have read how long it would be before you ran out of gas. Don't recall the number but it was barely after you hit top speed.

Good questions.

bi
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Old 03-11-2019, 04:16 PM
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ewizard ewizard is offline
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If I recall running at full horsepower that car will consume the entire gas tank in about 9 minutes. So I can assure you it is not overunity. You'd also be close to redline in RPM to get that 1600 HP and I"m sure that is not sustainable for long periods of time. It is a hugely incorrect assumption that it would generate 1600 HP and consume only 1 gallon per hour.
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