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  #31  
Old 09-20-2018, 01:20 AM
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Good one, Cadman. I have often wondered if the engineers are really as stupid as they seem to be, or if the car companies tell them to design the vehicles to be a nightmare to work on just so that they can bleed the owners dry on parts and labor charges when they come back for service needs. I worked for many years as a mechanic, and also as an automotive machinist, so have always done all my own work. Now that I'm retired, I still do my own work - and for two reasons: 1. I want to be certain it is done right. 2. There is no way I could afford to pay someone charging $100+ per hour, plus tripling the price of parts, to do the work.
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  #32  
Old 10-16-2019, 02:43 PM
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Project continued...

Very sorry for the delay in continuing postings with updates on the 3/4 inch build. Some folks may have thought that I had dropped off the face of the planet Earth, but that didn't happen. I did, however, run into what seemed like one thing after another that continually either distracted me or took precedent, including the unexpected death of my younger brother late in March. I see now that it has been nearly a year since I last posted. I had to read through my thread to refresh my mind as to what I had already shown. Although I'm still not entirely "out of the woods," so to speak, and have several more things that I must attend to before the cold weather sets in, I decided to at least get a head start today on moving the project along.

I had already purchased two sheets of 24 inch x 24 inch hardboard for constructing the larger wheels I had talked about. These wheels are laid out for a 24 inch diameter, and with an 8.5 inch radius bore hole circle, which is the dimension that Cadman determined (see his 06-11-2018 10:07 AM post) would result in a 68 degree from vertical lay angle for each of the pipes. There will be 6 bore holes cut into each wheel, so the radian lines are drawn at 60 degree intervals. The two wheels will be positioned upon a 3/8 inch diameter shaft, and spaced as close together as the construction allows. (about 1 inch, as previously figured). I'm attaching a jpg image file so you can have a look at the layout lines for one of the two wheels, which are of course laid out identically.



The wheel layout and cutting process is the same as covered in my post # 19, except of course that the diameters of the inner and outer circles are larger for the wheel now being shown. Previously the inner circle was drawn at a 4.5 inch radius, and now we have an 8.5 inch radius. That may seem like an extensive increase just to get from the previous lay line angle of 73.75 down to a 68 degree angle, just a 5.75 degree difference, but as I noted in post # 23, the further out the bore hole is located from the center of the wheel, the less effect it has on the change in angle.

A 68 degree from vertical lay angle is what I had estimated would be optimal, as it would allow tube A, as seen in post #2, to have moved all its water to the left side of the vertical center line when the bore hole center for that tube is located 15 degrees before the vertical center line with the wheel turning counter-clockwise.

The 27 millimeter bore holes will be centered on the inner circle, at the points where the radian lines intersect that circle. After I cut out and true the wheel, and drill the bore holes, I'll begin the process of assembling the pipes onto both wheels and fitting the wheels to the 3/8 inch diameter shaft. I may do this with the smaller wheels first, just to prove whether or not that version, with a lay angle of 73.75, was adequate for continuous motion. As I had mentioned in an earlier post, the end caps can be attached to the elbow extension of each tube using silicone sealant, which will allow me to remove the end caps later and change over to the larger wheels. The supporting base and uprights will be the same for either build, so changing out to the larger wheels will be relatively easy.

Even though I had stated early on that a 3/4 inch tube build might restrict water flow inward and outward to the point where the wheel might not function that well, or function at all, I do believe that both the 12 inch and 24 inch wheels will work to some degree simply because they will be overbalanced at the left side of the vertical center line. Also, the actual inside diameter of the tubes is 0.824 inch, rather than the 0.750 inch that one would expect of a 3/4 inch tube. I do believe, however, that the steeper lay line angle of 68 degrees as offered by the larger wheel will prove to work best. We will soon see, and have a visual video comparison for the two builds. If the 3/4 inch build size does work, as is expected, then builds using larger tube sizes should work even better.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 24 inch water wheel.JPG (395.6 KB, 21 views)
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Last edited by rickoff; 10-16-2019 at 03:16 PM.
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  #33  
Old 10-16-2019, 10:06 PM
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Sawt2 Sawt2 is online now
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Very sorry for your loss, my prayers are with you.
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  #34  
Old 10-20-2019, 04:25 PM
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Reply to Sawt2

Thank you for your kind words. It is tough to unexpectedly lose a younger sibling.
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  #35  
Old 10-20-2019, 04:59 PM
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Just one week ago the foliage here looked great at its peak of coloration, but then the leaves began to fall. A long day of wind and rain then took its toll, and afterwards many trees were bare. Not much color left out there today. Plenty of green, of course, as Maine is known as the pine tree state. Still a few trees with yellow leaves that were still green a week ago, but that's about it. Although the temperature rises to around 55 degrees or so by mid day, the overnight and morning temperatures have been in the low 30's. Heavy frosts have killed whatever was left in my vegetable garden, except for the carrots. This weekend I worked hard to get all my tractor implements put away in the back part of my garage, and added antifreeze concentrate to my tractor and cars as necessary to ensure they are safe to at least 25 below zero or more. Still a few things to be taken care of before the snow starts to fly and it becomes bitter cold outdoors.

I took an inventory yesterday of items that I have on hand for the water wheel project so that I could determine what else is still needed. This afternoon I'm heading to the hardware store to get a few items that I'll need for assembling the water wheel support system. I may also have time to cut out the 24 inch wheels that I laid out on October 16th. In my next post I'll show the main components that I'm using for the base and support system. As usual, I try to keep the build as simple as possible, and either attempt to use whatever I may have on hand already that would be suitable, or look for items that I can procure locally and at low cost.
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"Seek wisdom by keeping an open mind to alternative realities, questioning authority, and searching for truth. Only then, when you see or hear something that has 'the ring of truth' to it, will it be as if a veil has been lifted, and suddenly you will begin to hear and see far more clearly than ever before." - Rickoff
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  #36  
Old 10-25-2019, 01:29 AM
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A few of the support elements....

I'm attaching a photo showing some of the support elements. At top is one of the two 3-sided steel support columns that will be used as the uprights. These measure .650 inch x .428 inch x 24 inches in length. These are very strong and rigid. You might recognize them for what they are. These would normally be mounted to a wall or cabinet interior, and shelf brackets would be inserted in the slots at a desired height. There are actually three mounting holes along the length of the upright, though only the top one is shown at left in this photo. The bottom hole, at the opposite end of the upright, will attach to the 1 and 5/8 inch piece of aluminum "L" stock shown at right, using a single screw, and the "L" stock will be mounted to a 3/4 inch thick x 12 and 11/16 inch x 24 inch birch plywood base using two screws. The shorter piece of aluminum "L" stock will be used at four locations of the build as anchor points for 1/8 inch x 3/4 inch wide flat aluminum stock that will connect to the uprights (two per upright) at an angle, to stabilize them. A 3/8 inch x 1 inch x 2 inch wooden block, as shown at left, with a 1/2 inch hole drilled at center, is fitted with a flanged bronze bushing with a 3/8 inch inside diameter. This will be attached to each of the uprights using two screws spaced 1 inch apart, and the screws will pass through the two slots nearest the top end (adjacent to where the block is now located). In other words, if you were to pick the block straight up, then move it over and place it on top of the upright, that would be the mounting position. Attaching the blocks in this manner allows the bushings to be moved up or down in order to achieve best alignment with the 3/8 inch x 6 inch shaft. Aside from the elements shown and/or mentioned, there will also be four shaft collars that attach to the shaft with set screws. Two of these collars will ride up against the bronze bushing flanges near the ends of the shaft to eliminate side play of the shaft, and the other two will ride up against each of the two wheels. I will also either pin or bond the two inner shaft collars to the wheels to offset the wheels by 30 degrees. That covers everything I'll be using for the supporting fixture. I'll post another photo in a few days showing the assembled fixture.

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"Seek wisdom by keeping an open mind to alternative realities, questioning authority, and searching for truth. Only then, when you see or hear something that has 'the ring of truth' to it, will it be as if a veil has been lifted, and suddenly you will begin to hear and see far more clearly than ever before." - Rickoff

Last edited by rickoff; 10-25-2019 at 02:51 AM.
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  #37  
Old 10-25-2019, 03:14 PM
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24 inch diameter wheels prepped

I was able to cut out my larger 24 inch wheels, and to bore the 27 millimeter holes in them. Here's a view of one of the wheels. The holes are centered on a 17 inch circle at a point where each of six 60 degree radian lines intersect that circle. The hole at the center of the wheel is drilled 1/4 inch to accept a 1/4 inch x 2 inch long stove bolt that is fitted with a 1/4 inch washer on each side of the wheel and then snugged with a 1/4 inch nut. This way I can mount the stove bolt in a drill chuck to rotate the wheel as I sand the rough cut perimeter, which was cut with a saber saw. After sanding the perimeter, I will enlarge the center hole to 3/8 inch to accept the shaft which the wheels will be rotating upon.



Below is an image of the 27 millimeter boring tool that I used for drilling the pipe attachment bore holes. The pilot drill for this tool is 3/16 inch. While this appeared to be an ideal tool for the intended use, I found that, while cutting, the space between teeth loads up rather quickly and that I have to keep cleaning out that material since it has nowhere to go. Also, I found that even though the hardboard panel is only 1/4 inch thick, it was difficult to drill more than half way through the panel without burning the material. Thus, I found that the best solution was to drill just half way through one side and then flip the panel over to finish drilling from the other side. For a larger size build I would definitely prefer using an adjustable cutting tool.


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"Seek wisdom by keeping an open mind to alternative realities, questioning authority, and searching for truth. Only then, when you see or hear something that has 'the ring of truth' to it, will it be as if a veil has been lifted, and suddenly you will begin to hear and see far more clearly than ever before." - Rickoff

Last edited by rickoff; 10-25-2019 at 03:20 PM.
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  #38  
Old 11-07-2019, 02:38 AM
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Here's a photo showing what I decided to use for the wheel hubs. What you see is a 3/8 inch inside diameter shaft collar having a 3/8 inch width and 3/4 inch outside diameter, fitted with a shaft attachment set screw which you see exposed. The shaft collar is bonded to a 1/8 inch thick, 1 and 1/2 inch diameter fender washer using a clear 5 minute epoxy. Each wheel has two of these hubs sandwiching the wheel center, and are drawn tightly against the wheel by the two #8-32 pan head stainless screws seen in the photo, and fitted with flat washers and nuts on the opposite side. I pre-drilled two of the fender washers with a 5/32 inch drill bit using my bench top drill press, then inserted the 3/8 inch shaft into an undrilled hub assembly, through the center hole of the wheel, and on through the drilled hub assembly. Locking the shaft collars onto the shaft, I then used the pre-drilled holes as a guide to drill through the wheel and the undrilled hub washer. By the way, I had actually only inserted the shaft as far as the tip of the shaft collar before drilling so as to prevent any damage to the shaft from the drill chuck, and then extended the shaft further out before taking the photo. I had originally planned to use only one hub assembly for each wheel, but decided on using two for additional stability. With the two screws passing through each wheel and locking the hubs together, there is absolutely no chance of a wheel breaking loose from a hub, or the two wheels drifting out of proper alignment with each other. I would have preferred using 1/8 x 2 inch fender washers if they had been available, as this would have allowed more space between the screws and the shaft collars, but couldn't find larger ones locally. I also would have preferred using Torx star drive screws rather than these Phillips head screws, but made do with what was available. Using all four of my shaft collars for the wheel hubs of course necessitated obtaining two more shaft collars to be used near the outer ends of the shaft. My next step will be to lay out the attachment areas on the wood base, and to attach the 6 anchors, 2 uprights, and 4 stabilizer links.

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"Seek wisdom by keeping an open mind to alternative realities, questioning authority, and searching for truth. Only then, when you see or hear something that has 'the ring of truth' to it, will it be as if a veil has been lifted, and suddenly you will begin to hear and see far more clearly than ever before." - Rickoff
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  #39  
Old 11-07-2019, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickoff View Post
Good one, Cadman. I have often wondered if the engineers are really as stupid as they seem to be, or if the car companies tell them to design the vehicles to be a nightmare to work on just so that they can bleed the owners dry on parts and labor charges when they come back for service needs. I worked for many years as a mechanic, and also as an automotive machinist, so have always done all my own work. Now that I'm retired, I still do my own work - and for two reasons: 1. I want to be certain it is done right. 2. There is no way I could afford to pay someone charging $100+ per hour, plus tripling the price of parts, to do the work.
remember the checker cars
built to last forever
and they almost deliver that goal
I am quite sad that they went out of business in the 1970s
but it really does show that people end up getting what they buy
people voted for the cars designed to fall apart with what they bought.
and that is not about to change now
now there are so many regulations on a new car company that they are not really possible.
so past people have really set the future, or at least until this current law set fails to apply
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  #40  
Old 11-08-2019, 01:33 PM
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My Dad bought a Checker in the 70's [loved it

Rick
Sorry to read about your Brother.

Always love your builds and contributions .

here I offer something which might be good for an arrow in your quiver someday ...
to ponder the "whatifs" ??.

around 9 minute mark a most curious detail [Glass water and charge ?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzVa_tX1OiI

shared By member Masterplaster elsewhere.

I would love to buy you a coffee some day and chat about this wild FE world

much Gratitude and respect
Chet K
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  #41  
Old 11-08-2019, 10:31 PM
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Did anybody see the video with (I think) a Filipino man showing his
over balanced wheel. The video is a crazy tittle and now I can't find
it. Anyway first he used regular water and his tubes were "S" shaped.

Anyone? Then he goes on to say mercury is special or has important
properties key to this device? Anybody see that guy? Then he pulled
out all of the water and added mercury. Immediately the wheel turned
and fast.

I am still trying to find him, because I watched some video's along these
lines he popped up and now he is gone.
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  #42  
Old 11-08-2019, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickoff View Post
Thank you for your kind words. It is tough to unexpectedly lose a younger sibling.
Deepest sympathies on your loss. Maybe someday you will meet up again.
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  #43  
Old 11-09-2019, 03:36 AM
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here is the video I was looking for

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