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  #1  
Old 09-13-2017, 03:35 PM
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SkyWatcher SkyWatcher is offline
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Induction Heater Used As Efficient Space Heater

Hi all, I've been making some experiments with heat generated in steel, using induction with coils.
I first tried a bunch of ferromagnetic and electrically conductive nails as a core and used my stingo pulser to see if any heat was created in the core.
Heat was created, though not much.
Then i tried a large 3/4" diameter by 6" long steel bolt, that created more heat within the core.
Was only using about 14 watts and collecting much of the power off the full wave bridge into 20 watt resistor.
I figured we want the biggest field change in the core, so i tried alternating current.
I was inspired to try these experiments, by looking at what little information their is about the Steorn hepha heater device, which apparently uses regular wall AC as the input.
I'm using various step down transformers i have on hand in these tests, to about 12-26 volts AC.
At around 26 watts shown on the killiwatt meter input from grid, it only takes a few minutes until the bolt core is getting too hot to touch and at 130 watts input from a little higher voltage transformer, the core gets too hot to touch in less than a minute.
I just picked up a 2 foot long, 3/4" dia. steel threaded rod, i plan to mount a coil in the middle and see how that heats up.
Then the idea is, to add aluminum heat sink fins along the length of the rod and also if needed, add a couple more coils at equal points on steel rod.
Your thoughts are welcome.
peace love light
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Last edited by SkyWatcher; 09-13-2017 at 03:51 PM.
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2017, 08:02 PM
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Sawt2 Sawt2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyWatcher View Post
Hi all, I've been making some experiments with heat generated in steel, using induction with coils.
I first tried a bunch of ferromagnetic and electrically conductive nails as a core and used my stingo pulser to see if any heat was created in the core.
Heat was created, though not much.
Then i tried a large 3/4" diameter by 6" long steel bolt, that created more heat within the core.
Was only using about 14 watts and collecting much of the power off the full wave bridge into 20 watt resistor.
I figured we want the biggest field change in the core, so i tried alternating current.
I was inspired to try these experiments, by looking at what little information their is about the Steorn hepha heater device, which apparently uses regular wall AC as the input.
I'm using various step down transformers i have on hand in these tests, to about 12-26 volts AC.
At around 26 watts shown on the killiwatt meter input from grid, it only takes a few minutes until the bolt core is getting too hot to touch and at 130 watts input from a little higher voltage transformer, the core gets too hot to touch in less than a minute.
I just picked up a 2 foot long, 3/4" dia. steel threaded rod, i plan to mount a coil in the middle and see how that heats up.
Then the idea is, to add aluminum heat sink fins along the length of the rod and also if needed, add a couple more coils at equal points on steel rod.
Your thoughts are welcome.
peace love light
Sky
That sounds very interesting.
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Old 09-14-2017, 06:32 PM
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Hi sawt2, thanks for the reply, it does seem interesting and does seem very efficient.
I was studying copper magnet wire to be sure it can handle the temperatures my test setup is climbing to, apparently most of the new copper magnet wire, the outer coating can handle at least 300 F..
So it may be ok, maybe the large coil i have in one spot should be divided up and placed in multiple spots on the steel rod, to spread the induction and encourage heat dissipation on any given coil position.
I placed a temperature sensor just outside the coil and using 140 watts AC input, from 80 F., it reaches 150 F. in 5 minutes and 205 F. in 9 minutes.
Here is pic of me setup at the moment.
peace love light



Here is an article describing the Steorn hepha heater tech that i am trying to emulate.

Quote:
"In this paper the author describes a very simple configuration that involves a coil wrapped around a nickel core (that is both magnetic and conductive) acting as an inductor. The coil and core is placed in a calorimeter composed of a vacuum chamber. Two thermocouples measure the temperature of the coil itself, and the temperature of the air in the room. A metered power supply provides the input power to the coil, and an oscilloscope monitors the current, voltage, and can also calculate total input power by using a math function of the scope.

The purpose of the test is to determine if the coil fed with a quantity of AC power, can produce more heat than the same coil fed with the same quantity of DC power. In the paper, the formula needed to calculate the total AC power is presented. The AC input and DC input is configured to be as identical as possible. Actually, the power input during the AC run was .9 (point nine) watts, and in the DC run it was 1 (one) watt. The fact that the input power during the AC run was slightly less than in the DC run actually biases the test against the AC run. This makes the results of the test even more significant.

In the first test, 1 watt of DC power is fed into the coil wound around the nickel core. The temperature of the coil increases until it reaches an equilibrium point of 36.1 degrees. This is the point at which the power lost by the coil via heat dissipation matches the electrical input power. Even if the input power stayed on for hours longer, the temperature of the coil would not increase above this temperature.

In the second test, .9 watts is fed into the same coil wound around the same exact nickel core. Obviously, this test took place a period of time after the first one, after the temperature of the coil has dropped back to its original value. The result of AC being fed into the coil is that it rises to an equilibrium temperature of 41.1 degrees. This means that in the AC test, the temperature of the coil reached a temperature five degrees higher than in the DC test.

The higher equilibrium temperature obtained when the coil was powered with AC, indicates an anomalous gain of energy. The gain of energy is unexplainable, because the input power in both tests were almost identical -- actually slightly less when AC was utilized. As the paper continues, the author indicates that resistive heating cannot be the case for the increased temperature in the AC test run.

Here is the conclusion found at the end of the paper.

"The extra heating effect under the application of an AC signal is not explained simply by the transfer of input power to the coil. Consideration of the energy input to the system does not account for the energy output -- as evidenced by the steady state temperature; there is an extra effect which needs to be isolated and identified.

"This investigation has not been able to suggest a reason for the energy output from the AC case. While it has been demonstrated and verified, and the DC case shows resistive heating as expected, there is no such simple explanation for the behavior of the coil under AC heating."

The conclusion must be that this is an energy output which is higher than would be expected from the power input, and caused by the response of the coil to the alternating signal."

It seems likely that this "extra effect" is part of Steorn's magnetic overunity effect that allows for the production of free energy. After many months of hearing little about Steorn's progress developing the Orbo technology, it is refreshing to read a report that demonstrates a clear, simple, and obvious gain of energy -- in this case, in the form of heat."
By the way, the degrees quoted in article, are in celsius.

Also, the whole coil and steel core assembly i am testing, weighs 5 lbs 5.5 oz.
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Last edited by SkyWatcher; 09-14-2017 at 06:53 PM.
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  #4  
Old 09-14-2017, 06:57 PM
RoliK RoliK is offline
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Sounds very interessting.
You can try to messure the heat energy with the help of water.
Remove the temperature sensors, then you should be able to put your steel rod into a for example 10l water bottle. Note the water temp at start, heat ut up to 20K more and log how many electricity this setup used.
The heat ebefgy you can calculate online from Water heating time calculator - Process Heating Services Ltd.

Regards Roland

English is not my main language.....
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