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  #31  
Old 01-08-2015, 10:39 PM
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Sputins Sputins is offline
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Nice work SkyWatcher… Tiny coils, tiny battery & big light!

By the looks of it, it’s just using just a single AA battery? (Just check to see if it still works if you remove the tiny magnets holding the leads to the battery). Does the feedback coil, feedback from the primary or the secondary coils?

Perhaps preserve this proto-type - make it look cute and tidy, mount it in a nice housing or small box. The housing could be made and the LED bulb mounted on top and make for a practical desk lamp.

Make further refinements with proto-type 2. Make an identical one and make it work just as well. Un-make it and measure the lengths of wire for each coil etc. Then some calculations can be made, perhaps then optimised even further.

Then try slowly up-scaling?

It’s kind of like a tiny little cosmic induction generator?
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  #32  
Old 01-08-2015, 11:13 PM
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Hi sputins, thanks for the kind words and good suggestions.
It's a lithium ion cell, salvaged from a lap top battery, 3.7 volts typically, though i was using one that was a little discharged, 3.5 volts.
It is fairly efficient, when compared to the flyback ferrite core i have in a lamp, though this design keep in mind, the input lowers when loaded.
Though to get a better idea, i will use a sensor from a solar garden light and compare with it plugged into wall power.
peace love light
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  #33  
Old 01-08-2015, 11:59 PM
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Hi folks, i tested the light output using the sensor from the solar led light.
It showed that this setup as it is now, is outputting half the output compared to plugged into the wall.
And at 2.15 watts, that is 105 lumens per watt, not terrible, but not great, whereas 3 watts should be needed for this light output.
It was drawing less current before, though this battery has a little more voltage and before it was using only one wire from each secondary coil, so maybe I'll try that again.
Again, the whole point of the opposite wound secondaries was to see lenz not reflected back to the input and this does exhibit that.
I think what you are saying sputin, is that this can probably be tweaked for much higher efficiency with the right core (probably closed core) and other variables.
peace love light
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  #34  
Old 01-09-2015, 06:06 AM
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Hi sputins, just realized i didn't answer you completely.
The feedback is from the primary or the trigger wire of the bifilar.

I went to home depot tonight and bought 4 more of the 6 watt ecosmart 40 watt equivalent led bulbs, to make some tests.
I wired 3 in parallel and they all light to good brightness and the amp draw stays exactly the same as with one led bulb, .62 amps at 3.47 volts.
Each bulb is not as bright as one, though with the sensor, whem using just one bulb, as said, it is 50 percent the brightness of it powered from the wall.
Though with 3 in parallel, each led bulb is 30 percent of full brightness, though we have 3 being lighted to such brightness, so it's outputting alot of light, meaning more efficient.
I am surprised the amp draw is remaining so rock soild, though i never really hooked multiple led bulbs in parallel before with circuits like these, so i can't say it isn't normal.
Also, the 3 bulbs are being powered from one wire from each secondary coil.
Your thoughts welcome.
Here is a pic of them lighted.



peace love light
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Last edited by SkyWatcher; 01-09-2015 at 06:11 AM.
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  #35  
Old 01-09-2015, 06:42 AM
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Okay I think I understand, kinda like the Bedini bifilar trigger. Thanks for the clarification.

I’ve got the ferrite cores, the transistor, a battery and the wire…

I might just have to build one too!

(Yeah I meant before certain optimisation could be done, there may be an optimised length of secondary or core type and size, how many windings on the primary (impedance) etc. But starting with something that works well is always good!

Nice to see now three LED’s illuminated!
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  #36  
Old 01-09-2015, 02:10 PM
Wistiti Wistiti is offline
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Hi Sky.
Did you try to rectify the output and charge a battery with it?
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  #37  
Old 01-09-2015, 05:14 PM
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Hi folks, Hi wist, no i have not tried charging a battery with the secondaries output, i don't think i have a battery here with a high enough voltage.
Unless i put a few lithium ion in series to try and charge.
Do you think i should test that wist?
peace love light
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  #38  
Old 01-09-2015, 05:47 PM
Gav Gav is offline
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hi Sky
using the same coil I mentioned earlier with the secondary layed on top of the primary (only the half of secondary that is in same direction) I was able to recharge a 3.6v battery using a single 1.5v AA battery, I have 2 3.6v batterys that are the same, (from inside old monitors) I am currently trying to recharge the second from the same AA battery
first battery now reads 3.6v so will be interesting to see what the second will read before the circuit dies?
first battery read 2v and second battery reads 1.5 before charging
Gav
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  #39  
Old 01-09-2015, 06:42 PM
Wistiti Wistiti is offline
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Hi Sky and Gav!
With my replication (the same as Gav but with a 10k pot not a 50k) i rectify the output with an homemade fast switching bridge rectifier, 4 x uf 5408.
I use 2x aa battery as input (near 3,2v) at the output i can read around 140vdc... As i said before im not able to light a 120v led before or after the bridge... But i plug the output on a 12v powerbox battery that read 12,50v.
The next morning i unplug everything and my input aa battery read near 1,7v and my 12v bat read 12,76v!! it's quite surprise me... but at the end of the day my big battery read 12,52...
Anyway, just to see the input power drop when a load is connected to it, say there is moore to investigate...
Ciao!
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  #40  
Old 01-09-2015, 07:05 PM
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Hi wist, thanks for sharing, i've never had much luck with blocking oscillator flyback, when trying to charge a higher voltage battery from a lower voltage battery.
Though a capacitor dump might work better in that case.
Other wise, using a higher voltage input battery, like 1.2-2 volts over and only using the flyback with one diode, would probably work best.
Wist, are you observing the reduced input current under load?
peace love light
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  #41  
Old 01-09-2015, 08:19 PM
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Hi folks, ok this is just an update and refresher.
I hooked the 3 parallel led bulbs to only one partnered secondary coil, the one directly underneath the bifilar primary and it did not light any of the bulbs and the amp draw increased a bit, from .91 amps to .93 amps at 3.88 volts.
Then, hooked one particular wire from each secondary and they lighted to good brightness and the amp draw lowered to .67 amps.
So, my next experiment will be to add another layer of 30awg. wire over each separate partnered secondary coil, so as to gain more voltage to see if the led bulbs can be lighted to a higher output level and see what happens to amp draw.
This way, i will not have to unwind the existing secondaries and only have to unwind the thicker wire bifilar.
Your thoughts are very welcome.
peace love light
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  #42  
Old 01-10-2015, 06:46 AM
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Efficiency Update

Hi folks, adding the additional coil layer to each separate partnered secondary coil has increased efficiency.
All 3 led bulbs are lighted to a higher brightness level and it can be detected with the eyes and the sensor proves this as well.
The sensor is showing that each bulb is 34 percent of full brightness, previously it was 30 percent.
The input has lowered as well, at 3.88 volts-.59 amps or 2.29 watts, previous watt input was 2.6 watts.
I'm not entirely sure how the light units compare with my sensor readings, though if we calculate 34 percent of full brightness per bulb, that works out to aorund 153 lumens per led bulb.
That works out to 459 lumens or around 200 lumens per watt.
I wonder how much more efficient this would be with a more closed ferrite core, like a typical tv flyback core.
Anyway, so far, this seems to be one very efficient setup.
Imagine if those 140 lumen per watt tubes were used, this setup could output 850 lumens or 371 lumens per watt.
peace love light
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  #43  
Old 01-10-2015, 08:53 AM
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Skywatcher

Have you tried running your load in between the secondaries, and earth grounding one end of your secondaries, while using an aerial capacitance on the other end?
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  #44  
Old 01-10-2015, 09:10 AM
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Skywatcher
It might also be advantageous to put a single capacitive plate on the free end of each secondarie coil just like Tesla did.
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Last edited by rosehillworks; 01-10-2015 at 09:15 AM.
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  #45  
Old 01-10-2015, 06:50 PM
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Hi rosehill, i have powered the led bulbs between the secondaries, one wire from each secondary as posted previously and it is wired that way now.
Though i have not run a wire to ground off other end or an aerial off other end of other coil.
Thoguh that sounds like a good experiment.
Do you think 30 awg. magnet wire would be enough for these ground and aerial connections. I have a big roll of that wire size and could run it outside i think, through door and close door, it's very cold here now.
peace love light
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  #46  
Old 01-10-2015, 07:46 PM
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30 again should be fine.
http://jnaudin.free.fr/html/afeptstr.htm


Here is a sketch of what I was thinking.


1420918889251.jpg
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  #47  
Old 01-11-2015, 07:10 AM
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Hi rosehill, I am studying your information a bit and will be trying some things soon.
Though for the moment, i decided to try one more led bulb in parallel, total of 4 and the efficiency increased further.
Each bulb according to the sensor is now outputting around 29 percent of full brightness.
This works out to 522 lumens at 2.25 input watts for 232 lumens per watt.
Keep in mind, these led bulbs are rated at 75 lumens per watt when plugged into the wall.
So this setup is 3 times more efficient at outputting usable light, well so far, i do have one more bulb on hand i could add.
peace love light
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  #48  
Old 01-11-2015, 09:32 AM
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hello all
I made a replication as close as I could.

Core: 5 ferrite beads
secondary: each 174 turns / 26 AWG / total 348 turns
Primary: bifilar 48 turns x2 / 22 AWG
power supply fixed at 3.5 V DC
Resistor: 1K variable / graduated at 640 ohm
Transistor: 2N3055
Load: LED lamp 220-240 V / 7W / 50-60Hz

Best apparent luminosity - input ratio: 0.3 Amp / frequency unknown

The camera do not show the real amount of light emitted by the lamp.
Compared with normal input from grid it is quite dim.
Anyway much fun, will try variations

Thanks Sky Watcher
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File Type: jpg Bucking 01.jpg (110.3 KB, 80 views)
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  #49  
Old 01-12-2015, 12:01 AM
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Hi interdesign, thanks for sharing.
Did you wind the secondaries in opposite directions?
Are you observing reduction of input when loaded with bulb? which is the reason it is setup this way, thanks.
peace love light
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  #50  
Old 01-12-2015, 09:50 AM
interdesign21 interdesign21 is offline
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Hi Sky
My setup indeed has the secondary winded in Bucking mode. same as you show in your posts. The primary winded over one of the paired secondary. same schematic as yours, except the resistor is variable 1K. (and the led lamp 7W 220V)
There is a sweet spot playing with resistance were the input amps decrease, and the light
increases. (I guess related to the particular number of turns in windings)

[B]Sorry I forgot to mention this most significant aspect, YES there is a slight reduction in input amperage when loaded. (my PS is regulated at 3,5 volts).[/B]

I also made another setup with a flyback ferrite core (as suggested by you):

secondary:440 turns each paired coils/ AWG 31
primary: 110 turns bifilar (220T) AWG 26 /winded over one of the paired sec.
Unloaded: 0,15 A
Loaded: 0,1 A
I dont have an oscope, so no way to see wave, freq, nor output real specs.

This is the first time I find such a behavior in a secondary.

I´ll think to apply this in other setups, I cannot explain it with the accepted rules.
May be some expert reading here, will be kind to provide a logical explanation.

Thanks
Alvaro
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File Type: jpg Bucking 02.jpg (133.1 KB, 83 views)
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  #51  
Old 01-12-2015, 11:07 AM
interdesign21 interdesign21 is offline
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hello
must add another quick test result (with same flyback setup)
from secondary out to a bridge rectifier to a 470uF-350V electrolytic cap shorted with a 100 ohm/3W resistor:
input jumps from 0.1 A to 0.2 A (volts out between resistor leads, 0.9 V)

IMHO the type of load is determinant.
cheers
Alvaro
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  #52  
Old 01-12-2015, 04:33 PM
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Hi interdesign, thanks for sharing your results.
Yes, i have found it likes a certain type of load.
I think using the right load, each secondary coil is self oscillating between the other secondary coil.
This self oscillation is mentioned in the pdf by chris sykes also.
And i'm not speaking of the bifilar oscillator, the secondaries themselves, start to oscillate back and forth between each other.
This can be seen in the led bulbs.
When that oscillation becomes too slow, literally, when using 2 led bulbs, each one turns on and off, one on then off, then other on and off, etc. in perfect timing, like a car turn signal.
Though with proper setup, the oscillation cannot be seen.
This might be why a certain loads draws more amps, it's killing that back and forth oscillation.
peace love light
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Last edited by SkyWatcher; 01-12-2015 at 04:36 PM.
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  #53  
Old 01-12-2015, 05:25 PM
Gav Gav is offline
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Hi Sky
the battery I recharged sat at 3.67v after resting, when I used it the voltage dropped right down so there was no real charge
I also found that my coil puts out a wireless energy field, might be because I have the secondary on top of the primary, so there would be a lot of loss. I will make another and buy an led bulb
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  #54  
Old 01-12-2015, 09:25 PM
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Hi gav, if you are trying to charge a higher voltage battery with a lower voltage one, that is difficult without a capacitor dump.
Batteries need the right mix of voltage and current to charge and power under load.
Well, i tried another ferrite bead oscillator i had with a regular single wound secondary, was using it previously to light gutted cfl's.
It also exhibits lowered amp draw when led bulbs are attached to secondary as load, so not sure what to think, though i will give it some thought.
peace love light
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  #55  
Old 01-14-2015, 05:26 AM
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Hi folks, well i decided to see how a regular single secondary compares to the separate bucking coils.
I used 24awg. magnet wire for the one layer secondary and 24awg. for the primary bifilar.
I achieved similar efficiency in the 3 volt range.
When using 11 volt input range, efficiency increased, 225 lumens per watt at 1.8 watt input using 3 led bulbs in parallel.
Will be testing to try and increase efficiency further, maybe higher voltage input will give even better results and more bulbs.
peace love light
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  #56  
Old 01-14-2015, 07:58 AM
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Skywatcher

The idea behind bucking coils is that you can put any load or even short the output and it will still consume the same amount of current in primary side. I doesn't mean it could power whatever you wish on secondary side
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  #57  
Old 01-14-2015, 08:41 PM
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Hi boguslaw, thanks for sharing the information.
Though with my setup, if the bucking secondaries are shorted, the current increases greatly.
I did wind a 1-1/4" ferrite toroid with bucking coils and bifilar, and the coils are inline, meaning none on top of another.
So maybe a little more testing with the toroid inline version may show no increase when shorted, we'll see.
peace love light
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  #58  
Old 01-16-2015, 10:13 PM
Wistiti Wistiti is offline
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Hi Sky and everyone!
Maybe we could have some help here: Partnered Output Coils - Free Energy
Ciao!
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  #59  
Old 01-16-2015, 10:34 PM
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Hi wist, thanks for link, until i have something a little more conclusive, i will just post here my tests.
I am going to wind another ferrite bead core, this time i will use 24awg. magnet wire for partnered secondary coils, then again 24awg. magnet wire on top for bifilar oscillator or also try some door bell wire later for loose coupling.
This will be a lower ratio, closer to the 1 to 3 winding ratio.
I will attempt to verify the lack of stepped down current, when the voltage is stepped up, as chris says this should happen.
peace love light
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  #60  
Old 01-19-2015, 12:06 AM
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Hi voltan, thanks for sharing the circuits and information.
I'm studying them.
Have you built any of these or anything similar to the bucking coil idea, as chris sykes is showing.
Would love to hear about any results from anyone.
Still making experiments, I'm not sure the blocking oscillator is the right way to run this setup, maybe it needs the simple inverter style circuit, for more sine wave than square wave.
peace love light
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