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Bedini solid state oscillator and Tesla switch combination

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  • quantumuppercut
    replied
    Originally posted by SkyWatcher View Post
    Hi folks, Hi quantum, are you saying to still use the tesla switch type method, where we say use 24 volt, 2 - 12 volt in series charging 12 volt, 2 - 12 volt in parallel and then we use the collapsing field of coil to charge multiple 12 volt batteries in series.
    Or are you saying to try, say a 12 volt battery for input and charge many 12 volt batteries in series from single diode flyback charge.
    I thought I have tried that in past, though maybe the batteries would need to be smaller amp hour capacity for the charging end and then use many of those in series to equal same watt hour equivalent of the larger 12 volt input battery.

    For example, If we used a 12 volt-7 amp/hour input battery and if we were to use say 1.2 volt AA rechargeable cells for flyback charging, we would need around 35 AA's in series to equal similar watt/hour energy capability as that of the input battery.
    What you are saying makes much sense quantum, i guess we just have to test this out and see how it performs.
    The reason I mention lower capacity cells in the charge position, is because I seem to recall from past experiments, that putting a bunch of equal capacity, in this case, 12 volt-7 amp/hour batteries in the series charging position, they do not charge well, probably because that load requires too much current, which the collapsing coil field does not contain.
    Though using lower capacity cells for charging, just might enable us to charge those efficiently with the low current flyback charge, whether or not we use the tesla switch type method or not.
    Hope this helps and your thoughts appreciated and I will be testing this in some form.
    peace love light
    tyson
    Hi Sky,

    The extreme of my thought would be using a 1.2V battery providing energy and several batteries in series for charging. Using high voltage charging means you won't get much current flow through, but I think the trade back is many batteries charge at the same time. Frequency maybe use to accelerate the process. The voltage depends on the rate of current collapse so may need as low on time as possible and open it as fast/clean as possible. I think the key here is to suppress input current and only use its rate of change. Still trying to do some experiment to see if this is valid. Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • SkyWatcher
    replied
    Hi folks, Hi quantum, are you saying to still use the tesla switch type method, where we say use 24 volt, 2 - 12 volt in series charging 12 volt, 2 - 12 volt in parallel and then we use the collapsing field of coil to charge multiple 12 volt batteries in series.
    Or are you saying to try, say a 12 volt battery for input and charge many 12 volt batteries in series from single diode flyback charge.
    I thought I have tried that in past, though maybe the batteries would need to be smaller amp hour capacity for the charging end and then use many of those in series to equal same watt hour equivalent of the larger 12 volt input battery.

    For example, If we used a 12 volt-7 amp/hour input battery and if we were to use say 1.2 volt AA rechargeable cells for flyback charging, we would need around 35 AA's in series to equal similar watt/hour energy capability as that of the input battery.
    What you are saying makes much sense quantum, i guess we just have to test this out and see how it performs.
    The reason I mention lower capacity cells in the charge position, is because I seem to recall from past experiments, that putting a bunch of equal capacity, in this case, 12 volt-7 amp/hour batteries in the series charging position, they do not charge well, probably because that load requires too much current, which the collapsing coil field does not contain.
    Though using lower capacity cells for charging, just might enable us to charge those efficiently with the low current flyback charge, whether or not we use the tesla switch type method or not.
    Hope this helps and your thoughts appreciated and I will be testing this in some form.
    peace love light
    tyson

    Leave a comment:


  • Muon
    replied
    Originally posted by quantumuppercut View Post
    Hi Muon,

    I think the joule thief circuit is good. My argument is we should connect a bunch of batteries in series to charge, the more the better and use high voltage from collapsing field for charging.

    Thanks
    Well and succinctly put, quantum-- and I agree. This seems to be a KEY idea, I agree -- to collect the "high voltage from collapsing field for charging". A good summary.
    Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • quantumuppercut
    replied
    Originally posted by Muon View Post
    Are the inductors connected, as in a Joule thief circuit, or are they independent? I admit I don't understand this circuit really -- can someone please show a photo of their recent set-up? That would help us trying to learn.
    And -- best wishes for your success!
    Hi Muon,

    I think the joule thief circuit is good. My argument is we should connect a bunch of batteries in series to charge, the more the better and use high voltage from collapsing field for charging.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Muon
    replied
    Originally posted by quantumuppercut View Post
    This seems similar to a Tesla switch. Hm... a bit odd. It looks backward to me. I've done some analysis with capacitors and saw that energy and charge can be interchange to get one more than the other by changing capacitance.

    Let's say you have 2 capacitors at 1F and 1V.
    In series you have 1/2F 2 volts. q= CV = 1 . Energy E = 1/2CV^2 = 1
    In parallel you have 2F 1 volt. q = CV = 2 . Energy E = 1/2CV^2 = 1

    If q is the amount of discharge from cap/battery, why would we want to connect them in series. According to this, if total q is the current flow in the circuit and conserved, wouldn't we want to charge in series?

    Overall, I think the correct set up is discharge in parallel, charge in series.
    Are the inductors connected, as in a Joule thief circuit, or are they independent? I admit I don't understand this circuit really -- can someone please show a photo of their recent set-up? That would help us trying to learn.
    And -- best wishes for your success!

    Leave a comment:


  • mbrownn
    replied
    Originally posted by 49er View Post
    Hi mbrownn and All

    The second installment to the TS . Start voltage run 25.6 and charge 12.14 volts with 3.5 Hz and .7 ma. It ran 157 hrs and the end run 23.7 charge 13.57 volts. Do we need more info , I have started round 2 same set of batteries but it looks to me as we are not gaining in voltage or capacity.

    Doug
    Once you have the batteries all performing well we can do the real tests.

    Calculate the total energy used to charge the batteries, then measure the total energy that has to be drawn out of the batteries to bring them back down. The best results will be at a C20 charge or discharge rate. Divide the first figure by the second and you have the COP. There is no point doing this with defective batteries as the COP will be always low.

    Leave a comment:


  • 49er
    replied
    Hi mbrownn and All

    The second installment to the TS . Start voltage run 25.6 and charge 12.14 volts with 3.5 Hz and .7 ma. It ran 157 hrs and the end run 23.7 charge 13.57 volts. Do we need more info , I have started round 2 same set of batteries but it looks to me as we are not gaining in voltage or capacity.

    Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • Guruji
    replied
    Msg

    There is something going on to this circuit ; charging gets up fast. I want to see if I manage to charge four batteries to themselves. This is would be a great achievment. Fingers crossed.

    Leave a comment:


  • quantumuppercut
    replied
    Originally posted by nilrehob View Post
    Sounds great!
    Did you also try this one (the one to the right)?



    Two batteries in series to drive it, and the rest in parallel charging.

    /Hob
    This seems similar to a Tesla switch. Hm... a bit odd. It looks backward to me. I've done some analysis with capacitors and saw that energy and charge can be interchange to get one more than the other by changing capacitance.

    Let's say you have 2 capacitors at 1F and 1V.
    In series you have 1/2F 2 volts. q= CV = 1 . Energy E = 1/2CV^2 = 1
    In parallel you have 2F 1 volt. q = CV = 2 . Energy E = 1/2CV^2 = 1

    If q is the amount of discharge from cap/battery, why would we want to connect them in series. According to this, if total q is the current flow in the circuit and conserved, wouldn't we want to charge in series?

    Overall, I think the correct set up is discharge in parallel, charge in series.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guruji
    replied
    Msg

    Originally posted by 49er View Post
    Hi mbrownn and all

    First test with T105's with switch open

    Start run voltage 26.4 (13.3 & 13.1) charge voltage 12.36
    It ran 91 hrs. this is bifiler litz 18awg Air coil with 2n3055 1-1n4001 1-1n5408 and had 177 ohms on the trigger drawing .730MA
    End run voltage 24.1 (12.1 & 12.0) charge voltage 13.77
    now to do the turn around and start over. I think this work's great to desulfate batteries.

    Doug
    Hi 49er interesting results. What if you used the normal SSG would it be with same results? One should check about the difference of the two setups.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Leave a comment:


  • 49er
    replied
    Hi mbrownn and all

    First test with T105's with switch open

    Start run voltage 26.4 (13.3 & 13.1) charge voltage 12.36
    It ran 91 hrs. this is bifiler litz 18awg Air coil with 2n3055 1-1n4001 1-1n5408 and had 177 ohms on the trigger drawing .730MA
    End run voltage 24.1 (12.1 & 12.0) charge voltage 13.77
    now to do the turn around and start over. I think this work's great to desulfate batteries.

    Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • 49er
    replied
    Hi Guruji

    The switch closed, I didn't like it used up too many batteries before it charged the ones that I first put on. But the switch open I have had good luck with that one, just haven't posted yet. I wanted to get more data first. The one thing I can tell you the closer you match the batteries in amp hours the better you can see the balance of the power.

    The more I work with this design I believe it is not a Tesla switch but a Oscillation circuit. Still trying to figure the 24v over 12v but I do know it is working very well. I am working with bigger batteries T105's know and waiting for the end of the first half and do a flip. I also have set the frequency to 3.5Hz when charging so no mater what amps go in at least the frequency is the same.

    Doug

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  • Guruji
    replied
    Originally posted by 49er View Post
    There were 3 300cca (42)ah and 1 -18 ah. 12v side was 12.66 and 24.4v on the source side with the switch open. source 2x 300cca charge 1-18 & 1-300cca. Will start the switch closed today Doug
    Any results on switch closed 49er?
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Guruji
    replied
    Working

    Yes I managed to make this circuit work at last
    I think the problem was the pot not the lenght of the coils cause I used my original bedini circuit which is about 6ohms on pulse coil.
    My pot was 1k and now changed it to 4.7k. When I turned it high up it began oscillation.
    Voltage have risen very fast I noticed on charge batteries. Should see charge batteries hold the charge now when they reach the right voltage.
    Thanks to all that tried to help.

    Leave a comment:


  • 49er
    replied
    Hi Guruji


    I use only 100 ' per strand I think about .6 ohms
    hope it helps

    Doug

    Leave a comment:

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