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Nine Points for Synthesizing Electricity

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  • #16
    Originally posted by bistander View Post

    Bingo.

    Ground.


    Exactly what the definition of electric circuit "ground" is. A reference node.
    Aha!
    A common ground!

    Originally posted by bistander View Post
    A point. Look it up. Dictionary, or Wikipedia. So how can energy be "lost" in a point?
    If the point, or node, in question refers to an earth ground… Then it is lost to the earth because the earth ground is not merely a node...it’s a function.
    ​​​​
    This sounds like a miscommunication to me…
    Originally posted by bistander View Post


    Regards,
    bi

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Vinyasi View Post

      Aha!
      A common ground!



      If the point, or node, in question refers to an earth ground… Then it is lost to the earth because the earth ground is not merely a node...it’s a function.
      ​​​​
      This sounds like a miscommunication to me…

      Please share from where this comes.

      earth ground is not merely a node...it’s a function
      ​​​​
      Also, IIRC, Turion's quote was in a discussion about a battery system. I remember replying that ground was arbitrary at the discretion of the circuit designer, not always the negative, as in Ford model A 6 volt battery positive chassis (body) ground.

      The term "ground" in electric circuit context can be a verb in which case it refers to connecting to the common node of the circuit designated as ground, a node, often the chassis or return path when such path is of adequate conductance as to offer negligible potential difference.

      I'm pretty sure I asked Turion (and Matt, at the time) for explanation and example but just got insults. So maybe I'll have better luck with you. Please provide technical reference and examples. Thank you.
      Regards,
      bi

      just for reference;
      In electrical engineering, ground or earth is a reference point in an electrical circuit from which voltages are measured, a common return path for electric current, or a direct physical connection to the earth. Electrical circuits may be connected to ground for several reasons. Wikipedia

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      • #18
        SparkGap_macro_with_text.jpg

        The zero voltage of V1 (in Micro-Cap’s macro for a neon bulb spark gap) is serving as an earth ground (not as a common ground) since it retains its function as a regulator of voltage at that node.

        All voltage sources double as regulators of voltage since that is their definition. Earth ground is also a regulator of voltage since it has sufficient capacitance to override any man made voltage connected to it with its own value of electrostatic potential. This is how we can “lose“ an electrostatic potential to an earth ground as well as through a battery (of sufficiently enlarged capacitance for entertaining lots of amp-hours). Since current is nothing more than a mathematical shorthand for a change in voltage over time due to resistance, current is also susceptible to a grounded loss; or, why else would we provide an earth ground port within our electric outlets?

        Hint.....as an aside...

        Ohm’s Law is normally taught in the form of a shorthand notation in which power equals voltage times current. Yet, current is a variable which substitutes for voltage divided by resistance. This makes the true and correct version of Ohm’s Law rendered as power equals the square of voltage divided by resistance. The first voltage is applied voltage (that which gets applied to the terminals of a component flanking it on either side by two adjacent nodes). The second voltage is the one which changes over time creating the illusion of current which we recognize due to our intellectual tendency for lumping together complex changes as a distinct behavioral pattern. Anything else is a convenience for the technician who wants to measure current occurring as a concept to simplify our conception of electrodynamic time. But this ruins our opportunity to fully understand Ohm’s Law.

        Common ground may not be a regulator of voltage since its voltage may rise or fall if it cannot also function as an endless sinkhole for electrostatic charge by entertaining an enlarged capacitance.

        Batteries are not perfect regulators of voltage since their voltage drops as they become depleted. A/C voltage sources maintain their voltage more or less within tolerable limits.

        This is how to create an artificial earth ground by inserting a very large battery into a circuit and ground one of its terminals.

        These statements may elicit a yawn from my audience because this is how we construct a conventional circuit. But I do not craft conventional simulations of circuits. So, this elicits a “wow” from me!
        Last edited by Vinyasi; 10-22-2021, 06:31 PM.

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