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  • Originally posted by mr.clean View Post
    hi all, i havent been working on the Smith stuff for a while, i may return to it but i have been working mainly on Magnifying Transmitter stuff.
    Just wanting to share here cause its such a mix anyway
    pt 15 TMT Magnifying Transmitter, Toroid, Filter, 3 mA Current draw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvsOrFpbK68
    Hi mr. clean. Long time no talk. How are things?
    It looks to me like you have your scope set to AC input coupling.
    When you are measuring current draw from your battery, you need to have your scope set to 'DC' input coupling. Looking at the screen of your scope, it appears to be set to 'AC' input coupling (the sinewave symbol at the bottom). AC input coupling blocks DC, so your scope only sees AC. When measuring the current from the battery there will primarily be DC current plus any AC ripple on top of the DC input current. You therefore need to set your scope to DC coupling. You should pretty much always use a DC input coupling setting when making measurements as that shows everything (both DC and AC) that exists at the measurement point. Using AC input coupling is only for special cases where you want to block any DC component at the measurement point and only see any AC component that is there.
    Last edited by level; 12-02-2014, 02:36 PM.
    level

    Comment


    • good point

      Originally posted by level View Post
      Hi mr. clean. Long time no talk. How are things?
      It looks to me like you have your scope set to AC input coupling.
      When you are measuring current draw from your battery, you need to have your scope set to 'DC' input coupling. Looking at the screen of your scope, it appears to be set to 'AC' input coupling (the sinewave symbol at the bottom). AC input coupling blocks DC, so your scope only sees AC. When measuring the current from the battery there will primarily be DC current plus any AC ripple on top of the DC input current. You therefore need to set your scope to DC coupling. You should pretty much always use a DC input coupling setting when making measurements as that shows everything (both DC and AC) that exists at the measurement point. Using AC input coupling is only for special cases where you want to block any DC component at the measurement point and only see any AC component that is there.
      thats a very good point, and i just went back and checked..

      it does read 2 mA higher in the DC setting... will update the next video
      In the beginner's mind, there are many possibilities.
      In the expert's mind there are few.
      -Shunryu Suzuki

      Comment


      • Originally posted by BroMikey View Post
        I think it was Duncan I saw doing something like this. Keeping an eye on your work. I have a lot to learn but will catch up.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuoISZAlFAc

        From what i gather the input coil or filter or choke helps helps keep the energy going in the right direction?

        Also the 3ma draw? at 12vdc= .003 X 12 = .036 or 1/27th of a watt and it looks like you are getting 20 watts of light.

        Thanks for all the hard work man, I don't take you for granted.

        Mikey

        PS just watched the video I posted about TIGER telling the real story of how synchronizing the transmitter and receivers is done or how a nuclear response is achieved. At this point a large 1 microfarad cap will suck up a huge amount of energy from the ground (Earth ground?)

        LOL thanks but no maybe if they ran conventionally, about 3 watts max on each light board.. but its more the appearance of power, and as small oscillators go, they dont do low volt high current. which is the goal.

        And like Level said the reading is off, but its not by much.

        Very cool about synchronizing the receiver, Akula says the same. any links for that?
        In the beginner's mind, there are many possibilities.
        In the expert's mind there are few.
        -Shunryu Suzuki

        Comment


        • Originally posted by mr.clean View Post
          thats a very good point, and i just went back and checked..
          it does read 2 mA higher in the DC setting... will update the next video
          That's still not too bad.
          level

          Comment


          • For you?

            You know what I am like so yeah, when I find the links I will post them. I was thinking that your tiny hair like wire was the synchronizing connection

            Well that video I posted was Wesley talking about Akula and the Kapagen at the end. Wes said these guys don't give everything so TIGER is giving us more.

            In the video the primary being pulsed (We will say a tl494 or tl594) then on the other end (Not the secondary) there is a receiver setup and he goes on with a picture drawing. The receiver has a pulse circuit to stimulate the function of just keeping it energized/ready for collection but is in sync with the front end chip.


            He claims that if the transmitter chip is in sync with the receiver chip (with no doubt a tuning method caps, resistors) that the magic will begin to appear.

            I heard that before

            But in this case I think that it is real not just drama.

            Of course we all know how easy it is to sync a pair of tl494's.

            Like I said when I find more I will post what these guys found out.

            Great work Clean, keep getting your kicks off the higher learning, you are a genius.

            Mikey





            Originally posted by mr.clean View Post
            LOL thanks but no maybe if they ran conventionally, about 3 watts max on each light board.. but its more the appearance of power, and as small oscillators go, they dont do low volt high current. which is the goal.

            And like Level said the reading is off, but its not by much.

            Very cool about synchronizing the receiver, Akula says the same. any links for that?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Khwartz View Post
              Hi Kurt!

              When I first saw your post and read it I said to myself: I will connect this guy with Kurt! Well, it was already you! Lol

              About your video:

              Very Nice result as used to

              I Very Like too your 1 ohm pure linear resistor and your little scope; these show how willing you are about to show trustfully results

              BTW, what is an "imput filter"? What for is it and how it works? Please.

              Then, which coils are connected with the tiny wire? The aluminum coils?

              Nice to see the same with light bulbs

              Best regards,
              Didier
              Hi Didier, an input filter is just to try to avoid high frequency waves from being active on the DC input rails.
              DrStiffler had shown a series of ferrites with bridging capacitors
              In the beginner's mind, there are many possibilities.
              In the expert's mind there are few.
              -Shunryu Suzuki

              Comment


              • Hi All,
                Been a long time since posting on this forum. Been doing some experimenting up in the mhz region.
                I dusted off the old ham rig to use as my source of power.
                It can put out 10 to 100 watts at many different frequencies with a digital read-out which makes it quite versatile for this job.
                Made two identical hv coils tuned to 3.4 mhz (just below the 80 meter ham band). My first problem was how to tune those coils to get a few kvs out.
                Just using a regular tank circuit only gives me about 200 volts
                Just adding more turns throws my frequency way off.
                Don says to wind the coils with 1/4, 1/2 or full wavelength wires.
                Well any Ham Radio operator (including me) will tell you that a 1/4 WL wire
                wound up into a coil is totally different from one stretched out in the open
                air. The frequency will go way down.
                Well I gave it a shot and got a big surprise. Not only did the output stay at 3.4mhz on my freq. counter, but my voltage rose to about 5 kvs!
                The funny thing was when I checked the coils resonant freq. using my scope & sig.generator it was at 1200 khz. So I guess we were both right.
                I am very thankful to Don Smith for teaching me something.
                Hope all the Hams on this thread learn from this also.

                Comment


                • could it be?

                  this video im sure has been up here before, but it is pretty convincing.
                  Apparently the builders name is Salty Citrus in China (so ive been told)

                  Anyway here it is again...

                  Don Smith replication (posted by Qwekw, but not built by him is the problem)
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vowN5BFGW1c
                  In the beginner's mind, there are many possibilities.
                  In the expert's mind there are few.
                  -Shunryu Suzuki

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Elcheapo View Post
                    Hi All,
                    Been a long time since posting on this forum. Been doing some experimenting up in the mhz region.
                    I dusted off the old ham rig to use as my source of power.
                    It can put out 10 to 100 watts at many different frequencies with a digital read-out which makes it quite versatile for this job.
                    Made two identical hv coils tuned to 3.4 mhz (just below the 80 meter ham band). My first problem was how to tune those coils to get a few kvs out.
                    Just using a regular tank circuit only gives me about 200 volts
                    Just adding more turns throws my frequency way off.
                    Don says to wind the coils with 1/4, 1/2 or full wavelength wires.
                    Well any Ham Radio operator (including me) will tell you that a 1/4 WL wire
                    wound up into a coil is totally different from one stretched out in the open
                    air. The frequency will go way down.
                    Well I gave it a shot and got a big surprise. Not only did the output stay at 3.4mhz on my freq. counter, but my voltage rose to about 5 kvs!
                    The funny thing was when I checked the coils resonant freq. using my scope & sig.generator it was at 1200 khz. So I guess we were both right.
                    I am very thankful to Don Smith for teaching me something.
                    Hope all the Hams on this thread learn from this also.
                    very cool, you do HAM stuff, ive been thinking of doing the test myself.
                    Anyway it is refreshing to hear that
                    Yes the 1/4 tuning is really a mind boggle for myself, then in places ive read Tesla say "1/4 of the initial disturbance" and also that the primary and secondary should be of the "same vibration".
                    The first is puzzling to me. but for sure from what ive seen they should ring the same

                    yes the resonator having self capacitance would always ring lower than straight wire (so make the coil shorter but then length is compromised )

                    It did look like Smith had tuned the primary to the (single) secondary, in the classic Smith board, that also confuses me. Plus the spark gap, it makes sense, but cant get much action unless the gap is inside the LC like normal spark drivers

                    Another thing is when i had the board done up almost identically to Don, my diodes were frying like hell (possible a good thing, but...
                    20mA@30,000v is 600 Watts of handling... so i doubled 2 more diodes in parallel.. and the problem persisted and all were on fire !!
                    So 1200 Watts of handling now and they were still failing. kept losing diodes and once that happened the out of phase coils would just power arc to eachother.
                    Anyway I should have just gotten better diodes, but went down other paths.
                    i am looking forward to more work on this again, despite the length of this thread
                    Last edited by mr.clean; 12-03-2014, 06:41 PM.
                    In the beginner's mind, there are many possibilities.
                    In the expert's mind there are few.
                    -Shunryu Suzuki

                    Comment


                    • Diodes

                      Ya, if those diodes aren't fast enough they'll act more like a resistor and surely
                      heat up.
                      For what I'm doing I'll need the ultra-fast ones.

                      Comment


                      • I have never seen speed specifications on microwave oven diodes, or any high voltage diode that I have
                        all the fast diodes I have are relatively low voltage rated
                        high speed and high voltage might be quite the trick
                        testing will show how fast they are,
                        but with high voltage it is quite easy to mess up and have your oscilloscope die,
                        I guess high voltage probes are available, but they are a bit pricey

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by mr.clean View Post
                          very cool, you do HAM stuff, ive been thinking of doing the test myself.
                          Another thing is when i had the board done up almost identically to Don, my diodes were frying like hell (possible a good thing, but...
                          20mA@30,000v is 600 Watts of handling... so i doubled 2 more diodes in parallel.. and the problem persisted and all were on fire !!
                          So 1200 Watts of handling now and they were still failing. kept losing diodes and once that happened the out of phase coils would just power arc to each other.



                          mr. clean, I had already explained to you previously that a diode rated for 20mA max and a peak inverse voltage of 30,000V doesn't mean the diode can dissipate 600W of power. The peak inverse voltage is the max voltage the diode can stand in the reverse direction before breaking down or failing. The power the diode dissipates is equal to the forward voltage drop across the diode times the forward current through the diode. The forward voltage drop across the diode is going to be a few volts to maybe 10V or a bit more depending on the diode. If you exceed the diodes max forward current rating it will overheat and fail. Most likely you were just exceeding the forward current rating of 20mA on the diodes, which caused them to blow.
                          You would need high speed diodes which can handle a lot more current, like some of the ones available from here (scroll through. There are four pages of diodes):
                          Diodes & Rectifiers - HV Stuff
                          Last edited by level; 12-04-2014, 03:25 AM.
                          level

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by level View Post



                            mr. clean, I had already explained to you previously that a diode rated for 20mA max and a peak inverse voltage of 30,000V doesn't mean the diode can dissipate 600W of power. The peak inverse voltage is the max voltage the diode can stand in the reverse direction before breaking down or failing. The power the diode dissipates is equal to the forward voltage drop across the diode times the forward current through the diode. The forward voltage drop across the diode is going to be a few volts to maybe 10V or a bit more depending on the diode. If you exceed the diodes max forward current rating it will overheat and fail. Most likely you were just exceeding the forward current rating of 20mA on the diodes, which caused them to blow.
                            You would need high speed diodes which can handle a lot more current, like some of the ones available from here (scroll through. There are four pages of diodes):
                            Diodes & Rectifiers - HV Stuff
                            wohoho yeah, 8.661.180.79inches, 23 volt drop holy crap these are serious
                            6A 20kV 100nS High Voltage Diode HV Rectifier High Frequency - HV Stuff

                            gonna get some of these! thanks
                            In the beginner's mind, there are many possibilities.
                            In the expert's mind there are few.
                            -Shunryu Suzuki

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by mr.clean View Post
                              wohoho yeah, 8.661.180.79inches, 23 volt drop holy crap these are serious
                              6A 20kV 100nS High Voltage Diode HV Rectifier High Frequency - HV Stuff
                              gonna get some of these! thanks
                              Yeah, those should be good diodes for Don Smith type high voltage devices since they are fast diodes and are suitable for high frequency use. They are on the expensive side however, but that seems to be about the going rate, I think...
                              level

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by mr.clean View Post
                                Hi Didier, an input filter is just to try to avoid high frequency waves from being active on the DC input rails.
                                DrStiffler had shown a series of ferrites with bridging capacitors
                                Thanks for these specifications, Kurt.

                                Is that the high frequency waves comes from the device and go backward up to the DC supply and you try to avoid that because you only want DC on the DC side otherwise it screw the command circuit?

                                Sorry, I am just a newby in electronic! ^_^
                                Trying to understand perfectly something, observing by one's self to check the truth, is the only way to skills and to protect oneself from false data and rumors.

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