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  • Zilano
    Yes you have shared "Heaps" of info,And it is most definately appreciated!!

    The problem is in The "Heap"!![for me the "novice"]

    Will any amount of begging ,Groveling ,or pleading...............

    Appeal to your compassion??

    Can you Focus a bit more??

    Please
    Chetkremens@gmail.com
    If you want to Change the world
    BE that change !!

    Comment


    • Hi Zilano;
      No. It is not matter of believing. I think nothing new for any ordinary Tesla coiler you could deliver in all information you included. Important for the free energy community is to share the Personal Experience and the Tested Circuits. Theory is available everywhere, at least in Donís Book. Believe me, with all respect to you, we do not need months, nor hours to understand the many theories you are stating here.
      Everyone would appreciate you directly speak of and focus on your product and personal experience.

      Comment


      • Regarding custom made NST

        Zilano

        Regarding your custom made NST ;I missed your pictures and some of your explanation regarding this...I found this thread too late;your postings was modified and some things deleted .Sorry if I asking you things about you mentioned already in the past...
        Some of details and schematics that was deleted from this topic I found them in an summary pdf made by vrand...but not complete details ...

        So;

        1.Please let me know the primary and secondary wires thickness what you have used for your nst... this will help me better to have a clue about how proportionate and wind my nst....I am a newbie in this kind of stuff

        2.Regarding the 4000 winds of your secondary this is the real number? Is not a mistake?
        I made some experiments with fly back cores from tv custom made with 300 winds in secondary at 12 v and 600 ma consumption when secondary terminals is "shorted " with 7 mm air gap between and discharging occurring ...




        My question is: if we have a spark discharge 7 mm average between nst secondary terminals this mean we have some 7000 volts ?(1mm spark =1000 Volts (?) ) .So why need to wind secondary with some 4000 winds (like you done ) if we have spark discharge already at just 300 winds ? This is not a waste of cooper wire and time?
        This was done without any resonant capacitors across wire yet ;just for experiment first..

        3.In your nst schematic given to us by vrand, I see an 220 OHM resistor in series with the 270 ohm resistor...I modified the design ( I mentioned about this in some my earlier post) in my experimental nst -see the picture what I posted -and removed the resistor( mine was 27 OHM ) that going to the minus and to the emitter and circuit worked just fine...

        Here is Zilano schematic with circuit attached


        CAn you let me know why in original circuit (yours for example, ) ,that 220 ohm resistor is used if the circuit seems to work ( my design worked) without him? In my circuit without that resistor the consumption decreased ...so why is used however ?

        Thank you for your time and patience ...and please excuse me for some stupid questions what ,maybe, I enunciate them ....
        Last edited by sinergicus; 09-05-2011, 02:13 PM.

        Comment


        • @Sinergicus: Circuit might work fine for you. 2n3055 have good casing and can tolerate lot of heat.
          The bias resistor pair is to set right operating point of transistor to prevent saturation.

          Comment


          • Excelent stuff in this thread, Zilano you are putting a lot of time and work in here, good job. Even those of us not paticipating much in this discussion are getting something out of this thread, good to see all the interest and good direction.

            I think the way the secondary coils still confuse me, Don says he just cut a long coil in two pieces, so that would mean it should be like one big coil but tapped in the center. Whats you're opinion on that Zilano ? Does it matter ?

            I dunno.

            Since there is only one primary wouldn't it be kind of cancelling if it was wound any other way ? But since it is in resonance wouldn't both ends alternate thier peak voltage with the center tap between. When the two ends are added and put through one AC side of the FWBR it would give double the duty/voltage-time and the center tap to the other AC side of the FWBR gives all the current. Maybe.

            Anyway keep up the good work all.

            Cheers

            EDIT: When I say "Like one big coil" I was just refering to the direction of winding is all, each side of the secondary would make up one coil each for resonant purposes. As you say earlier.

            It's just the direction I'm getting at.
            Last edited by Farmhand; 09-05-2011, 04:44 PM.

            Comment


            • Here is a good article on the relationship of antenna coils written in 1924

              how antennaz work

              You need to sign in as a member to read the issues - it's free.

              Comment


              • Error eeks

                Page not found..

                Nice site Tesla Universe...... cool

                great pictures

                Become a member to view...



                Originally posted by dragon View Post
                Here is a good article on the relationship of antenna coils written in 1924

                how antennaz work

                You need to sign in as a member to read the issues - it's free.
                Last edited by h2ocommuter; 09-05-2011, 05:08 PM.

                Comment


                • More on NSTs

                  Thanks for the reply zzz. I will look into solid state NSTs.

                  The transformers on this page (High Voltage Current Limited Transformers) all seem to be for 60Hz, so I'm guessing that they are iron core although they are rated for the right voltage and amperage.

                  I now have the PVM 400 from the page (http://www.amazing1.com/hv-hf-power-supplies.htm). The specs say that open-circuit voltage is 20kv and that the output is variable from 1 to 15kv.

                  However, there is only one potentiometer on this for controlling frequency. Further, the website says it goes from 15Hz-35kHz and the product documentation says 20Hz-50kHz.

                  So I'm not quite sure what to do with this.

                  The flyback circuit will take the frequency of its load (my spark and resonant coil), right?

                  But since this has a driver, I need to tune my load (spark and resonant coil) to it and fiddle with the potentiometer.

                  And I have no idea how to control voltage with this device.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by sinergicus View Post
                    Zilano

                    Regarding your custom made NST ;I missed your pictures and some of your explanation regarding this...I found this thread too late;your postings was modified and some things deleted .Sorry if I asking you things about you mentioned already in the past...
                    Some of details and schematics that was deleted from this topic I found them in an summary pdf made by vrand...but not complete details ...

                    .
                    Hi All,

                    Attached is an update to Zilano's Summary Design that includes most of Zilano's diagrams that I could find. Please let me know if you found an additional diagram and I will include it .

                    Cheers Mike
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by sinergicus View Post

                      ...

                      3.In your nst schematic given to us by vrand, I see an 220 OHM resistor in series with the 270 ohm resistor...I modified the design ( I mentioned about this in some my earlier post) in my experimental nst -see the picture what I posted -and removed the resistor( mine was 27 OHM ) that going to the minus and to the emitter and circuit worked just fine...

                      Here is Zilano schematic with circuit attached


                      CAn you let me know why in original circuit (yours for example, ) ,that 220 ohm resistor is used if the circuit seems to work ( my design worked) without him? In my circuit without that resistor the consumption decreased ...so why is used however ?
                      ...
                      Hello sinergicus,

                      The resistive divider you refer to (240 Ohm+27 Ohm and 270 Ohm+220 Ohm) helps stabilize the DC bias for the base-emitter of the oscillator transistor. This is a common solution, used for almost any biasing tasks whenever a bipolar transistor needs a stabil and dependable DC operation point. When you omit the lower member of this resistive divider, two things happen at least:
                      the driving DC current into the base will be less stabil and less well-defined from the oscillating transistor working point of view,
                      the base-emitter driving impedance will increase and this makes the oscillator much more sensitive to false operation when you position your circuit -unawarely- near to a higher voltage coil and the unwanted induction from it can enter more readily into the base-emitter path because the shunting 27 or 220 Ohms are missing i.e low impedance path between the base-emitter is missing.

                      You found that by omitting the 27 Ohm, the current consumption got reduced: this happens and in most cases normal because the DC current flowing via the two series resistors directly from the battery voltage was now missing, only the base current remained. (240+27=267 Ohm, current via the two resistors from 12V was 12/267=0.045A, this disappeared from the overall consumption and the working DC + AC points of the oscillator transistor got shifted a little to somewhere else.

                      Hope this helps it understand, resistive dividers are used extensively for bipolar transistor biasing and in EE circles omitting the lower member of the resistive voltage divider is considered bad engineering...

                      Gyula

                      Comment


                      • Coil Termoil !!

                        Originally posted by zilano
                        Hi Farmhand!

                        .....Snip....

                        well if u cut a single coil the two halfs can be used as cw and ccw. just rotate 1 part of coil by 180 degrees lengthwise
                        Hi Zilano, Flipping the cut portion of a coil still yields a coil of the same direction (cw or ccw).

                        Example, a forward slash, `////////////, flipped over, still is a forward slash.

                        Flip your monitor or stand on your head to see what I mean!


                        Duane
                        Dude, you're curving my space-time.

                        Comment


                        • deggers is right, just wrap a small coil and flip it over, it's still has the same winding direction, you need to rewind it to flip the direction or pull the coil through itself, but you're better of rewinding it .

                          Comment


                          • Thank you

                            Originally posted by gyula View Post
                            Hello sinergicus,

                            The resistive divider you refer to (240 Ohm+27 Ohm and 270 Ohm+220 Ohm) helps stabilize the DC bias for the base-emitter of the oscillator transistor. This is a common solution, used for almost any biasing tasks whenever a bipolar transistor needs a stabil and dependable DC operation point. When you omit the lower member of this resistive divider, two things happen at least:
                            the driving DC current into the base will be less stabil and less well-defined from the oscillating transistor working point of view,
                            the base-emitter driving impedance will increase and this makes the oscillator much more sensitive to false operation when you position your circuit -unawarely- near to a higher voltage coil and the unwanted induction from it can enter more readily into the base-emitter path because the shunting 27 or 220 Ohms are missing i.e low impedance path between the base-emitter is missing.

                            You found that by omitting the 27 Ohm, the current consumption got reduced: this happens and in most cases normal because the DC current flowing via the two series resistors directly from the battery voltage was now missing, only the base current remained. (240+27=267 Ohm, current via the two resistors from 12V was 12/267=0.045A, this disappeared from the overall consumption and the working DC + AC points of the oscillator transistor got shifted a little to somewhere else.

                            Hope this helps it understand, resistive dividers are used extensively for bipolar transistor biasing and in EE circles omitting the lower member of the resistive voltage divider is considered bad engineering...

                            Gyula

                            Now is more clear for me;please tell me how you will chose ,calculate the shunting resistors in this type of circuits(in our case 27 ohm that I omited in my circuit and respectively 220 ohm in Zilano circuit ) .I suppose the the shunting resistor value depending on base resistor that we have ( and maybe other factors (?) ) .

                            If we will chose,for example higher value for base resistor ( so we will have higher frequency ) i suppose the shunting resistor must change his value also (?) .
                            Anyway between 27 and 220 ohms is a big difference....I suppose ,with 27 ohm the circuit will work allot different like with 220 ohm shunt resistor...

                            Thank you for your explanations....

                            Comment


                            • Still Confused

                              Sorry to be an idiot here. I have gone through all the posts again and am confused about conflicting schematics.

                              First, I am using an old NST that is only 60 Hz output. Does this mean I put the primary capacitor in parallel and the spark gap in series? Or are both in parallel? I find schematics showing both, which may be related to which NST is being used (60 Hz or 35 khz).

                              Thank you for all your kind help. I've been working on this for over a year and just now feel I'm moving forward.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by nowatts View Post
                                Sorry to be an idiot here. I have gone through all the posts again and am confused about conflicting schematics.

                                First, I am using an old NST that is only 60 Hz output. Does this mean I put the primary capacitor in parallel and the spark gap in series? Or are both in parallel? I find schematics showing both, which may be related to which NST is being used (60 Hz or 35 khz).

                                Thank you for all your kind help. I've been working on this for over a year and just now feel I'm moving forward.
                                I think it has been said that 60Hz is too low. You're dealing with Mhz frequencies which dampen due to LC tank's ohmic resistance. I assume when the 60hz nst causes the next spark the LC circuit has long dampened so it might show what zilano is claiming but for a small time period only, you could say that it has a very small pulse width even though we're not dealing with square waves. So the higher the exciting frequency of the spark gap the better.

                                And I think this is the circuit you're looking for:

                                http://www.energeticforum.com/155189-post739.html

                                Comment

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