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Rotary Electrostatic Converter by Chris Carson

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Turion View Post
    I have all the documents he sent me in a file. I built a small version of this years ago, and it worked as he indicated. You can purchase aluminum tape that is sticky on one side at Lowes. It is used for repairing air conditioning ducts. It allowed me to cut out the shapes I wanted and then peel the sticky back off and apply it to a plastic rotor. I still have all the rotors I made boxed up on my shelf. I should state that I did NOT build all the electronics. I simply tested to see if it would generate as he showed how to do in his instructions.
    I mean just the naked wheel without tronixs

    What was it expected to do? Did it do what you thought? Static electricity? Like the
    vandegraff building up a HV charge. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_de_Graaff_generator

    Comment


    • #17
      Yes, it did what I expected. It generated usable power. But it also pointed out to me the MANY mistakes in my build. Static electricity like this will “reach around corners” and make connections that short things out, so you have to be very precise in your build. It showed me what to look for if I ever decided to build a larger version. Which I will not do. For years I built stuff like this hoping it could be “scaled up” to give me what I wanted, then moved on to something else when I realized HOW BIG it would have to be to do that. Doesn’t mean it won’t work. Just didn’t appear to me to be practical when you subtract out the cost of running the rotor.

      I have all the plates that I made for this and I would be happy to send them to anyone who is interested and wants to pay for shipping. You need linear feet of counter space to set it up and a motor with a shaft coming out both ends would be best, so you could put it in the middle between the two sections. I used a razor scooter motor that I removed the shaft from and replaced with a bolt that I then cut the head off. Laser Sabre has a motor on his site that can be 3D printed (or at least he used to) that will run on static electricity in the air, which this SHOULD produce. So maybe you start it with a conventional motor and then run it on his when up to speed. No Lenz, so would not need much torque. I can take pictures of the plates if anyone is interested. If you wanted it bigger, just add more plates.
      Dave
      “Advances are made by answering questions. Discoveries are made by questioning answers.”
      —Bernhard Haisch, Astrophysicist

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Turion View Post
        Yes, it did what I expected. It generated usable power. But it also pointed out to me the MANY mistakes in my build. Static electricity like this will “reach around corners” and make connections that short things out, so you have to be very precise in your build. It showed me what to look for if I ever decided to build a larger version. Which I will not do. For years I built stuff like this hoping it could be “scaled up” to give me what I wanted, then moved on to something else when I realized HOW BIG it would have to be to do that. Doesn’t mean it won’t work. Just didn’t appear to me to be practical when you subtract out the cost of running the rotor.

        I have all the plates that I made for this and I would be happy to send them to anyone who is interested and wants to pay for shipping. You need linear feet of counter space to set it up and a motor with a shaft coming out both ends would be best, so you could put it in the middle between the two sections. I used a razor scooter motor that I removed the shaft from and replaced with a bolt that I then cut the head off. Laser Sabre has a motor on his site that can be 3D printed (or at least he used to) that will run on static electricity in the air, which this SHOULD produce. So maybe you start it with a conventional motor and then run it on his when up to speed. No Lenz, so would not need much torque. I can take pictures of the plates if anyone is interested. If you wanted it bigger, just add more plates.
        Dave
        I guess these static generators have been around quite awhile but the electronics to properly
        reduce voltages down keeps changing to a higher efficiency. The plates are so thin seems like a
        series of 10 or 20 rotors would constitute a motor, especially being lenz free.

        https://www.sciplus.com/static-elect...SABEgI9y_D_BwE

        Comment


        • #19
          has anyone put a magnetic pickup coil near the moving electrostatic fields to see how much power can be taken out of the system that way, maybe without slowing down the moving parts ?

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Aaron View Post
            Rotary Electrostatic Converter

            cont...

            They strong armed their way into my Desert laboratory to steal all related equipment. The property owner of the desert lab died shortly thereafter, within weeks of Chris Carson’s death. Friends of yours Peter?

            but rather by the Woman in White. Today the Integratron is a Goddess worship temple…

            why should Eric Dollard involve himself in the useless or criminal behavior of others.

            I have no interest in teaching anyone about Tesla except under the department of the Navy or the likes thereof. The door is shut!

            73 DE N6KPH SK
            Who is Peter? This is a great revelation, thx Aaron, keep duckin, you know what I mean. I give you the free energy dog and pony show. Go Eric.


            by Scott Hensler
            Last edited by BroMikey; 01-19-2020, 12:03 PM.

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            • #21
              Chris Carson's device is a Parametric Amplifier. Please see the attached file, parametric.txt for information on how it works.

              I wrote 4 LTspice simulations of time-varying reactance oscillators, you can play with and see how it works.




              parametric.txt



              dL-dt.gif

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              • #22
                The only times I ever succeeded in simulating overunity cleanly, without sporadic spikes (in LTspice and MicroCap), but with clean arching wedges, in Eric Dollard's analog computer in LMD mode, is when its central capacitors possessed negative parallel resistance in addition to possessing positive series resistance. But I kept wondering what this means and how is it built?

                The answer lies right here in this thread! Parametric capacitance!!! What gave me a partial clue is when someone on Quora explained to me in describing this phenomenon as being that of an amplifier...

                https://is.gd/iquhin

                And it’s attracting attention in the scientific community...

                https://is.gd/pararef

                Thanks goes to Jeane Manning for her inspiration...

                https://is.gd/notsafetotravel
                Last edited by Vinyasi; 07-04-2020, 07:43 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by seanlogan View Post
                  Chris Carson's device is a Parametric Amplifier. Please see the attached file, parametric.txt for information on how it works.

                  I wrote 4 LTspice simulations of time-varying reactance oscillators, you can play with and see how it works.

                  parametric.txt

                  dL-dt.gif
                  The following steps were taken to recover these ASC files due to
                  an error message...

                  image_23190.jpg

                  ...generated upon opening them in LTspice involving
                  the first line of characters.

                  Open the ASC file in a binary text editor, such as: EditPad Pro 7
                  Convert / To Windows (CR LF)
                  Save
                  Close
                  Re-Open it in Windows Notepad
                  Copy all lines after the first line
                  Select some other program which had been previously drawn in LTspice, and...
                  Open it in Windows Notepad
                  Delete all lines after the first line by pasting and overwriting them
                  Save As (and overwrite) onto the ASC file
                  Repeat for each file...;-)

                  Then, I saved them into a compressed ZIP file along with the PDF files (you provide links to for referencing), plus screenshots of the schematics (in case these modified ASC files should still fail to open in LTspice), plus a Wikipedia article on Gabriel's Horn and my Quora post on Impedance of Same Magnitude which these waveforms remind me of... {Slide the "B" slider to the right, at this web-app, to become any value greater than zero.}

                  image_23192.jpg

                  This condition is similar to "pure resonance" (but is not exactly the same since there is no direct and constant "source of input", here). Pure resonance is an "undamped harmonic oscillator forced at its natural frequency" which responds by "oscillating with an amplitude that grows to infinity over time." -- Unit II: Second Order Constant Coefficient Linear Equations -- Pure Resonance
                  I look forward to playing around with these... Thanks!
                  Last edited by Vinyasi; 07-05-2020, 02:23 AM.

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                  • #24
                    Correction:

                    mean = (max + min) /2

                    Not

                    mean = (max - min) /2

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Vinyasi View Post

                      I look forward to playing around with these... Thanks!
                      Well, I took one look at all of your math and I realized that... I am not familiar with that approach (the same approach that anyone takes who is formally trained on this subject).

                      And I don't want to build a mechanical device. I want something which modifies parameters via a solid state device.

                      So, tinkering around with Eric's analog computer in LMD mode, I discovered the generalized principle (described by Jim Murray in his Transforming Generator) that sometimes one component of a circuit can modify the field-effect generated by another component (placed nearby the first component) if their solid-state parameters (defining their "ground state" or initial condition) are equal. This modification of a component's field manages to do what the RNA in a cell can do: flagrantly ignore whatever the DNA specifies and make up its own interpretation based on factors directly affecting the RNA and having nothing to do with the DNA, such as: local environment (hormones, etc) of the body, mental state of the person, etc.

                      I'm too simple-minded and unfamiliar with the engineering work-ethic.

                      So, I did my usual discovery-by-way-of "exhaustion of all parameters" until I managed to find a way to scale down the size of Eric's analog computer and put an operable negative resistance into the capacitors inside the LMD modules without the use of moving parts.

                      It's not perfect. It lacks uniform periodicity which a PWM interface might demand of this type of power supply.
                      Last edited by Vinyasi; 07-06-2020, 03:08 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        One solid state device which can vary capacitance with respect to time is a Varactor Diode. Also called a Varicap. This is what is used in real Parametric Amplifiers.

                        Another way to do it is to vary inductance with respect to time. This can be done by moving the core in and out of a coil, or by saturating and un-saturating the core, as is done in a magnetic amplifier.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by seanlogan View Post
                          One solid state device which can vary capacitance with respect to time is a Varactor Diode. Also called a Varicap. This is what is used in real Parametric Amplifiers.

                          Another way to do it is to vary inductance with respect to time. This can be done by moving the core in and out of a coil, or by saturating and un-saturating the core, as is done in a magnetic amplifier.
                          I don't know how to use varicaps in a simulation. I've tried to use someone's suggestions and I failed to get similar results as those described by the author of that blog. So, I gave up. What type of tuning is required or what detail/s should I put my attention on when incorporating them in a circuit?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            LTspice has two example circuits that use varicaps. You can look at those. LTspice is free.

                            A typical varicap (Varactor Diode) may vary from 25 - 500 pF when it is reverse biased from 1 - 16V. The higher the reverse bias voltage, the lower the capacitance.

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