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Magnetic Field around Single Wire Conductor

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  • Magnetic Field around Single Wire Conductor

    In 1991 (1), Avramenko found that he could transmit significant amounts of power over a single wire with a very small diameter, without the wire heating up. Even adding a several megaohm resistor did not really diminish the output power, and a thermo milliamp meter was unable to detect the current. Other experimenters have had similar results.

    Since I'm travelling, it is hard to perform any experiments, so I've been trying to read a lot to try to figure out what could explain this curious behavior. On Eric Dollard's recommendation, I started reading "Electricity and Matter" by JJ Thomson, and found the following:

    "We see that it is only the motion of a [line of force] at right angles to itself [= transverse] which produces magnetic force; no such force is produced by the gliding of a [line of force] along its length [= longitudinal]."
    And since everyone seems to be saying that Tesla coils produce longitudinal waves, even though I have yet to see anyone prove that definitively, this might be that prove! For if the wave is longitudinal, it will not produce a magnetic force, since its lines of magnetic force are in the direction of propagation (tell me if I'm interpreting this wrong).

    Therefore, I would LOVE to know if anyone has performed any of Faraday's basic tests of a magnetic field around a current carrying wire on a single wire transmission line coming off of a Tesla coil:

    1. Using a compass to determine the presence and direction of a magnetic field
    2. Using iron filings to determine the shape of the magnetic field

    If you have performed such experiments, please share your results here! Alternative explanations are also welcome (I'm also toying with the idea that single wire currents could be Maxwell's displacement currents for example).


    (1) Avramenko, S. V., Zaev, N. E., & Lisin, V. N. (1991). The measuring of conduction current that is stimulated by polarization current. Journal of Russian Physical Society, (2), D1-2.
    Last edited by Kregus; 06-20-2019, 09:30 PM.

  • #2
    How is that related to this video ?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bDyA5t1ldU

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    • #3
      Glenn Elmore did some excellent work on longitudinal electro-*magnetic* surface waves:

      Directory contents of /pdf/Patents/Elmore/

      http://www.tuks.nl/pdf/Patents/Elmor...0Conductor.pdf

      An overlooked solution to the Maxwell*Heaviside equations supports the existence of a propagating TM surface wave on coaxial cable as well as on a completely unshielded single conductor. This non*radiating surface wave mode exhibits attenuation much lower than coax and a relative propagation velocity of unity. It is very broadband and haspractical applications from RF through microwave frequencies and beyond

      This is still an electro*magnetic* wave, though, propagating at the speed of light.

      The experiments by Dollard, measuring the propagation speed of a longitudinal wave along the shield of a coaxial cable, showed that a mode also exists which propagates faster than light. See page 61:

      http://www.tuks.nl/pdf/Reference_Mat...20VOL%20II.pdf


      Working with a compass or iron fillings to detect the magnetic field in these cases does not work, though, because these are high frequency currents, not DC.

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