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  • Spiral machine

    This is a machine I built to test a theory I had. Itís based on a spiral being a long curved ramp, and some steel balls building up angular speed, and also momentum in the wheel, as they descend.
    I reasoned that the energy built up by multiple balls combined with the wheel would be enough to lift one ball back to the start near the center.
    It didnít work as I have it built.
    I found that the tracks have to be very smooth and even, otherwise it creates parasitic oscillations in the balls as they roll towards the bottom. This robs a lot of energy from the system.
    I think the tracks need to be a little steeper too. This would build up more inertia and centrifugal force, which would add needed energy.
    I was thinking the same concept could be done with a coil of tubing and some water. Replace the balls with segments of water and then connect the end of the tube back to the beginning. It would be easy to roll into a spiral anyway.
    The point here is that even though it didnít work, it wasnít a failure. It is just the first step in finding out how a setup like this can be improved. Itís this way with every new concept, and it rarely works the first time.
    Iím going to try and find a better track material, and change the angle of the spiral, for the next iteration. Weíll see if that improves things.



    Cheers,

    Ted

  • #2
    Leverage only.....

    Ted,

    Having worked on dozens of Gravity Engine designs over the years, I am fairly sure this one can't work, no matter how perfectly you build it. The machine design produces a balanced leverage equation approximating the following statement:

    Can four weights on a short lever lift one weight on a lever four times as long? The answer is NO, it just creates balance! There is no energy to be gained by this process.

    So, with bearing friction and rolling friction of the weights, you will always be 1% below breaking even.

    Sorry.

    The ball weights on the spiral do NOT build up angular momentum because they are NOT spinning, they are just DROPPING along the ramp. Your Milkodini machine is on the right track, because it also harnesses the centrifugal force of the spinning weight. Work that one out as it is much more promising than other designs that ONLY use gravity.

    Peter
    Peter Lindemann, D.Sc.

    Open System Thermodynamics Perpetual Motion Reality Electric Motor Secrets
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Peter Lindemann View Post
      Ted,

      Having worked on dozens of Gravity Engine designs over the years, I am fairly sure this one can't work, no matter how perfectly you build it. The machine design produces a balanced leverage equation approximating the following statement:

      Can four weights on a short lever lift one weight on a lever four times as long? The answer is NO, it just creates balance! There is no energy to be gained by this process.

      So, with bearing friction and rolling friction of the weights, you will always be 1% below breaking even.

      Sorry.

      The ball weights on the spiral do NOT build up angular momentum because they are NOT spinning, they are just DROPPING along the ramp. Your Milkodini machine is on the right track, because it also harnesses the centrifugal force of the spinning weight. Work that one out as it is much more promising than other designs that ONLY use gravity.

      Peter
      Thanks for the input Peter.
      I'm still working on the other machine, but I'm waiting on some parts so I put this thing together.
      I beg to differ on the point of angular momentum. I purposely built these tracks so the balls would ride closer to their axis of rotation. This builds up a much higher rate of spin than if they were rolling on a flat surface.
      I realize that gravity alone won't make these wheels work. My original thought was to use a disk shaped weight with an axle that rode on the rails and developed enough angular momentum that when it got to the bottom, that momentum could be put to use getting it back up (but I only had these ball bearings). If the rim of the weight were to be used as the motive surface once it reach the bottom, it could quickly pick up a lot of speed for the trip back up the ramp.
      If I get the parts in this week I should have Milko II running by the weekend.

      Cheers,

      Ted
      Last edited by Ted Ewert; 11-05-2007, 06:24 PM.

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      • #4
        My Gravity Chain

        Hi Ted, Peter, and everybody!

        First of all......Peter, you have worked on DOZENS of gravity
        chains? AMAZING! Is there an alternative energy you are
        not an authority on?????? (compliment)

        Secondly, here is my idea for a gravity chain, but to understand
        it fully, I suggest you watch this Youtube video showing the ability
        of small magnets ability to make large magnets totally defy gravity.
        YouTube - Magnetic Launcher

        It is also largely based on the "Murilo Luciano" gravity chain here:
        http://www.panaceauniversity.org/D21.pdf (page 7)

        Anyway, here is my idea/photo. I wish I knew how to make those
        cool 3-D videos that some of you guys do. The mechanics of this
        are still being tweaked, but try to imagine all the balls below circulating
        inside of a clear plastic tube. On the outside of the tube are the smaller
        magnets propelling the larger magnets similar to the Youtube video.

        Basically, magnets lift the weights on the right hand side of the chain,
        and several forces drive the weights down on the left of the chain. The
        sprocketed wheel at the bottom can be used to drive a generator.

        I am pretty sure that it will work, but I just have NO CLUE what kind of
        force it might produce. It could obviously be scaled up, or scaled down,
        but as it is drawn, the small 1/2" square magnets are only about .50 cents
        each, but those large 1.5" magnets are very pricey at around $35 each!
        (somebody please tell me if you can find them cheaper)

        This is not to scale at all, nor are the number of magnets, but hopefully
        you all will get the idea.

        Thoughts please.

        Thanks, Bob

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        • #5
          Use it with a Skinner design, throw the weight out every 90.
          artv

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