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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Part 2 Where Thane shows the operation.

    See Part 1 in the previous post. This weeks new release.

    He is at about 50v sometimes 70v so this makes for a shorter
    coil length allowing a larger dia wire to increase the amps.


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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Thanks Dave great update. I'll bet the Kitchen is nice.

    New explanation of speed up under load for the folks with brain lock.


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  • Turion
    replied
    2007-01-25 01.20.41.jpg 2007-01-25 01.00.40.jpg 2007-01-24 22.17.36.jpg 2007-01-25 00.59.58.jpg 2007-01-24 22.16.21.jpg 2007-01-25 01.00.28.jpgMy buddy will be shipping me all the parts to put this thing together sometime in the next week or so. And he will have one also. The differences between it and my current machines will be that the rotor contains almost twice as many magnets, which are 3/4 thick instead of 1/2 inch thick. More mass means more flux, at least up to the point where the core becomes saturated. The coil cores will be ferrite rather than iron. It also only holds 10 coils instead of 12, but only TWO coils at a time align to the rotor magnets, so it requires much less input to turn the rotor. If you have followed along, it STILL requires amps to turn the rotor, but maybe if this build is more accurate, those requirements will diminish. One of the cool things about THIS build is that the adjustment of the opposition magnets, which was a painful process on the big machine at Greyland's shop, has much finer control, far less PLAY, and is therefore far more accurate. I'm VERY excited about THAT. Also, the bearings are built right into the coil holders, so far less distance between them. My intention with this machine is to change the wiring scheme to see if I can get the amperage up and the voltage down while still maintaining speed up under load. I would like an output of 30-50 volts AC, with more amps. I can control that with either a step down transformer and then convert to DC or convert directly to DC and then buck down to a lower DC voltage. The range of DC to DC buck modules has a high end limit as far as I can tell. I haven't found one that will deal with over 120 volts DC. Anyway, that's the update.

    I'm about done with the remodel on my house. I have trim work to do when contractor finishes putting down tile and carpet, and cabinets to remodel in the kitchen, but all the hard stuff is done. I'll be happy to get back to work on THIS stuff full time.

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    BiTT

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Infinity Generator Update.



    thanerotors4.jpg

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    I did this and after 2 years I had to put a 12v battery across the output wire for a few seconds. Then I got once again residual. I use an induction motor connected to a 2 1/2 hp gasoline engine. Any induction motor works. 50uf -100uf per hp

    Last edited by BroMikey; 11-02-2020, 04:33 AM.

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  • BroMikey
    replied

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Motor

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  • BroMikey
    replied

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    While we wait on a few milling projects watch machines fly

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    200 years old tech rewind

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  • alexelectric
    replied
    Go that you entertain yourself working and enjoying what you like to do, so it is time for everything, that you continue your work with success
    Regards BroMikey

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Here we are witnessing a standard milling, which is about 2000 pounds with a rotary table cutting in circles. At this time the rotary table is connected to the feed on the mill. Turning the rotary table by hand is another video.

    If you are cutting circles with a tablesaw or drill press lathe, remember that the "run out" is anywhere from 50 thousandths or more or less. "RUN OUT" is all about the wobble in the cutting device. With a regular mill "run out" is less than 1/2 a thousandths and could be 1/10th.

    Last edited by BroMikey; 10-21-2020, 08:48 PM.

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    nice milling machine. Now that's what it takes. the 1" shaft upgrade is AAA+++ however I would not use aluminum for a rotor. Unless you have one that works the same as plastic?
    My son and I were welding out the bottom of the trailer frame today as part of his home school class work. Things are moving along. I have missed 2 milling machines in past few days. It is a steady stream but you must be ready to move with money in hand to get a deal.

    Picked up a homemade log splitter today so I will have more free time to work projects. He crafted it out of a 63 chevy pickup, rebuilt motor, half the frame attached to all the hydraulics, very cool one of a kind for a few hundred. Most people wouldn't want it. I love industrial grade. 20 ton. cracked some impossible twisted stumps like butter today.

    Machining a circle (one way)

    Last edited by BroMikey; 10-21-2020, 11:10 AM.

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  • alexelectric
    replied
    It's good that you keep moving forward, and show images, thank you for your information that serves as a guide.
    Now they are using new materials and the motor shaft was changed for a 1 "one, well it supports more effort
    The rotor that you show are 22 repulsors, is that right?

    It is good that they already have improvements, and that you also have other projects.Sir, Dave, personally I look forward to your new projects if you want to share them and try them yourself, and then if you think it is worth sharing them, with those who take the hassle of doing them.

    Thank you, we remain attentive to your information
    Last edited by alexelectric; 10-20-2020, 12:42 AM.

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