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  • Turion
    replied
    First, those diodes will work fine.
    Second, there is only ONE schematic with two boost modules. The first boost module is running directly off the battery. The second boost module is running between the high voltage (26V) output of the first boost boost module and the positive (12V) of the battery. Potential difference. The load is running between the (26V) output of the 2nd boost module and the (12V) battery. Potential difference. This is about as BASIC as you can get. Running loads this way is second nature to me now, and I don't even have to think about it, but I remember how confusing it was to me in the beginning.
    Third, I didn't show a cap, but the cap goes across the battery. Positive to battery positive and negative to battery negative. It is the lake you dump your energy into before it goes over the dam. (It and the battery)

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    How does the first boost power up, thru the second boost ? wow crazzzzy kool

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    I have some of these or do I need something else? I still don't see where the cap goes.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/36372884812...ntid=548731002

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Originally posted by Turion View Post
    .

    If you have 3 batteries, put two in series and connect the boost module positive in to the positive output of the two batteries in series. Connect the negative in of the boost module to the positive of the third battery. Connect the negative of the third battery to the negative of the two batteries in series. Take the output of the boost module set to 26 volts and run it through a load to the positive of the third battery. You will have to rotate your batteries to keep up the potential difference and keep the batteries charged.

    Again, do not forget the diode!.

    I have included a schematic for both circuits.
    It's called research.

    interesting to try. thx man

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  • Turion
    replied
    Posted in Error
    Last edited by Turion; 08-15-2022, 09:22 PM.

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  • Turion
    replied
    I would suggest you take all those schematics and throw them in the trash. They all have changes or additions that I did not put on ANY drawing I created. Or if I did, they are incorrect. I know I NEVER used the term "UPS" or "MPPT" nor do I have that little picture of a "light bulb" that appears on so many of these drawings. These drawings were someone else's version of something I posted. They are way too complicated for a beginner. A beginner needs a basic setup and needs to learn the principles involved. Some of these schematics show what NOT to do, which is why I know they were altered because they do things I would NEVER do. Like running a load directly on a "UPS" instead of running that energy THROUGH the load and collecting it on the other side. That's a BASIC mistake.

    There are basic principles I have been trying to show.
    bistander claimed on his thread that I SAID a boost module is a free energy device. I actually said "I figured out YEARS ago that the boost module was a free energy device." What I SHOULD have said is, a boost module USED CORRECTLY is a free energy device. There's a HUGE difference. If you don't get that, you do not understand the most basic concept of using potentials. And not EVERY boost module will work on the system the way it needs to. And not EVERY boost module is efficient enough to give you good results.

    If you run a boost module connected directly to a battery you might put in 100 watts and expect to get around 85 watts out the secondary on an "average" boost module. There is nothing "free energy" about that now is there? FAR less out than in. But if you run the boost module on the 3 battery system, or between potential differences, you input 100 watts and still get 85 watts out. But THIS time you recover some of what went THROUGH the primary of the boost module to the charge battery. If you recover LESS than 15 watts, you have nothing special. But if you recover MORE than 15 watts, you have a gain, and that GAIN is free energy. You are GENERATING energy here. You put some in and you get MORE OUT than what you put in when you combine the "generated" energy (85% of input energy) with the "recovered" energy (more than 15% of input energy). If NO energy was being recovered, battery 3 WOULD NOT CHARGE.

    So how do you make sure that you get that gain? Well, the first thing is testing the crap out of a bunch of different boost modules to see which is the most efficient. There is one out there, very expensive I might add, that "CLAIMS" 95% efficiency, but when run under higher input voltages actually shows a return of 99.7%. So how much of the "input" do I have to recover to achieve that gain? If you couldn't do the math, the answer is .3%.

    So now we look at means of recovery. A capacitor is best because it basically takes everything you want to give it up to its limit. Unfortunately you have to have a BIG cap. A cap in parallel with a battery will also work, and is better at collecting the energy that the battery cannot immediately accept . But you are still limited by the impedance of the battery. This is where the lithium batteries come in or the lithium/graphine hybrid. Their ability to accept what they are given without FIGHTING BACK can be the difference between success and failure. Battery impedance is a KILLER. More batteries in parallel to receive the "charge" energy the better.

    I look at some of those circuits above and I see loads running on outputs. NEVER. NEVER. NEVER run a load unless it is between potentials. NEVER!!!! Now it can't be avoided if you only have one battery, but if you have THREE, eliminate that boost module running off a single battery to give you a higher potential source. You eliminate one BIG strike against success right there.

    Think of a river flowing from the mountain top to the ocean. You can put hydroelectric dams along the river, but each dam produces less power than the one upstream (at least in this analogy). The Colorado in Arizona is an example. There must be four or five dams on the Colorado, and by the time it gets to Mexico, it is a stream not a river. Your system is going to flow downhill from the source, and you can tap it along the way to produce energy Each time you tap it you get out less until you get out very little. The HIGHER the source ( the farther up the mountain you go) the more times you can tap the source to produce and recover energy. Start with a 12 volt battery and you have to BOOST it to at least 24 volts to get your downhill flow. Start with 48 volts, and you have the difference between 48 and 36. The difference between 36 and 24. The difference between 24 and 12. From my count, that is 3 times you get to tap the flow of energy. YES, there will be losses. But if you use the RIGHT boost modules (three in this example) and the right batteries (ten in this example) and you run the outputs from the boost modules THROUGH loads back to the individual batteries at the top of the mountain, interesting things happen.

    I would NEVER recommend starting with something this complex. Most people don't even understand how this really works and are incapable of putting together a functioning circuit. And then they will blame me because it did not work. Once you DO understand the principles and can build a simple circuit on your own, you certainly don't need ME to show you the benefits of a potential difference circuit. You will SEE the reasons on your bench. Or lighting up your shop.

    HERE ARE THE TWO SIMPLEST CIRCUITS YOU CAN RUN
    If you have only one battery, the simplest circuit is to run a boost module directly on it, positive to positive and negative to negative. Take the positive output of the boost module set to about 26 volts and run it to the positive IN of a SECOND boost module. Take the negative IN of that boost module and connect it back to the positive of your source battery. Now take the positive output of that second boost module(set to 26 volts also) and run it through a load back to the positive of that source battery. DON'T forget the diode!!! It gives you a voltage loss, but you may need it to protect your boost module. Then again, you may not. Want to fry a $30.00 boost module to find out? It may be worth it in the long run, but certainly NOT the short term. I wanted to add that with a single battery system, the capacitor across the battery is INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT, and it should be as huge as you can find. Because it will collect ANY energy it receives and outputs whatever it has in it, it is the lake being fed by a river at the top of the dam, and can provide as much over the top of the battery as is required while your battery slowly fills it up. If your system is outputting MORE than what is being consumed by the circuit and the load, you can ELIMINATE any "battery" issues of impedance with that capacitor. Set BOTH boost modules to around 26 volts.

    If you have 3 batteries, put two in series and connect the boost module positive in to the positive output of the two batteries in series. Connect the negative in of the boost module to the positive of the third battery. Connect the negative of the third battery to the negative of the two batteries in series. Take the output of the boost module set to 26 volts and run it through a load to the positive of the third battery. You will have to rotate your batteries to keep up the potential difference and keep the batteries charged. Again, do not forget the diode!. Set boost module for 26 volts.

    I have included a schematic for both circuits.

    I am currently running something similar to the single battery circuit shown here. Just not using these same components, and because my output voltages are higher, I have to buck the voltage down before the load. But the principles are the same. And I am running 30 watts of load, and have run it with 70 watts of load for short periods to see what would happen to my battery voltage. It's called research.



    Two Basic CIrcuits.jpg

    Attached Files
    Last edited by Turion; 08-17-2022, 04:08 AM.

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Originally posted by wantomake View Post

    I kind of get what you're doing a the setup off of the boost of buck modules.

    Thanks for the share of your test.

    BroMikey you sure are lighting things up.
    Interesting setups you and Turion are using. I need to get going!!! Lol!!!
    Somebody has to make noise, Dave can hear a pin drop at his shop worried his generator will make some humming sounds. It's gone don't worry and all that is left is static electricity crackling at 350vdc hoping for a breakthru.

    I'll have to do another test to keep Dave awake.

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  • wantomake
    replied
    All I wanto have;
    Is enough free or kind of free energy to run my shop fan, lights, and any power tool for duration of me using it.
    If the power is out in our area, I just want to keep the lights on and the refrigerator running. Nothing big or to make us rich.
    Our needs are simple and it's how we live.

    Therefore I just wantomake.

    Leave a comment:


  • wantomake
    replied
    Originally posted by Turion View Post

    No, that was just a schematic to show that you can get the voltage output to do some things with. The higher the voltages you work with the more efficient some things become.


    The setup I am running on my bench right now is not the setup in the video I sent you either. That was a two battery setup running 50 watts. Right now I am running 30 watts on just a single battery looped system to see if it will hold with that much load. If not, I may have to drop down to 20 watts, or maybe 25.

    Just for fun, I added another 30 watts and it ran, but I don't know if it will hold the battery voltage and I didn't have time to run a test. But it sure made me happy to see three more bulbs light up.
    Ok. It's a good thing to get success like that with all the time and effort put into a project of idea.

    I kind of get what you're doing a the setup off of the boost of buck modules. No motor to pulse the charge battery because there's no charge battery in the setup. All the unused energy goes back to the source battery.

    I like using bulbs as a load also. It's a good start to maybe using an inverter instead as a load. There must be a proof of concept to your idea of it's for nothing.

    Thanks for the share of your test. I've most of today to build toward something successful is my hope.

    BroMikey you sure are lighting things up. I just finished putting together some lithium packs to experiment with today. Either the 3BGS or 4 battery switch I'll setup here in few minutes. Interesting setups you and Turion are using. I need to get going!!! Lol!!!
    ​​​​​​
    ​​​​​​

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Here is another Jim dandy. Don't forget your diodes aand capacitors or plan on replacing all of the burned up parts.

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    These are the circuits talked about for a number of year that allegedly produce the free energy

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  • BroMikey
    replied

    Originally posted by Turion View Post

    No, that was just a schematic to show that you can get the voltage output to do some things with.

    Just for fun, I added another 30 watts and it ran, but I don't know if it will hold the battery voltage and I didn't have time to run a test.
    Originally posted by Turion View Post

    After all this time and all the explaining I have done about how and why this works: "we don't know what is causing it to produce more" LOL
    recirculating power but the present day model does not understand that. I am content to let you explain.



    Last edited by BroMikey; 08-15-2022, 06:47 AM.

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  • Turion
    replied
    Originally posted by BroMikey View Post
    For whatever the reason this circuit did the opposite giving up more to the load while charging a 3rd battery. However impractical this proves that we don't know what is causing it to produce more which is theoretically impossible.

    ................................................
    After all this time and all the explaining I have done about how and why this works: "we don't know what is causing it to produce more" LOL

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  • Turion
    replied
    Originally posted by wantomake View Post

    Turion is this the system setup in your video? 350 volts dc is enough to cook with. Lol!
    No, that was just a schematic to show that you can get the voltage output to do some things with. The higher the voltages you work with the more efficient some things become.


    The setup I am running on my bench right now is not the setup in the video I sent you either. That was a two battery setup running 50 watts. Right now I am running 30 watts on just a single battery looped system to see if it will hold with that much load. If not, I may have to drop down to 20 watts, or maybe 25.

    Just for fun, I added another 30 watts and it ran, but I don't know if it will hold the battery voltage and I didn't have time to run a test. But it sure made me happy to see three more bulbs light up.

    Leave a comment:


  • BroMikey
    replied
    Okay I have a statement to make on the conclusion of the 3BGS I recently tested. The two 40 wh li ion batteries did an excellent job ang gave 40 wh and took 40wh to charge while connected to a 4-5watt load for a run time of 18 hours. This is how much was in the new batteries.

    Next I used the same two 40 wh batteries in a split the positive circuit and was able to get a run time of 22 hours and 109wh. It is required that you rest between charging, I did not. It took something like 9-11 runs meaning each run you remove and rotate batteries around.

    The conclusion is that some circuits can extend run time or can recirculate some of the energy. By normal standards such a system would only be considered a power waster because seemingly a 3rd battery is being charged while running a load in another branch. Conventional ideology says that out of the 80wh offered my load should come up short as compared to a standard run.

    For whatever the reason this circuit did the opposite giving up more to the load while charging a 3rd battery. However impractical this proves that we don't know what is causing it to produce more which is theoretically impossible.

    See video's above where a baseline watt hour was established discharging to exactly 11v and charging up to exactly 12.3v for the li ion packs. Calculations were made as to how much the watt meters consumed as well as the converter with it's powerful LED read out, In each test the same standard applied.

    ................................................
    Last edited by BroMikey; 08-15-2022, 04:25 AM.

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