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  • BroMikey
    replied
    [VIDEO]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M6EInBlv8A&t=753s[/VIDEO]

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  • Rakarskiy
    replied
    Kapitsa, a scientist and he is interested in the effect. Peruvian "this flywheel" in the form of a lever with a load, fixed rigidly, which creates a variable torque, rotating in different directions of the two flywheels.

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  • BroMikey
    replied
    Originally posted by Rakarskiy View Post
    In general, it does not shake
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    [VIDEO]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Df6Rfsi6zSY[/VIDEO]

    [VIDEO]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is_ejYsvAjY[/VIDEO]

    [VIDEO]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXjoIwxEXDs[/VIDEO]
    Last edited by BroMikey; 09-28-2018, 10:16 AM.

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  • Rakarskiy
    replied
    In general, it does not shake, it's an inverted pendulum. And he has quite a scientific justification. The Kapitsa pendulum.

    Kapitza's pendulum is a system consisting of a weights attached to a light, inextensible spoke that is attached to a vibrating suspension. The pendulum bears the name of Academician and Nobel Prize winner PL Kapitsa, who constructed in 1951 a theory for describing such a system. For a fixed suspension point, the model describes an ordinary mathematical pendulum, for which there are two equilibrium positions: at the lower point and at the upper point. In this case, the equilibrium of the mathematical pendulum at the upper point is unstable, and any arbitrarily small perturbation leads to a loss of equilibrium.

    An amazing feature of Kapitza's pendulum is that, contrary to intuition, the inverted (vertical) position of the pendulum can be sustained in the case of rapid suspension vibrations. Although such an observation was made back in 1908 by A. Stephenson, for a long time there was no mathematical explanation for the reasons for this stability. PL Kapitsa experimentally investigated such a pendulum, and also constructed a theory of dynamic stabilization, dividing the motion into "fast" and "slow" variables and introducing an effective potential. The work of PL Kapitza, published in 1951, opened a new direction in physics - vibration mechanics.


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  • BroMikey
    replied
    A sort of jiggly crank shaft wobbling. Shaking out free energy.

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