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Alexkor Air Core Coil Radiant Charger

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  • bolectrical
    replied
    Originally posted by Badger86 View Post
    Hi all,

    This is my first post to the forum.I am attempting the Alexkor circuit that doGalot is working on. I am very new to electronics and still have a lot to learn about the subject.

    I have posted my first attempts at constructing the circuit. I accidentally ordered a very large heat sink for the transistor which is what the large metal object is.

    I live off-grid in the UK and am looking for a way to be less reliant on my petrol generator less to charge my batteries. I emailed Patrick Kelly who has been really helpful and has guided me towards the Alexkor circuits as a good beginner's project,

    I have had some success with charging but I have not got the two batteries that I am attempting to charge up to a full charge within the 20 hours that they should. My next idea is to lower the resistance to the base of the transistor - by doing this though, I am ignoring the suggested resistance by Alexkor and I do not want to blow the transistor.

    I wonder if it would be possible for people to see if I have made any mistakes. If anybody has any suggestions I would be enormously grateful to them..

    Best wishes,
    Michael
    Hi members,

    Am not very new on the forum, only been inactive. Am not schooled in electronics, but have been reading for two years; first Patrick J. Kelly's (PJK book) chapter 12, NEETS Modules, Bedini SG, The 3 Handbooks, The Free Energy Secrets of Cold Electricity, The Quantum Key, plus a few sites here and there. Also in the process of building one of Don Smith's Magnetic System.

    I have built the Alexco circuit as presented in PJK pdf (downloaded May 2019) book and the first picture at the bottom of the post I am quoting now. I started with a single joule thief on an existing small trafo by using two of the coils. I designated the one with the highest resistance as my collector coli and the lower one for the base. Using 13003 transistor (and 10k var. resistor) also marked TR, 12v input from 2 small solar panels of about 5 watts each on two old car batteries. Circuit outputs 11 - 120v on dailing the var resistor. The Batteries charge up to about 12.5v from the panels and drain quickly with one 5 watt LED light in about 1 - 2 hour ranging.

    Been I trying to use it to revive an old UPS bat but the voltage of the circuit drops from 100 to about 55 when I connect the bat. From there, it starts falling slowly. The lowest it has fallen to about 29v. I feared leaving it on the night due to a fire or anything. The next day it starts again at 55v and slowly drops. According to my sound card-based view, the circuit seems to be running at about 20k Hz. The bat started with 400mv, after the night, I found it at 500mv, next about 600mv. (Will post pix later)

    What is happening here I need help. Thank you for your help.
    Last edited by bolectrical; 06-17-2020, 04:08 PM.

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  • Badger86
    replied
    Hi all,

    This is my first post to the forum.I am attempting the Alexkor circuit that doGalot is working on. I am very new to electronics and still have a lot to learn about the subject.

    I have posted my first attempts at constructing the circuit. I accidentally ordered a very large heat sink for the transistor which is what the large metal object is.

    I live off-grid in the UK and am looking for a way to be less reliant on my petrol generator less to charge my batteries. I emailed Patrick Kelly who has been really helpful and has guided me towards the Alexkor circuits as a good beginner's project,

    I have had some success with charging but I have not got the two batteries that I am attempting to charge up to a full charge within the 20 hours that they should. My next idea is to lower the resistance to the base of the transistor - by doing this though, I am ignoring the suggested resistance by Alexkor and I do not want to blow the transistor.

    I wonder if it would be possible for people to see if I have made any mistakes. If anybody has any suggestions I would be enormously grateful to them..

    Best wishes,
    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • alexelectric
    replied
    Greetings SkyWatcher

    good presentation of your progress.

    As soon as I can build a prototype, for now I am with a generator and anti lenz coils.

    but I comment something about charging battery.

    A long time ago I built a thief of joules, it fed several LEDs, it served me to read at night.

    The thief of joules fed it with a small motor, I put some blades on it, and I adapted it to a fan that I used to cool off at night, the motor served as a generator, which fed the thief of joules, and thus did not use a battery to power the thief of Joules, I turned on the LEDs and had a light, but at the same time I took advantage of the self-induction to charge the battery, charge a typical AAA battery, it was well charged.

    In this way do not drain or use another battery to charge and have light.
    Since the idea was to take advantage of the wind from the fan by means of a small motor, power the thief of joules to have a light and a charger.
    Last edited by alexelectric; 04-12-2020, 05:12 PM.

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  • alexelectric
    replied
    Originally posted by otten View Post
    Hi =)
    I'm new in this very interesting forum.
    Please help, and sorry for my english
    Only this thread about "Alexkor" system here?
    I have a some questions. In the PJK book, in chapter 7, we can see original scheme with one module (4 diodes). But there are another modified scheme see, where tree modules which contains 12 diodes summary, and one big capacitor C1 100uF 400v. If I put there 20 modules in parallel instead of 3, so what capacitor C1 must be there? 20 modules must give more power I think. Another moment with thyristor and neon tube. They will not die with 20 modules?
    Thanks!



    Hello greetings
    interesting Alexkor projects
    How are you doing with your project? What progress have you had?
    go ahead and good results appreciate you
    Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • doGalot
    replied
    I was wondering if they could be used to make coils? Multi-strand of course...

    Leave a comment:


  • citfta
    replied
    Sorry, I don't know of any projects that use Cat-6 cable. Maybe someone else will have some suggestions.

    Leave a comment:


  • doGalot
    replied
    Thank you for that explanation. I appreciate the step by step. I look forward to making one of these and try to post updates.

    on a side note - could you suggest some projects that I could try that uses Cat-6 cable? I have that and telephone wire I'd like to be useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • citfta
    replied
    Hi doGalot,

    Let's go through the circuit operation and see if that helps you understand why each part is there and what it does. When the power switch is turned on current then can flow from the battery to the coils. At this point the transistor is turned off so no current can flow through the part of the coil marked in red. Current can flow through the blue coil to the base of the transistor. The resistor is there to limit the amount of current that can go to the base so the base of the transistor is not burned out by too much current. When the voltage on the base of the transistor get high enough then current will start to flow from the base of the transistor through the emitter of the transistor and back to the negative of the battery. At the same time current will also begin to flow through the red coil and through the transistor back to the negative of the battery. When that current through the coil get high enough it will override the magnetic field produced by the blue coil and cause that coil to stop conducting. This then causes the transistor to turn off and that stops the current through the red coil. The cycle of on and off repeats many times per second.

    When the transistor turns of because of the current being stopped going to the base then the current going through the red coil can no longer get back to the primary battery. An amazing characteristic of a coil is that it resists any change in current going through it. Since the current wants to keep going it will now go to the diode and to the positive side of the batteries being charged. The interesting thing about that current is that it will produce a voltage high enough to get where ever it can go. So we can use a 12 volt battery to charge a 24 volt or even a 48 volt battery. If for some reason the charging batteries got disconnected the voltage would go high enough to force its way through the transistor. This would probably damage the transistor. So the neon is there to give that voltage spike a place to go in case something should become disconnected going to the batteries being charged.

    I forgot about the capacitor. But it is really only there to shape the pulse for better signal to the transistor. The circuit will work without it but it is better to have it there.


    I hope this has helped some.

    Carroll

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  • doGalot
    replied
    Thank you for your advice. I do understand the diode. Just IMHO there would also be one off the coil (horizontal red line) to keep any reverse flow to it. The Patrick Kelly pdf I'm looking at (Chpt 4 - The Alexkor Circuits) mentions the neon isn't needed if the fast-action diode is used. I could add it for safe measures...

    BTW - any update on OlTimer and any others? I appreciated reading the updates...

    Leave a comment:


  • citfta
    replied
    Yes you are missing something. You need to get a basic understanding of electronics before you take on a project like this. The neon is there to protect the transistor from voltage spikes so you don't want to build it without the neon. The other thing is you apparently don't understand is what a diode does. The diode from the neon and transistor connection blocks any back flow from the charging batteries to the primary battery and blocks any reverse flow back to the charging batteries. There are many places online where you can learn the basics of electronics. You wouldn't attempt to make a long trip in a country you have never been to without first learning how to read a map would you?

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  • doGalot
    replied
    Hello,

    I am a newbie and am very interested in this circuit. The one I am looking to make is the 'more advanced' one without the neon. One question I have is it seems to me (by the diagram) it would be short-circuiting from the last connection leaving the 'batteries being charged' (would be '-') and it is connected to the '+' going to the drive battery. Or am I missing something? sorry, wrong image. One I'm looking at has 2SC3552 and UF5408.

    Alexkor advanced.png





    Last edited by doGalot; 04-09-2020, 04:49 PM.

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  • citfta
    replied
    Hi again Paul,

    You are actually asking a pretty good question. Why indeed do we need a coil to charge a battery? We don't actually need a coil to charge the battery. A battery can be charged just fine with a constant voltage charger that is set a couple of volts above the normal charge level of the battery. So the question is why use a circuit with a coil in it to charge a battery?

    Most of the circuits that use a coil for battery charging are using the discharge of the coil to charge the battery. When a coil discharges the interesting thing about that is the coil discharge voltage will rise to a level higher than the original voltage used to charge the coil if the discharge current meets a resistance in the discharge circuit high enough to cause the voltage to rise. Why is this helpful?

    If a battery has not been used regularly for a while it will become sulphated. That means crystals of sulphation have built up on the plates of the battery. This causes the capacity of the battery to be lower and also raises the internal resistance of the battery. This limits the current the battery is able to deliver and the amount of power we can get back from the battery.

    As I just posted above when a coil discharges it has the interesting property of raising the output voltage to a high enough level to overcome the resistance of the discharge circuit. So if we use a coil circuit to charge a battery the effect is we can charge a battery that has become sulphated. The side benefit is that as we do that we remove the sulphation. I have personally seen many many batteries restored to a usable condition by using the Bedini SSG (simple school girl) circuit which uses the discharge of the coil to charge the battery. If the battery is in good condition pulse charging helps to keep the battery in good condition. There are now commercially available battery chargers that use pulse charging because of this benefit.

    Sorry for the long-winded post but I hope this has helped a little.

    Since I check this forum usually every day I will watch for when you can get back to your project. No hurry on my part. I have been at this for a long time.

    Take care,
    Carroll

    Leave a comment:


  • OldTimer
    replied
    Hi Carroll,

    Been quite hectic, and still are. So I'm going to have to ask you for a bit of patience, as I will not have time to work on this project for several days. But... I will come back after I've had the chance to test what you suggest, so bear with me :-)

    Regards,
    Paul

    PS what I can say, is that I don't just trust stuff I read ;-) I am curious to see how this behaves, as I'm no stranger to research. So I will not believe nor exclude anything upfront, and am trying to see with as neutral a view as I can what this circuit actually does. I must say that I've seen a lot of things in other areas/specializations that theoretically shouldn't be possible, but my take on it is that I then try to find out how the observations I have collected can exist (or if I am wrong). And so far, I've succeeded, at least for my own understanding. (can't put everything in an expensive double-blinded randomized trial, now can we :-) From that perspective, I am curious what your view is on why you'd use coils for charging at all. Why not without a coil? What is it that makes it beneficial to use a coil? Not trying to bundle a load of questions, because for me they are all the same: what is the value of that specific component in a charging circuit.
    Last edited by OldTimer; 05-20-2019, 07:57 AM.

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  • citfta
    replied
    Hi Paul,

    Well now things are looking more like a bad transistor. The voltage at the base should be stable. The fact it keeps dropping usually indicates the transistor is heating up which is what you have also confirmed. I think you have already changed the transistor once. Do you have any more you can try?

    With only .2 volts on the base the transistor should not have been heating up. One thing I did notice was that your neon has a resistor in series with it. That will cause the current to be limited going through the neon. That is normally what we would want if we were using the neon as an indicator light. But in this case we want the neon to act as a safety valve to catch the spikes in case the charging batteries were accidentally disconnected. By leaving the resistor connected to the neon you may be getting spikes with enough current to damage the transistor. I would remove the resistor. You might blow the neon if you get some really big spikes but with the way your circuit is working right now I don't think you will get spikes that big.

    Also when the neon is lit can you tell if only one of the electrodes inside is lighting the gas around it or are both electrodes lighting up. Only one electrode should be lit. That means the power going to the neon is DC. If both are lit then the power is AC. That may give us another clue as to what is going on.

    Do you have any other electronic parts? If you have a 10k pot we could try to modify the circuit a little to see if that gets it working properly. I guess I should have cautioned you before now that a lot of what you find on the internet is not very accurate and sometimes even very misleading. Also the page you got this from claims that you can keep 4 batteries charged up while only using one to do that. I don't know of anyone that has found that to actually be true. Eventually they will all be run down. But this circuit of using pulses to charge with is very good for rejuvenating batteries that are sulphated. And getting it to work can be a great learning experience.

    One other thing you can try is to insert some kind of core into the coil. It should be some kind of iron or steel. Some people have used the sleeves that come on concrete anchors and they seem to work pretty well. My coils for charging are made by winding the bifilar wire on to an empty one pound solder spool. This give me an inside core of about 1/2 inch which I fill with a bunch of pieces of electric fence wire cut to the length of the spool and packed inside the center of the spool until they are tight. Having a core and a lot more wire will give you much better charging. This may be another project for you after you get this one working properly.

    I also will be rather busy over the weekend but will try to check at least a couple of times to see if you have made any new discoveries.


    Take care,
    Carroll

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  • OldTimer
    replied
    Right. Now I have even less idea what the heck is going on than before. The results are:

    Without the cap and without charging batteries:
    Neon on straight away, voltage base/emitter 1.3, then settled slowly down to 0.59v, with neon going off at around 1.2v

    Without the cap and with charging batteries hooked up: neon does not light up, voltage base/emitter 2.6, then settled slowly to 0.59v

    With new cap and without charging batteries: eehhhmmm. I got -1.3 volts, with neon coming on sometimes and sometimes not, and then the voltage across base/emitter flipped from negative to postive and settled on 0.2v... ???

    With new cap and with charging batteries: I got 0.2 volts stable, but it seemed like the transistor was heating up, and before I could do anything else, the transistor starting smoking so I yanked the cables loose....

    And that's where I'm at now... no clue...

    Cheers,
    Paul

    Leave a comment:

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