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View Full Version : 3rd Stage Bedini Powered Milkovic


kcarring
04-10-2011, 10:38 AM
I had an idea, a variant of what I see being employed. What if the Milkovic Pendulum was stretched out (linear horizontal direction) and the Hammer End, and the Pendulum were both made of water containment devices, and the pendulum itself was completely non-magnetic material, a swinging jug if you will.
Then, the unit would be made tall enough such that the traditional Milkovic Pendulum actually swung a third oscillation stage, below it.. and that's where the Bedini came in, the smaller bob need only be pulsed, independantly, to then influence the upper, heavier "jug". A pulsed magnet bob if you will, swinging from the real Pendulums bottom.

My thought is you would pay, in energy, only the cost to keep the bottom pendulum swinging enough... to keep the upper pendulum, swinging enough to... keep the hammer pounding.

Gdez
04-10-2011, 11:07 AM
@kcarring,
Do you mean that the pendulum would have two pivots?

kcarring
04-10-2011, 11:12 AM
Well.."The Pendulum" (the heavy one full of water) would have a pivot point built into the bottom of it. A second smaller pendulum would hang below that and it would be the rotor for a bifilar coil, below it, at "base level". Or the other way around, the bottom pendulum could actually be a coil... and the Neo would be affixed to the "base" level, or ground level. Rather than fight the mass of the larger pendulum, influence a small mass, a 3rd Oscillator, once again, independent of the top 2 oscillators.

kcarring
04-10-2011, 11:19 AM
My reasoning for water containment on both the main pendulum and the hammer head is that, not only is water dense, and heavy, but... it is adjustable both in volume, and by changing the solution that goes in the tank, making the system adjustable even after completion of build.

Gdez
04-10-2011, 11:23 AM
Yes, I do think it would work.
Here are some links to thoughts I have on the idea:

Heretical Builders (http://www.hereticalbuilders.com/showpost.php?p=3820&postcount=19)

YouTube - gdez1000's Channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/gdez1000?feature=mhum#p/a/u/0/hOEqqVCiQ1c)
If you have already seen them, sorry for the repeat.

Gdez
04-10-2011, 11:26 AM
My reasoning for water containment on both the main pendulum and the hammer head is that, not only is water dense, and heavy, but... it is adjustable both in volume, and by changing the solution that goes in the tank, making the system adjustable even after completion of build.

Yes I have thought about the same thing before, but was wondering if say you had a gallon container,half filled would the water sloshing around inside affect the performance?
Another thing I like about the water idea is that you could drain and fill it easily for portability.

kcarring
04-10-2011, 12:15 PM
This is more advanced shape I envision, taking the above concept to the point of alternator design on the front end, wherein you have a hammerhead that follow circular arc, derived from the center point, the main pivot point. heavy neo magnets would be loaded into the front face of the hammerhead, and coils would be mounted on the stationary stator.

http://img813.imageshack.us/img813/7118/50332058.jpg

Gdez
04-10-2011, 12:19 PM
I like it and i think it would work.

kcarring
04-10-2011, 12:27 PM
I think like you say, no matter what you used as a fluid in the hammer rotor, the volume must be filled so there is no sloshing. But, that could be combinations of oil, water, and even denser fluids or to lighten, foam chips. till you got what you were after for mass. Once you had an idea of desired mass versus volume, put together a homogenius mixture of something to match it and fill it right up. In the main pendulum, the same might hold true, but who know's maybe a bit of sloshing would create inertia that was desirable.

kcarring
04-10-2011, 12:31 PM
I only drew the diagram as such so that one can grasp my pivot point concept. In reality the base, that which holds the entire unit to stand, may have a hollow central core, and provide "side arms" (like a pair of forks on a bicycle allow room for the wheel, yet provide side to side strengh). It's just easier to look at this way initially to envision the motion, and see how it can be done without obstruction, adding an oscillation stage to the 2-stage design, for purposes of Bedini power and further charging, from that coil's spikes. I forgot to add a return spring on the Hammer too.

Gdez
04-10-2011, 03:53 PM
Interesting. "but who know's maybe a bit of sloshing would create inertia that was desirable." Maybe the water sloshing would give it a leaning into effect. Think of how a sharp turn with a half full tanker truck can easily flip it over.

One other thing about the return spring on the hammer; Ideally, in my models, I would like to replace the springs with "work". But it is not as easily said as done. I did some experimenting around and if you look at milkovics lab water pump, he has a spring for the upstroke and downstroke. I think that ideally you would want to do away with the springs, and have a piston on the up and down stroke. But in my experiments I found that it was hard to control , while it was easy to adjust spring tension. Plus there is turbulance, hydruailc, and fluid dynamic factors involved. But with air( since it compresses) maybe you could throttle it to sort of replace the springs. On my models when I removed tension on the springs there was to much force and things would start breaking and bending( especially since I mostly do tack welds.) Once I get done with my garden project I try to get going on this again.

kcarring
04-10-2011, 08:54 PM
Interesting. "but who know's maybe a bit of sloshing would create inertia that was desirable." Maybe the water sloshing would give it a leaning into effect. Think of how a sharp turn with a half full tanker truck can easily flip it over.

One other thing about the return spring on the hammer; Ideally, in my models, I would like to replace the springs with "work". But it is not as easily said as done. I did some experimenting around and if you look at milkovics lab water pump, he has a spring for the upstroke and downstroke. I think that ideally you would want to do away with the springs, and have a piston on the up and down stroke. But in my experiments I found that it was hard to control , while it was easy to adjust spring tension. Plus there is turbulance, hydruailc, and fluid dynamic factors involved. But with air( since it compresses) maybe you could throttle it to sort of replace the springs. On my models when I removed tension on the springs there was to much force and things would start breaking and bending( especially since I mostly do tack welds.) Once I get done with my garden project I try to get going on this again.

Interesting Comments. I agree some work from the spring would be more ideal. It would be interesting to see how Lenz's law, and the "load" would play into all of this.

kcarring
04-11-2011, 05:24 AM
The diagram is in fact, still incorrect. It cannot be all central as shown, with the weight distribution 50-50. I've been doing a lot of examining of the situation, and it appears that the front end must be longer, which means the back end must be shorter, which in turn means the "cutaway" for the main bob must be deeper. Hope u follow me.