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View Full Version : Bedini magnet spacing and other ?'s


redrichie
06-02-2010, 04:29 PM
Im sorry if this has been discussed before, and i tried searching through previous posts. But...Is there an ideal placement for the magnets on a Bedini rotor? Ive read anywhere from 1-3 magnets spaces in between. But that is a little vague for me. In a precision machine there doesnt seem room for that kind of play. And if the rotor is actually being carried by the scalar south poles then it would seem that 3 magnets lengths is quite a large distance. Is there a difference between a huge rotor and many magnets and a smaller rotor with proportional # of magnets? Or is it just that a large rotor can be equipped with more coils to match the magnets?
If we force 2 N poles together to make the superpole, and the N is forced out to a laser beam strength, this is good right? then why dont we always use this method? Or have I not kept up on things and this is not a good method.
And sorry to be so inquisitive, but Bedini sells his kits and trans., and coils for us. He sells a large coil with a twisted set of 8 wires ready to go on a spool. Which is just awesome. His largest coil is about 450 turns, is he suggesting that this is an optimum Coil? Or is it optimum for the size of the 10 coiler for example? And one other thing. For a setup like the 10 coil with a big heavy rotor, are neos acceptable (or preferable) for moving this big mass. Thanks for your time. I hope someone can help me with these musings before my brain melts out of my ears.

Joit
06-02-2010, 06:54 PM
Hi,
about the Magnets, i only tried to have the right distance, that the S-Pole can nice fire through the both N Magnets.
When you have them to close togheter, the S Pole will look for a Way around the 2 close Magnets, and that is usual over the top and under.
But then the Pole is not really strong anymore.
About the ammount of the Magnets, i only did see, that more Magnets turn slower, but have the same Frequency as a Rotor with only ie 4 Magnets,
where the Rotor turns faster.
So, the SSG will anyway dictate the Frequency as someone showed in a Video.
But it depends at the Load a bit too, what Frequency actually is there.
And well, about the Coils, i think it is a bit a mystery how you really make it well.
When you write he use 4 Coils, then you need to adjust the (i assume) thicker one with the smaller gauge, that it match from the Impedance.
That are maybe things, where some maybe need still a lot more practice, to reproduce it.
All Coils i did make till yet did all turn out different.

Ted Ewert
06-02-2010, 08:20 PM
As far as the spacing goes, I would make the magnets far enough apart so that when one is being pushed away from the coil, the next one isn't affected by the coil's field. You can figure this out by manually pulsing your coil while bringing a magnet close to the north pole (from the side, like a magnet would be approaching on a rotor, not directly in line with the core). When you start to feel a push, that's your spacing.
I wouldn't worry too much about the "scalar south" either. In my experience it's the actual south pole that will cause you more problems.
With a single magnet, the south pole is only about a half inch away from the north. As Joit mentioned, a lot of that south pole is curving around to the north.
When your coil fires, it not only repels the north pole, but it also attracts that south pole. This defeats some of your mechanical torque.
If you stack 3 or 4 magnets on top of one another, this will physically isolate the south pole further from the coil, while also giving you a stronger north pole. This improves your rotor performance.
I don't know if I would characterize the monopole as a precision machine. It's an excellent learning tool, but it doesn't do much otherwise. Even if you get one to self run, the surplus energy is very marginal and isn't going to give you much of anything (battery charging included).
Bedini gifted us with the monopole because it was as much as he was allowed to reveal. However, it's only the seed from which actual energy producing machines can be built. Many of us who have pursued research beyond this device know this to be the case. There is much more you can do with a motor than what the SG presents.
Nevertheless, build one anyway by all means, just don't stop there. :thumbsup:

Ted

redrichie
06-03-2010, 01:35 AM
Well yeah build em for sure. Thats probably the most rewarding part for us. whats the next step beyond the bedini type motor? Is it a more advanced machine that is beyond the technical and financial attainment that your average intelligent human being cannot muster? Or is it to couple this type of machine to other devices (solar, earth battery, lidmotor/lasersaber coils, steam) to achieve energy independence? Could you please elaborate on what else this tech is good for? At least shine an LED in the direction where I may start to look?
I mean, the seed cant be releasing a simple device to the public, made from very accessible off the shelf parts. just to demonstrate how to make an extremely low torque motor/hobby for most. In hopes that a handful of people on the entire planet gets it. And if they do, 99.9 percent of those dont have the financial resources to do anything with it. Or be in the same boat as him and be suppressed as well. To what end? Cant be financially, because until relatively recently he wasnt selling his machines, they are open source.
Sorry to get off subject there. Thanks for the info Ted. Ill take all I can get. I know that a "small" machine is not going to produce the desired results most people are expecting. I am not naive enough to think that desktop size rotor is going to break me away from the grid, I know it is an example. A blueprint even. And understanding a simple model is the only way to ever achieve success in a big one. Is that all it will take a bigger one? Watson machine was big and caused a stir. Any public thoughts on where to take it after thorough understanding? What else are the motors good for?

redrichie
06-03-2010, 01:53 AM
Also I know that Li-Po, or other batteries of the such can be dangerous if not charged on a balance charger. But has anyone tried to charge this type of battery with these systems? Lead acid batteries cant be the only thing that bedinies can energize. And he calls them energizers, but he calls his Renaissance chargers just that, chargers. Any ideas on that?

juju
06-03-2010, 03:40 AM
whats the next step beyond the bedini type motor? Is it a more advanced machine that is beyond the technical and financial attainment that your average intelligent human being cannot muster? Or is it to couple this type of machine to other devices (solar, earth battery, lidmotor/lasersaber coils, steam) to achieve energy independence?


The bedini motor by itself will never give you energy independence... its just a way of harness the energy that is wasted in a motor, and making them more efficient. You can have one of the size of your house, even if you can make it 100% efficient, you will only have out, what you putted in, plus you have the movement of the wheel.

If you can put it to self run... its only a "non stop" machine, no extra energy!

Connect it to a solar panel or wind tower, is a good choice to charge a battery bank... and you can use huge stubblefield coils (lasersaber/lidmotor replicas) to run it... thats a good idea to! but eventually the iron of the coils will corrode by galvanic action.. and will not last forever!



I am not naive enough to think that desktop size rotor is going to break me away from the grid, I know it is an example. A blueprint even. And understanding a simple model is the only way to ever achieve success in a big one. Is that all it will take a bigger one? Watson machine was big and caused a stir. Any public thoughts on where to take it after thorough understanding? What else are the motors good for?

at this time the only thing this motors are good for, is to play with them, and to charge batterys! :D

hugs

Ted Ewert
06-03-2010, 02:11 PM
Well yeah build em for sure. Thats probably the most rewarding part for us. whats the next step beyond the bedini type motor? Is it a more advanced machine that is beyond the technical and financial attainment that your average intelligent human being cannot muster? Or is it to couple this type of machine to other devices (solar, earth battery, lidmotor/lasersaber coils, steam) to achieve energy independence? Could you please elaborate on what else this tech is good for? At least shine an LED in the direction where I may start to look?
I mean, the seed cant be releasing a simple device to the public, made from very accessible off the shelf parts. just to demonstrate how to make an extremely low torque motor/hobby for most. In hopes that a handful of people on the entire planet gets it. And if they do, 99.9 percent of those dont have the financial resources to do anything with it. Or be in the same boat as him and be suppressed as well. To what end? Cant be financially, because until relatively recently he wasnt selling his machines, they are open source.
Sorry to get off subject there. Thanks for the info Ted. Ill take all I can get. I know that a "small" machine is not going to produce the desired results most people are expecting. I am not naive enough to think that desktop size rotor is going to break me away from the grid, I know it is an example. A blueprint even. And understanding a simple model is the only way to ever achieve success in a big one. Is that all it will take a bigger one? Watson machine was big and caused a stir. Any public thoughts on where to take it after thorough understanding? What else are the motors good for?

All good points and good questions. What the Bedini machine shows can be used as a part of a larger motor which which actually generates power. High inductance coils, as many of us here have found, can be very efficient when configured correctly. Neodymium magnets can be switched on and off using a variety of techniques developed by guys like Joe Flynn and Jack Hilden-Brand. When you combine these elements into a motor, there is potential for some real power. Don't limit yourself just to Bedini, study other motor makers like Doug Konzen, Adams, Aspden, etc.
The point is that we need to learn the technologies which will provide us with free energy, and then apply them. It's an uphill battle but well worth the effort.

Ted