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ren
05-29-2008, 09:17 PM
Hey Troops, another vid uploaded on the tube.

YouTube - 24 volt Bedini Cap Pulser (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oapvf7wVtw)

running on 24 volts, 1 amp, capacitive discharge into second bank. Ive successfully swapped banks (on 12 volt) for 5 days, letting batteries rest at night. Resting voltage of both batteries has been above 12.40 every morning. I dont have enough good batteries to run it on 24 volts, but as you can see it really gets up to speed. Id recommend building the cap pulser for anyone interested in battery swapping:thumbsup:

Sephiroth
05-29-2008, 09:51 PM
sounds like an engine reving up! Great Work!

I finally got my cap pulser working today but not 5 minutes ago fried my last scr :wall: gonna have to buy some better ones online :(

It works fine pulsing the cap, but when I connect the cap to the battery it sparks and dies... perhaps I need a diode between the scr and the charging battery as well...

ren
05-29-2008, 11:17 PM
Sep are you using the schematic with 555 and h11d1 opto isolator? Or are you just using an scr?

theremart
05-30-2008, 12:37 AM
Nice setup!


Ya, I can relate to that running out of batteries. One of my batteries died during test so I have to start all over :( So... I waiting for a replacement battery, in the mean time I am recharging all the batteries back up. (11 Batteries ) They don't have far to charge up, but I really wanted to see how long this would go. Kills me I had to stop this one.

I had my battery swapper running for over 60 hours, and here is the results as I logged them..

Starting group of 24 batteries.
Batteries set to swap at 11 hour intervals
Banks of 24V 8 Golf 4 Deep cycle.. Pulling 1.5 Amp
Using 6 transitors on 4 coils.

Bank1 Bank2 Bank3 Bank4
24.2 26.0 26.0 26.0 11:52 AM 5/24/2008
25.5 24.2 25.5 25.5 11:10 PM 5/24/2008
25.6 24.1 25.6 25.6 5:59 AM 5/25/2008
25.2 25.2 24.9 25.2 11:43 AM 5/25/2008
25.2 25.2 24.7 25.2 6:15 PM 5/25/2008
* Note found that bank 4 Deep cycle battery went down to 12 V
adjusting the amp draw to high speed. .6 amp for this bank at 5 hours in.
25.3 25.3 25.3 24.5 12:49 AM 5/26/2008
24.5 25.2 25.2 25.2 7:47 AM 5/26/2008
* Back to 1.5 amp
24.0 25.5 25.5 25.5 1:45 PM 5/26/2008
25.2 24.0 25.2 25.2 11:10 PM 5/26/2008
25.2 25.2 24.4 25.2 9:53 AM 5/27/2008
25.2 25.2 24.2 25.2 2:29 PM 5/27/2008

Sephiroth
05-30-2008, 06:09 AM
using a neon triggered scr with a 220mf cap

Sephiroth
06-07-2008, 05:58 PM
I killed all my SCRs so I thought I would give it a go with a 2N3055 transistor (always have a couple knocking around!)

Here is the schematic I am using

564

using this on my modified computer fan...

It is running on 90ma and discharges the 220mf capacitor from around 80v to 30v every 5 seconds. not bad...

interestingly this is with multiple pulses per north pole pass... when using single pulses per pass it runs on 150ma (this fan was originally rated at about 380ma) but only discharges the capacitor every 16 seconds :thinking:

Sephiroth
06-07-2008, 06:02 PM
oh, I forgot to ask...

wouldn't a transistor be better for this than an SCR?

an SCR pulser would have a sharp switching on time though the switching off time would be gradual (voltage would drop until the battery and capacitor are at equal voltage)...

though with a transistor there would be a sharp switch on, and a sharp switch off... isn't this more desirable?

ren
06-09-2008, 05:07 AM
Hi Sep, while I cant be sure whether a transistor would be better I can say I have no reason to doubt JB's schematics. And there is a transistor in there, it is the one that triggers the scr to fire. I believe the SCR is used because it has the lowest voltage drop across its terminals.

If the moderators dont have a problem with it Id be happy to do a CD pulser walk through for all those that want to build the 555 circuit. Its a handy one to have, you could modify it to serve many functions. If people are interested and its all good, I'll post some drawings up for those that may be a little unsure of how to compile it all.

Sephiroth
06-09-2008, 09:04 AM
Hi Ren,

Yeah, I saw JBs schematic with the transistor and SCR. The only purpose for the transistor I could think of would be if the trigger voltage wasn't high enough to trigger the SCR he uses but would trigger the transistor ok which would then trigger the SCR. Like a darlington pair.

Though after testing this method of pulsing the cap I have found it doesn't work very well compared to charging the batteries directly. I think it may be because the voltage in the caps is too high when triggered with a neon.

I would appreciate a simple 555 schematic to try! :thumbsup:

Cheers!

ren
06-09-2008, 10:37 AM
Hey Sep, I think your right, the transistor/scr arrangement amplifies the signal much like a darlington pair would. The H11d1 opto isolator is there so there is no direct link to the 555, thus protecting it. You may notice some similarities to the 555 circuitry on this page here:

http://tacashi.tripod.com/elctrncs/555sstc/555sstc.htm

Ok, to start with, I have attached a drawing of Johns schematic with a couple of extras which arent necessary, but can help beginners such as myself. If moderators find this a breach of copyright then please remove with my apologies, I know of two places on the net where this schematic is posted in full so I saw no problem with it. Once again, it is Johns schematic not mine, I have only added a couple of things.

Get yourself a little PCB prototype board, preferably like the one in the picture below. It spaces out the pins and makes soldering and joining them SO much easier! Remember each pin on the 555 and the opto must be isolated from each other, important to note if you can only get a PCB prototype board with rows and not separate pin holes!

Also, in the interest of simplicity get a 555 cradle and a 6 pin optoisolator cradle (machined pins if possible) this will save you soldering directly to the components themselves, most likely destroying them if you arent careful. This way you can swap them in and out if you damage them too. Take note of the pin references of each component carefully, especially the opto isolator. There are heaps of places on the net if you want diagrams for specific components.

Pins 8 and 4 on the 555 are joined together, so are 2 and 6. I put an extra cap between 8 & 4 (+) and 1 (-) to smooth out the voltage going to the 555. I was told JB said this is a good idea. 10 uF cap should do fine. The 1 uF cap is specified at 600volts I think but mine worked with a 63 volt 1uF cap. Resistor between 8/4 and 7 and second resistor between 7 and 2/6. I found you could vary the dump speed by varying this resistor. Maybe use a 10k and a 150k pot. Pin 3 is the output and it loops through the H11d1 before returning to ground through another resistor. I put a small 12v LED between 3 and pin 1 of the opto to show the pulse frequency. It is also a good indicator of whether it is working and whether you have left it connected. It will pulse away as soon as your primary battery is connected and all switches are on, EVEN IF THE WHEEL ISNT ROTATING. Only draws about 40ma or so, but it will flatten the battery if left connected.

Pin 3 and pin 6 on the opto arent used. Take note of the way you install the cradle and make sure your opto goes in the right way, same goes for the 555. There is a little notch cut out of both which signifies the top. 1 and 2 on the opto are pretty self explanatory, same with 4 and 5. 5 goes directly to the negative of the charge battery, or to make things easier, just connect it to the anode of the SCR. The Collector of the transistor is also connected to the SCR's anode. The cathode of the SCR goes to the negative terminal of the cap.

For the triggering transistor I couldnt find the one specified so I just tried to match basic charateristics. The 2n3440 or the MJE340 have both worked for me, they are both 300v rated. You may even find a 2n3055 will work ok, if you use a larger capacitor, say in the 1000's of uF's. I believe Aaron has used others here successfully too.The collector of your transistor connects to the anode and the emitter connects to the SCR's gate. The base of the transistor is triggered by the opto, pin 4. It makes sense when you trace the lines on the diagram. Please note if you use the MJE 340 the pins are reversed. What ever transistor you use, google it for a spec sheet to make sure you got everything right.

Take your time, especially with the 555 and opto. The pins can be a little trickey but if you have a cradle for them both you can afford to be a little reckless when soldering:thumbsup: Just make sure there are no shorts between the pins.

And as always, I must state that I am no pro, and if anyone else has info or deems some of the above unecessary or incorrect please dont hesitate to post. Enjoy:cheers:


PS oh and by the way, the 555 is limited to 18 volts input, so if you want to run your front end higher than that then it needs a separate source. For the 24 volt cap pulser I posted above I used a 3 pin voltage regulator to automatically drop input voltage to 12 volts. The voltage regulator is good for 35 volts on the front I think, with a 1 amp output max. Thats heaps as the 555 only needs 40 ma or so.

Sephiroth
06-09-2008, 11:04 AM
Great write up Ren, and thanks for the schematic!

I have everything I need to build it, except the opto isolater, and as I said, the scr :( ... though do you think would it be possible to omit the opto isolator if a relay was used instead of the scr?

ren
06-09-2008, 11:36 AM
hmmm. You could have a go I guess. The output from the 555 pin 3 could go through the relays coil and back to ground. Probably wouldnt need the resistor as the relays coil would provide resistance, but I could be wrong. You could hear the relay click if it was working so you wouldnt need the LED light I put in there either.

Try it, at the very least you will get a feel for the 555 and get your hands dirty!

You will have to source the parts over the net otherwise. Farnell is a good spot to try, they post most places. Thats where I got my optos and 2n3440's.

Let us know how you go.

Sephiroth
06-09-2008, 11:41 AM
lol! that was easy.... already put it together and it works.... haven't tried the relay yet but the led is flashing...

though it is flashing steadily. approx 1 second on then 1 second off... is that what it is supposed to do? I thought it would only pulse briefly... I used a potentiometer for the 150kohm resistor and fiddling with that adjusts the speed of the flashing, but how do you adjust the on time?

ren
06-09-2008, 12:11 PM
Good work Sep, that was fast! Im not sure how to adjust on time, Im not sure its that important in this configuration. If you want to delve deeper into the 555 look here 555 Timer/Oscillator Tutorial (http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/555/555.html)

Mine will go from about that (1 sec on 1 sec off) to on/off so fast it just looks like its on when I vary resistance. Im guessing thats what its supposed to do.

Perhaps pin 7 and 6 come into play when considering on time. Let us know how you go.:cheers: :thumbsup:

ren
06-14-2008, 07:37 AM
Hey Sep I think I figured out how to adjust pulse frequency. Check out this doc.

http://www.aquapulser.com/docs/D14.pdf

look for the 555 section and note the three different capacitances with the rotatry switch:thumbsup:

Sephiroth
06-21-2008, 12:41 PM
Thanks Ren!

I have a 555 circuit triggering a relay exactly as I want it to now... split second on time with variable off time.

Though can't get the scr circuit to work now! I think the problem is the SCR I am using... it looks like the raw output of my device is high enough to keep the SCR on so it doesn't turn off to charge the cap.

Oh well... the relay seems to work anyway! :thumbsup:

ren
06-21-2008, 11:59 PM
hmm. Perhaps your scr is damaged. What part number is it?

Sephiroth
06-22-2008, 01:03 AM
lol... I damaged about 6 of them! By damaged i mean blew up in a puff of smoke. :D they are not suited for the job but are the only scrs I can get (unless I buy them online.)

Part number : CP106D

Need bigger ones. I know the last one I tried was still working because I tested it manually afterwards.

ren
06-22-2008, 01:54 AM
hmmm. Couldnt find any specs online for it. Gotta love the little puffs of smoke.

I only have one 800v 16 amp scr available here without going online for some. I can post ya a few if you want, they are about $4 each:thumbsup:

Sephiroth
06-22-2008, 03:07 AM
Thanks Ren, that's very generous of you to offer, though I will get some online eventually :D I like to buy a load of componants at once to save on the postage. (I'm a cheapskate!)

Though I'm very happy with how the relay is performing at the moment so I'll do some load tests with this method before trying the SCR.

Thanks again!

ren
06-22-2008, 06:43 AM
No worries mate, if you want some let me know, they have worked well for me.

Lol at the bulk buy. I went into the local shop the other day and brought $10 worth of 1n914 diodes. Only wanted one, but just got sick of never having one!

Ill never run out now!!!

How does the relay go at charging?

Sephiroth
06-22-2008, 10:03 AM
pretty good though still doing load tests... I have it set to charge a 1000uf cap up to 50v then it discharges down to 25v every second when charging a 12v battery.

ren
06-23-2008, 06:54 AM
A good tip I learned from John K on the monopole forums was to use an analogue meter to read the potential of the voltage dump. I have a analogue gauge good for 10/50/250 volts. Gives you a good idea of whats going on.

On a side note I switched on my solid state device the other day without a load to see how high the voltage went in the cap. The cap is only small, its 33uF 250 v but it shot up to over 300 volts almost instantaneously off 24v input. Gave me a little scare:D

mlindeblom
07-31-2008, 11:08 PM
I am doing a series of tests on various capacitor sizes and various timings.

To simplify the timing I used a Atmel Attiny13 micro ($1.51 at Digikey). It allows virtually any timing ratio. I have used 30 msecs on, 70 msec off thru 120 msec on and 190 msec off.

I have used from 470 uF thru 40,000 uF.

I am having difficulty in determining the optimum arrangement of capacitors and timings.

Yes you blow parts if you allow the discharge current to get too high.

I am using PS2532 opto couplers and S8055 SCR's.

Many people seem to recommend large capacitors and about 2 volts above the charge battery voltage.

Does anybody have some experience to guide which dirrection gives the best COP's, etc other than the usual answer of it depends?

ashtweth
08-01-2008, 04:48 AM
Great Vid Ren, thanks for this. Really gives me confidence on the Relay on the Fan kit we have, ill be teting that soon, got 3 bats conditioned for it, i think the fan kit is a cap pulser, Be nice if you had a load on that shaft, i bet you could some where.

Ash

ren
08-01-2008, 10:29 AM
Thanks Ash, yeah the shaft could do with a load, but I was primarily interested in the capacitive discharge. Look forward to seeing your fan replication:thumbsup:


By the way Ash, where are you located?

@mlindeblom. I can only speak from what I have tested and I have found the larger uF caps performed better in my experiments with my batteries. It did depend though, I used a really small cap, 33uF 250v on a solid state number that works well too, especially on smaller batteries. Im sorry I cant offer you much more than that.

mlindeblom
08-01-2008, 11:22 PM
Thanks for the reply.

It appears the question is more complex than it appears on the surface.

I highly recommend using a micro instead of a 555. I changed timing from 30 msec on and 170 msec off to 30 msec on and 2470 msec off in less than 5 minutes.

I think the reason many people blow SCR's is they under estimate the surge currents involved. The lower voltage ranges 2 to 5 volts above charge battery are much safer to start with. Measure the voltage across the SCR. The effective resistance of an SCR is in the low milli ohm range.

ashtweth
08-03-2008, 09:32 AM
Thanks Ash, yeah the shaft could do with a load, but I was primarily interested in the capacitive discharge. Look forward to seeing your fan replication:thumbsup:


By the way Ash, where are you located?

@mlindeblom. I can only speak from what I have tested and I have found the larger uF caps performed better in my experiments with my batteries. It did depend though, I used a really small cap, 33uF 250v on a solid state number that works well too, especially on smaller batteries. Im sorry I cant offer you much more than that.

Hi Ren sorry mate i missed this one. Am in Brisy mate, we are just about to goto the truckers strike on Monday with boosters and web site, they will also be reading your window motor Doc too:D

ren
08-04-2008, 12:03 AM
Cool mate! Sounds good. If your ever down Sydney way (central Coast) gimmie a yell:thumbsup:

selamatg
08-04-2008, 07:49 PM
Hey Sep, I think your right, the transistor/scr arrangement amplifies the signal much like a darlington pair would. The H11d1 opto isolator is there so there is no direct link to the 555, thus protecting it. You may notice some similarities to the 555 circuitry on this page here:

http://tacashi.tripod.com/elctrncs/555sstc/555sstc.htm

Ok, to start with, I have attached a drawing of Johns schematic with a couple of extras which arent necessary, but can help beginners such as myself. If moderators find this a breach of copyright then please remove with my apologies, I know of two places on the net where this schematic is posted in full so I saw no problem with it. Once again, it is Johns schematic not mine, I have only added a couple of things.

Get yourself a little PCB prototype board, preferably like the one in the picture below. It spaces out the pins and makes soldering and joining them SO much easier! Remember each pin on the 555 and the opto must be isolated from each other, important to note if you can only get a PCB prototype board with rows and not separate pin holes!

Also, in the interest of simplicity get a 555 cradle and a 6 pin optoisolator cradle (machined pins if possible) this will save you soldering directly to the components themselves, most likely destroying them if you arent careful. This way you can swap them in and out if you damage them too. Take note of the pin references of each component carefully, especially the opto isolator. There are heaps of places on the net if you want diagrams for specific components.

Pins 8 and 4 on the 555 are joined together, so are 2 and 6. I put an extra cap between 8 & 4 (+) and 1 (-) to smooth out the voltage going to the 555. I was told JB said this is a good idea. 10 uF cap should do fine. The 1 uF cap is specified at 600volts I think but mine worked with a 63 volt 1uF cap. Resistor between 8/4 and 7 and second resistor between 7 and 2/6. I found you could vary the dump speed by varying this resistor. Maybe use a 10k and a 150k pot. Pin 3 is the output and it loops through the H11d1 before returning to ground through another resistor. I put a small 12v LED between 3 and pin 1 of the opto to show the pulse frequency. It is also a good indicator of whether it is working and whether you have left it connected. It will pulse away as soon as your primary battery is connected and all switches are on, EVEN IF THE WHEEL ISNT ROTATING. Only draws about 40ma or so, but it will flatten the battery if left connected.

Pin 3 and pin 6 on the opto arent used. Take note of the way you install the cradle and make sure your opto goes in the right way, same goes for the 555. There is a little notch cut out of both which signifies the top. 1 and 2 on the opto are pretty self explanatory, same with 4 and 5. 5 goes directly to the negative of the charge battery, or to make things easier, just connect it to the anode of the SCR. The Collector of the transistor is also connected to the SCR's anode. The cathode of the SCR goes to the negative terminal of the cap.

For the triggering transistor I couldnt find the one specified so I just tried to match basic charateristics. The 2n3440 or the MJE340 have both worked for me, they are both 300v rated. You may even find a 2n3055 will work ok, if you use a larger capacitor, say in the 1000's of uF's. I believe Aaron has used others here successfully too.The collector of your transistor connects to the anode and the emitter connects to the SCR's gate. The base of the transistor is triggered by the opto, pin 4. It makes sense when you trace the lines on the diagram. Please note if you use the MJE 340 the pins are reversed. What ever transistor you use, google it for a spec sheet to make sure you got everything right.

Take your time, especially with the 555 and opto. The pins can be a little trickey but if you have a cradle for them both you can afford to be a little reckless when soldering:thumbsup: Just make sure there are no shorts between the pins.

And as always, I must state that I am no pro, and if anyone else has info or deems some of the above unecessary or incorrect please dont hesitate to post. Enjoy:cheers:


PS oh and by the way, the 555 is limited to 18 volts input, so if you want to run your front end higher than that then it needs a separate source. For the 24 volt cap pulser I posted above I used a 3 pin voltage regulator to automatically drop input voltage to 12 volts. The voltage regulator is good for 35 volts on the front I think, with a 1 amp output max. Thats heaps as the 555 only needs 40 ma or so.

Hi Ren,

I have try built the timer as your explaination above.
and I put a small 12v LED between 3 and pin 1 of the opto to see the pulse frequency too.. the circuit is work without OPTO connected (the LED on and off) but when I put the OPTO on.. the LED is goes off.
this happen even I only connect pin 1 and 2 of the OPTO.

I have try with 5 opto with same result.

Please anyone can assist me on this problem.

Thank and regards,

Selamatg

ren
08-05-2008, 05:49 AM
Hi check your pins on your opto isolator. You need to be using the right ones on the front end. The led needs to flow through the optos pins on one side and into the resistance and back to ground. If its not hooked up right you wont complete the circuit and the led wont light :thumbsup:

Is it possible that your led is blown? I used a 12v led, Im not sure if thats essential or not. The led is like a diode too I think, it needs to be installed the right way. Sounds like you have had luck anyway, its probably just how you have your opto isolator wired up. Look up a tech sheet for the part you are using if it isnt the h11d1. Trace your finger from your output pin on the 555 through the led and then through the h11d1(or other) into the resistance then back to negative. Once you get that going you can figure out the other side.

By the way. I put that led in the circuit when I was learning it for a visual reference, it probably should be taken out once you are competent with the configuration.

selamatg
08-05-2008, 12:08 PM
Sorry Ren,

The positive LED I put to 555 #3 and the negative LED to - Battery (joint to 555 #1) just to make sure timer work ok.
Thank for your advice, I will try as you said to make sure the OPTO working too :thanks:

By the way, how to check H11D1 still good condition? I meant to make sure Pin 4 and 5 doing the job as should be.

ren
08-05-2008, 09:24 PM
the negative leg of the led goes to the h11d1. Then it flows out through the resistor to ground. ground in this case can be the negative leg of the 555 timer. Or hook it up to the negative of the little cap you put over the 555s terminals, doest matter too much.

I guess you could check to see if your h11d1 circuit is working by putting another led on the other pins. Look at the h11d1's configuration. The left hand side is where we put our input signal through. Pins 1 and 2.

The right hand side is opticallly connected to the left hand side, when the signal flows through the left the base of the transistor on the right is triggered. This is why it is called an opto isolator, it effectively isolates the source components (the 555 in this case) from the load, which in this case is the scr switching the high voltage off the capacitor/bridge.


You can wire up pins 4 and 5 like any npn transistor. When your signal flows through pins 1 and 2 your npn transistor should fire/complete the circuit.

selamatg
08-07-2008, 01:39 PM
Thank you Ren for your explaination.:thumbsup:

Finally I can figure out and tested my OPTO, I found three already broken and the other still work ok.:thanks:

theremart
08-08-2008, 12:20 AM
the negative leg of the led goes to the h11d1. Then it flows out through the resistor to ground. ground in this case can be the negative leg of the 555 timer. Or hook it up to the negative of the little cap you put over the 555s terminals, doest matter too much.

I guess you could check to see if your h11d1 circuit is working by putting another led on the other pins. Look at the h11d1's configuration. The left hand side is where we put our input signal through. Pins 1 and 2.

The right hand side is opticallly connected to the left hand side, when the signal flows through the left the base of the transistor on the right is triggered. This is why it is called an opto isolator, it effectively isolates the source components (the 555 in this case) from the load, which in this case is the scr switching the high voltage off the capacitor/bridge.


You can wire up pins 4 and 5 like any npn transistor. When your signal flows through pins 1 and 2 your npn transistor should fire/complete the circuit.


Ok so can I take a 9V battery on pins 1 and 2, and put an led on pins 4 and 5 to test the h11d1? Thanks for helping us out Ren!.

Or can I use it in a SSG circuit to test the h11d1 ( replace the transistor with the h11d1)


mart

ren
08-08-2008, 01:23 AM
From my understanding Mart something like that would work. But remember the h11d1 is rated for low ma, 500ma I think. I think it doesnt have a strong output too, and that is perhaps why another npn transistor is used to switch on the SCR. I could be totally off the ball here I dont know.

I would plug the + terminal of a 9v battery to led/pin one, and put a 300 odd ohm resistor out of pin 2 going back to the negative of the nine volt. You could hook up 4 and 5 to a really small load, like another led or tiny grain of wheat bulb etc. The whole idea here is just to see if it switches. I havent blown one yet, I think they are pretty sturdy as long as you buy the little cradle for it and arent soldering directly to the legs.

Hook your tiny load up from 12v positive to collector (pin 5?) and then hook emitter (pin 4?) to negative of same 12v battery. It should be like an sg hookup except the load replaces the coil. When the 9v on the front end is a complete circuit it should trigger the base of the back end and your load should receive power. I think an even easier way to check the back end is just to trigger pin 6 to test out 5 and 4.

If anyone has a better method please post it up:thumbsup:

selamatg
08-08-2008, 03:46 PM
Hi Mart,


I made simple tester for OPTO H11D1, Maybe you are interest.
The both Led must on if The OPTO still good condition. other ways is broken.

Hope that will help.

mlindeblom
08-08-2008, 04:53 PM
Hi Mart,


I made simple tester for OPTO H11D1, Maybe you are interest.
The both Led must on if The OPTO still good condition. other ways is broken.

Hope that will help.
You will want to add some current limiting resistors unless the LEDs have built in current limiting. 330 ohms is a common value for this series connect resistor.

selamatg
08-08-2008, 05:03 PM
Yes you right,

The resistor is not on that schematic, or you can change the led with 12V bulb anyway. I use simple schematic software, I can't find the bulb on the component list.

Thanks:thumbsup:

Kingman
08-11-2008, 02:20 PM
Selamatg, I want to let you know that I built your Opto tester and it works great!!!!! :thumbsup: I was able to test my 4N33's and 4N35 opto-isolators before I put them in my 555 timer circuit just to be sure that they were working correctly! I made mine on a proto board so I can keep it in my tool box. The next thing I want to build is a simple 555 tester and also incorporate and SCR in with it so it can test the 555 and SCR at the same time. I used an 8 pin cradle because I didn't have a 6 pin cradle available to pop in and out the IC chip. Good work Selamatg! You don't by chance have a 555 test circuit?

Thanks so much!

ThereMart, Have you considered using LATCHING relays in your battery swapper circuit? The cool thing about a latching relay is you do not have to hold power on the coil in the relay to hold it in a state of NC or NO. You just pulse the relay to change it from one state to another. I will be using this sceme to build my battery swapper in conjuction of using the circuitry in the UPS such as alarm triggers to change a relay state when the primary batt. is running low on charge. :thinking:

Stephen
***Do the thing and you will get the energy to do the thing!***

theremart
08-11-2008, 04:52 PM
Selamatg, I want to let you know that I built your Opto tester and it works great!!!!! :thumbsup: I was able to test my 4N33's and 4N35 opto-isolators before I put them in my 555 timer circuit just to be sure that they were working correctly! I made mine on a proto board so I can keep it in my tool box. The next thing I want to build is a simple 555 tester and also incorporate and SCR in with it so it can test the 555 and SCR at the same time. I used an 8 pin cradle because I didn't have a 6 pin cradle available to pop in and out the IC chip. Good work Selamatg! You don't by chance have a 555 test circuit?

Thanks so much!

ThereMart, Have you considered using LATCHING relays in your battery swapper circuit? The cool thing about a latching relay is you do not have to hold power on the coil in the relay to hold it in a state of NC or NO. You just pulse the relay to change it from one state to another. I will be using this sceme to build my battery swapper in conjuction of using the circuitry in the UPS such as alarm triggers to change a relay state when the primary batt. is running low on charge. :thinking:

Stephen
***Do the thing and you will get the energy to do the thing!***

Hi,

I considered it, but since I have 2 of them built already, I am not really wanting to change my design. My next step is rewriting the software so I can do only 2 or 3 sets of batteries instead of 4.

Yes it would take less power, but the relays as I recall are more expensive.
And I put the watt meter on this and it only draws 1 watt of power.

selamatg
08-11-2008, 05:03 PM
Hi Stephen,

Good if you happy with the circuit...:D
Basically I'm not the expert with this electronic stuff, So far I'm learning from the internet too...LOL
I have fun with this new hobby..specially when knew how the component work...

Here is the 555 tester circuit, I found this circuit from the net and edited a bit.
Hope will help.

Selamatg

Kingman
08-11-2008, 06:37 PM
Selamatg, thanks a bunch for the schematic for the 555 timer. I'm going to build it like I did your opto tester plus do a modification to add the SCR and output that to drive a LED to show proper function. On the 555 timer circuit I'll used a 150K pot so I can adjust the duty cycle.

When using the 555 circuit the one thing I'm concerned with is the length of the off time when dumping caps into the battery. It seems like to me the off time cycle doesn't need to be that long. I agree with Seph in that it is desirable for a very short time to dump the caps into the charge battery like a few miliseconds. What happens in the SG while the caps are dumping and you are still having coil charge and collapses going on? :thinking: I wonder what happens to the energy created during the capacitor dump cycle?? That might be a question for Peter L.

:thanks: Stephen

selamatg
08-12-2008, 01:03 AM
Hi Stephen,


You can put additional diode parallel with R2 ( Pin 2/6 goes to cathode and Pin 7 goes to anode)
Here the link I learn from.. 555 and 556 Timer Circuits (http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/555timer.htm)

Selamatg