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Jan H
05-29-2008, 01:42 PM
A wise man once said:
"so if you can't go home, and build a cold electricity circuit from old nylon records, aluminum foil, paperclips and magnets. IT'S NOT MY FAULT."
:notworthy:

Okay so Peters lecture on EV gray and Tesla inspired me to go playing around with some high voltage stuff. I did not really follow the actual diagram by John Bedini because of lack of time and resources.
I don't have a motor
I don't have the high voltage end chopped, instead i do it on the primary of the flyback transformer.
I don't have capacitors that last more than 1 second.

But still the result is pretty cool, I can run a little neon bulb on the charge receiving grid.

Rough circuit:
http://australie.dezeserver.nl/simplified circuit.GIF
And the movie:
YouTube - EV gray tube test 1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGq_iJucORY)

Problems:
If I attach a high current source (like a battery) the sparks will be much more powerful, but the mosfet seems to be unable to handle this, even with the heatsink it rapidly heats up.

I still don't understand the Diode that is in the original drawing, I'm talking about the one attached between the high voltage cathode and the battery. It seems to be blocking the high voltage from going to the battery. Can someone please explain?

I still want to add changes and gradually move to the original circuit. I take it step by step.

note: Don't pay attention to my messy and dangerous work environment. I have a very ad hoc way of working. Do not attempt to copy :D

Edit: added another video, cut the ground wire off, neon still burns dimly.... when I touch it it lights up :P
YouTube - EV gray tube test 2 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfeniUuOUHk)

enjoy!

Dingus
05-29-2008, 09:34 PM
I've got a stupid question about cold electricity.

The one think I keep thinking about cold electricity is that it sounds like it means that the electricity doesn't create any heat when passing through a wire. Does it?

Edit: also, could you please put up more detailed instruction on how you made it?

**~Imhotep~**
05-29-2008, 09:55 PM
I've got a stupid question about cold electricity.

The one think I keep thinking about cold electricity is that it sounds like it means that the electricity doesn't create any heat when passing through a wire. Does it?

Edit: also, could you please put up more detailed instruction on how you made it?

no question is stupid only the questions not asked are stupid Dr lindemann has said
i will share my thought
higher voltage and less current = less heat
more current= more heat
i am doing similar experiment with total mechanical osc. circuit works great
you must limit current or you get runaway current
lm317 adj reg on source could be your answer :cheers:
happy experimenting
this is my observation only
hope it helps

Dingus
05-29-2008, 10:20 PM
I know that using regular electricity more current means more heat, but from some of the things i've read, it seems to imply cold electricity doesn't generate heat that it should. thus making it "cold"


Edwin V. Gray - Man Creates Engine That Consumes No Fuel (http://www.waterfuelcarengine.com/edwin-gray-man-creates-engine-that-consumes-no-fuel.html)

"Under normal circumstances, that battery wont last more than 30 minutes. Add to this, the magnets would be ridiculously hot due to the current serge through them. As Gray activated his circuit, he connected the battery to the capacitor network and the voltage reading was steadily increasing till it reached 3 kilovolts, only then he closed the circuit connecting the magnets, a loud pop was heard while the top magnet was flung a couple of feet up an then caught by Hackenberger and strangely it wasnt even near hot! "

**~Imhotep~**
05-29-2008, 11:24 PM
my observations is just as there is a north and south on a magnet (which if you break the magnet in half you will then have two magnets with a north and south you cannot escape that fact on earth) there must be hot and cold electricity ,but i have not been able to prove that so i try to use empirical logic to explain my observations. gray said as tesla that they had observed and used cold electricity until i can prove that to my self i use the fact that high voltage low current =colder circuits my opinion only

Jan H
05-30-2008, 05:23 PM
I've got a stupid question about cold electricity.

The one think I keep thinking about cold electricity is that it sounds like it means that the electricity doesn't create any heat when passing through a wire. Does it?

Edit: also, could you please put up more detailed instruction on how you made it?

made a drawing of the tube as i made it.
http://australie.dezeserver.nl/tube2.GIF

**~Imhotep~**
05-30-2008, 08:48 PM
jan h excellant work ,i am working on many replications at same time and will be posting easy current limiter for power supplies and batteries soon might help not burn up circuits when we experiment , i also had problems with runaway current recently (had to redesign my var. pwr. suppy included more protection and current limits) might save on fets and trasistors etc ,should also work on batteries, will be sharing soon might help :cheers:

Dingus
06-19-2008, 10:01 PM
Have you made any progress with the Gray tube recently?

I've been dying to build one, because I've been thinking of the possibilities of powering my computer with cold electricity. No heat mean no overheating, and no overheating means godly over-clocked computer. :iloveyou:

Aaron
06-19-2008, 10:13 PM
Hi Dingus,

That cold electricity would destroy all the electronics in a computer. The only way is to use it to charge a battery bank or other conversion method then power the supply with normal hot current.

I spoke to John B about this specifically years ago.

Dingus
06-20-2008, 01:42 AM
I barely understand cold electricity works to begin with, but why would cold current destroy electronic components? :( Is there any other way to make it work? Now I can't even think of any other use for it. :(

muttdogg
06-20-2008, 02:27 AM
Dingus,
I am no expert on this subject, Lord knows I'm wracking my brain at the moment, these experiments were originally done when I was kid, Fred Flintstone era. What you need to understand is "cold". Most electronic devices are designed to heat up in order to allow electrons to move freely. The same, which has not been dealt with very often, can be true when electrons are "cold". Sort of like how super-cooled magnets, or circuits behave. When an atom is beyond its normal operating temperature, whether hot or cold the electrons may become free. I know this an extreme subject, and I may not have presented it as well as another, but its been about 40 years since I did this.

Aaron
06-20-2008, 02:49 AM
It would destroy the chips, etc... all those circuits are based on predictable hot current and are designed to utilize that current.

They aren't designed to use disruptively discharged capacitors, etc... or other methods of getting cold electricity effects.

There may be ways to do it but I haven't heard of it.