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View Full Version : Radiant Energy and Cooling?


Ewhaz
09-24-2007, 07:20 AM
I may not post much, but I do browse the forums quite a bit. I thank you all for all the great info you've posted, it does a lot to clear up the issues of radiant energy and how to use it. I've watched Peter's Electro Motor secrets DVD, and I have recently finished reading Beardens Free energy generation, circuits and schematics. I haven't had a chance to play with the knowledge I've gained just yet, as the financial investment is slow going.

However, I've read a few things on the forums about efficient heating and the like. In Beardens book, they mention the cooling property that Negative energy creates. I live in Arizona, so heating isn't the real issue hear (though it can get to freezing at times during the winter) however the summers are much more of a problem.

From the information I've read, negative resistors gather more negative energy, they also begin to cool due to the negtropic properties of negative energy. No one has posted anything on this as of yet, and I was wondering if any one has any additional information on how one might go about creating something that could cool quite efficiently.

This could also have possibilities in cooling refrigerators, and since the systems can be run off 12V or 24V systems, they could also be portable for things like coolers for travel, automotive etc. Think of the possibilities in third world countries where food preparation, cooling things like hospitals and schools, this information is just as important as the rest. Not every one can build a cob house, or make the investment for insulations etc.

My basic understanding is that more negative energy could be produced from any resistance in the circuit. When I get my circuit finally built, I'm going to try putting it through a heating element and see what happens. Has any one done any experiments or have any additional information on the cooling properties of Radiant energy?

Ewhaz
09-24-2007, 07:22 AM
I also just had the thought, if you can generate differences in temperature between hot and cold, you can also run a heat pump to do work as well.

amigo
09-25-2007, 12:20 AM
The more we all post more discussion we create and more ideas and knowledge is passed around, so don't be shy from posting :)

Interesting notions about the heating/cooling, I for one would love to have some portable ways of cooling that do not generate too much noise, perhaps using solid-state circuits.

I wonder if any experimentation is worth with a Peltier element. I probably have one lying around, though seeing that it's a semiconductor I fear that RE might "eat it for breakfast" :)

Shamus
09-25-2007, 12:30 AM
I've seen this statement repeated quite a bit in the FEG book as well, although from what I understand in reading the P&C book that the cooling (and antigravity!) effects don't really manifest until you have a system with a COP of around 10^6 or so. :p YMMV.

amigo
09-25-2007, 01:05 AM
I've seen this statement repeated quite a bit in the FEG book as well, although from what I understand in reading the P&C book that the cooling (and antigravity!) effects don't really manifest until you have a system with a COP of around 10^6 or so. :p YMMV.

I'm not sure why would we need 10^6 COP to achieve anti-gravity. I've started reading William Lyne's book "Pentagon Aliens" and in it he claims that the gravity could be easily overcome, and indeed has been for some time now using electro-gravitic systems based on Tesla's inventions.

Of course if only we had access to those original Tesla papers they hid from us... :D

Ewhaz
09-25-2007, 08:24 AM
What I hope to do is build hand held RE devices when I get to playing with the technology a bit. I've always had a good imagination and I have several ideas I want to play with, the cooling being one of them.

The negative resistors are created in anything with resistance. With that being said, the highest resistance can be found in heating elements because they basically turn everything into radiant heat (not to be confused with RE). Since we are not dealing with current in this case, at the very least I think it will result in a greater amount of RE getting into the circuit.

I remember somewhere it was mentioned that Tesla was able to heat and cool with the same circuit, after some one had argued that you cannot heat and cool at the same time.

In Arizona, we all are painfully aware of how much of a power hog AC units are. Comfort comes at a price and with prices going up it just makes sense that creating economical cooling will go a long way. If that cooling also produces energy instead of consuming it.. Hell might even be able to afford to freeze over.:rofl:

Aaron
09-26-2007, 08:24 PM
A customer of mine from my old health food store invented a process he received on for "radiant" cooling. Of course cooling isn't radiant it is the opposite, but the concept is using the city water supply in a bldg somehow routed to pump through some way in the floors and walls. When it is hot, simply turn on the water through those areas and it should be about 55F (ground temp) of the city water and the warmth in the room or area will be drawn towards the cool water moving through walls and floors. Also, the water isn't really being used up. Or, it can be turned on an whenever water is used, that water will circulate accordingly pulling some heat away with it. Brilliant and simple and something so easy can be done now.

Just learned about city water supply temperature used also for heating and cooling in large industrial size. Will post links about it if I can get it. 100,000 square foot bldg costs about $100/month to heat or cool by this method.

Ewhaz
09-26-2007, 08:49 PM
That is a great idea, it follows along with Geo thermal heat exchange which is a great way to heat and cool the home as the ground is a constant temperature underground. The idea is a good one, but also cost prohibitive. A friend of mine knows a lot about houses and how to mitigate the temperature changes. It Requires walls at least 18 inches thick from what research he has done. Digging a large hole in the ground and building your house there and filling in around it would be the ideal way to keep a house cool, but comes with its own problems, like drainage.

I'd still like to know if any one has any idea how the cooling effect works with Negtropic energy, and if no one does then I will have to experiment myself.

Aaron
09-26-2007, 10:43 PM
Positive energy is dissipative when it encounters resistance...there is friction/heat, etc... and it moves outwards.

Negative energy is convergent when it encounters resistance...meaning at points of resistance the negative energy is amplified and is drawn to points of resistance conceptually. It is time reversed and the action of the drawing and collective of this is the opposite of healing, which would be cooling. So any points that are actually taking advantage of this is using negative energy to cool. This is where extra energy from vacuum space can come from in a circuit that outputs more than the operator inputs.

As far as practical applications of using negative energy for cooling, I think it would have to be a very sophisticated circuit. I've only pulsed caps on the neg to dead batts and even put a resistor in line to slam the neg component into a resistor. For a fact, I was able to charge the batts higher than pulsing on the positive. Also, and this is very subjective of course, but that resistor seemed cooler than the rest of the circuit.

cffevans
10-17-2007, 03:23 AM
I remember somewhere it was mentioned that Tesla was able to heat and cool with the same circuit, after some one had argued that you cannot heat and cool at the same time.

In Arizona, we all are painfully aware of how much of a power hog AC units are. Comfort comes at a price and with prices going up it just makes sense that creating economical cooling will go a long way. If that cooling also produces energy instead of consuming it.. Hell might even be able to afford to freeze over.:rofl:[/QUOTE]

Howdee,
I'm in the HVAC industry. I think you're barking up the wrong tree with the negative energy search for cooling. Ideally, A/C should be able to transfer 7Xs the heat out of your living space to that which is consumed by the condensing unit. The problem is you are trying to dump the heat into a heat saturated environment, which is why the ground source heat pumps work so much better. And normal A/C units can't keep up in the summer; more heat to move; less cool air to move it to; electric companies dropping the voltage trying to make it stretch.

I believe you would find an easier improvement to your efficiency by building one of Peter's super motors and hooking it to a belt drive compressor. Unless your negative energy is absorbing tremendous quantities of heat it will be wisked away by the warm breezes of Arizona and you'll be left holding a damp wire.

But, hey, I could very easily be wrong. So, don't let me discourage you. My knowledge about negative energy is nearly in the negative.

Live clean and prosper,
Mark Evans

Ewhaz
10-17-2007, 06:50 AM
Thats the thing about negative energy. The cooling itself isn't an effect of transferring energy from one place to another, but rather of simply cooling because the state of the environment is being changed. If we think in terms of energy transfer, we might say that the process of negtropic energy changes the environment in some way that requires energy to restore to a balanced system. Thus since we are drawing energy from the environment, the environment then needs to pull energy in the form of heat to restore itself to equilibrium. We are effectively moving the heat by turning it into excess electricity.

When I was working for sears, they had announced a new kind of refrigerator that worked on the idea of changing states of matter. They used an metal plate as the cooling. They would magnetize it, and then when the field was shut off, the atoms would want to jump back to their previous orientation. This switch from one orientation to another would require that the plate draw energy from the environment to return to its desired state. So there is more than one way to cool something definitely.

Those ideas are good ones too, I'll have to fall back on that if I don't figure out how to get the cooling to work to my advantage. :)