PDA

View Full Version : Pulstar Pulse Plug


Aaron
09-03-2007, 05:09 AM
Pulse Plugs - 20,000X More Powerful Than Spark Plugs. Greater Horsepower, Fuel Efficiency, Torque. (http://www.pulstarplug.com)

How Pulse Plugs Work – By Releasing Energy Stored From the Ignition System in a Pulse Circuit (http://www.pulstarplug.com/howtheywork.html)

How They Work

For 100 years, ignition technology has been dominated by spark plugs (see history of spark plugs (http://www.pulstarplug.com/sparkplughistory.html)). Pulse plugs are a radical departure from spark plugs. Their physical dimensions are the same as spark plugs because they have to interface with the engine and ignition system just like spark plugs. But this is where the similarity ends.
http://www.pulstarplug.com/images/pulse_plug.gif http://www.pulstarplug.com/images/cutaway.gif
Pulse plugs incorporate a pulse circuit, which stores incoming electrical energy from the ignition system and releases the stored energy in a powerful pulse of power. Instead of 50 watts of peak power typical of all spark plugs, pulse plugs deliver up to 1 million watts of peak power. So where does the pulse plug get its incredible power?

When the ignition signal is sent to a traditional spark plug, it begins to ionize the spark gap. This means that the voltage builds in the gap until a spark can be formed. During this ionization phase, which lasts about 5 millionths of a second, the incoming voltage (which has nowhere to go) heats up ignition components including the spark plug. This is wasted energy. When the ignition voltage overcomes the resistance in the spark gap, the spark is created with an initial discharge of approximately 50 watts. Once created, the spark resides between the electrodes at very low power for over a period of 30 millionths of a second.
What is different about a pulse plug is that instead of heating ignition parts during the ionization phase, this energy is stored in the integral circuit inside the pulse plug. When the ignition power overcomes the resistance in the spark gap, the pulse circuit discharges all of its accumulated power - 1 million watts - in 2 billionths of a second!
A simple way to think about pulse plugs is that they are similar to a camera flash, whereas spark plugs are more like a flashlight. A camera flash is exponentially brighter than a flashlight even though they both may use the same battery.
Tests at an independent laboratory demonstrate how Pulstar™ pulse plugs burn fuel more efficiently than spark plugs. In this high-speed video (shot at 68,000 frames per second), you can actually see the ignition plume of Pulstar™ growing at more than twice the speed of the spark plug. Pulstar™ generates a much larger spark than spark plugs, which reduces overall burn time and burns the fuel more completely. Once created, the spark dissipates over a period of 30 millionths of a second.

With increased cylinder pressure, the pistons are pushed down with more force, which, in turn, generates more torque in the crankshaft, more liveliness to the throttle and more power to the wheels.
Of course, if you don't use this torque to go faster, the engine does its work with less effort resulting in better fuel economy.
Another way that Pulstar™ improves efficiency is by reducing cycle-to-cycle variation. Cycle-to-cycle variation occurs in every engine to some degree and is caused by the dynamics of combustion, load, fuel quality, mixture of air to fuel and many other combustion variables. These variables can cause the spark plug to generate a weak spark and in the worst case, a misfire. This variability in ignition timing robs all spark ignited, internal combustion engines of up to 10% of their efficiency.
The powerful spark of Pulstar™ ignites fuel more precisely, which can reduce cycle-to-cycle variation by up to 50%. This is an important contribution to improving fuel economy.
N. St.Hill, P. Asadamongkon and K.C. Lee
Experimental and Computational Laboratory
for the Analysis of Turbulence
Mechanical Engineering Department
King’s College London
Strand, London WC2R 2LS, U.K.

adam ant
09-03-2007, 01:52 PM
did you see the price tag? $25 each. they used to say the slit fires where the best because of the split alternated electrode surface area. but they didnt say that after a 1,000 miles that gap would become filled with sludge and it performed worse than a regular plug.

with such small components, i wonder how they would stand against rough driving, bouncing, the occasional hard hit on a pot hole, cold/heat expansion and contraction, premature electrode wear? .

i didnt have time to read the article, maybe this is already addressed there.

Aaron
09-03-2007, 06:21 PM
I think they say the plugs are expected to last as long as normal plugs.

I don't get any carbon buildup in my engine and my oil stays clean for almost a year. Whatever plugs I use will last a very long time.

$25/plug for now. They did get quite an investment from some group so when moving more into the marketplace, I expect they could come to under $10 each in the next 1 year or so or more. Just need the volume.

Jetijs
02-12-2008, 12:55 PM
Hi all.
I bought the pulstar sparkplugs for my toyota yaris. They arrived today and I decided to test them out on a waterjet engine so that I can compare the spark from pulstar plug to an ordinary spark plug. So far I have not seen any visible difference in the spark appearence. I mean, shouln't the pulstar spark be brighter and more powerfull? Here's some pictures:

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-203-motor_stuff_001__1_.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-204-motor_stuff_002__1_.jpg

That on the left is the pulstar spark plug and on the right is an ordinary spark plug. Do you see any difference? I tested this out on an ordinary waterjet ignition system and also on an MSD system. On the MSD system both sparks were brighter, but the brightness of both sparks seemed similar. I could not tell any difference. I already emailed the seller about this and if it should be so.
So far it does not seem to be a smart investment :(
I wont install these sparkplugs in my car till the end of this week, before my magnet fuel saver test is going on now and so far the ceramic magnets seem to work great :)
I will keep you updated.

Edit:
I looked closely on the pulstar plugs schematic. I know that they are not showing everything that is inside that plug, but for what I can see, it looks very much like a small Tesla coil. We have our primary coil (red one) around the secondary coil (the green one) that is wound on a ferrite core. Based of what I know about electric discharges in engine from various sources, their claims could be true.

Jetijs
02-12-2008, 02:19 PM
I received an answer from the pulstar plug engineers:
At less than 5Kv (1 atm of pressure) both sparks are going to be similar to the
naked eye. But IC engines work under pressure and that is where you need to make the
comparison and is what you see on our brochures and website.

Power when you need it
I guess I will have to test it on my car to see any benefits :)

Karl_Palsness
02-12-2008, 03:59 PM
Don’t feel bad. I purchased a set of these plugs also…about 2 months ago. I did the same thing you did and expected to see a BIG difference. I only purchased 2 thank goodness. I wanted to see how it worked and take one apart and do tests on the other. I then was going to buy 5 more for my car but from what I see…it is all Photo shop. They might be using some sort of light filter on the pictures. I even tried to increase the voltage over a normal system buy using a coil I have made for other tests…with no difference.

Karl

Redmeanie
02-12-2008, 04:03 PM
I don't see what effect a high pressure environment could have on the spark ....:confused: Especially if its just ambient air.....
But it would be real easy to test their claims if you build a small vacuum/pressure chamber. And you definetly have the mechanical ability!
:cheers:

Aaron
02-12-2008, 04:52 PM
Karl and Jetijs,

How much did you both pay? Are they still in the $25 range each?

Have either of you tried to make a Firestorm Plug like Robert Krupas?
You definitely have the skills to do it.

Jetijs
02-12-2008, 07:34 PM
Aaron, I paid about 100$ for 4 spark plugs + 37$ shipping. That is much! I wont build any pressure chambers or anything like that, instead I will test if and how much the torque and fuel economy I can get using those spark plugs in a small 1KW diesel generator. This will be much easier.
Aaron, who is Robert Krupas? Any links?
Karl, did you make any other tests than only a visual spark comparison?
Thanks,
Jetijs

Aaron
02-12-2008, 07:37 PM
Hi Jetijs,

http://www.energeticforum.com/renewable-energy/1169-robert-kurpas-firestorm-plugs.html

Yes, even Smokey Yunick (spelling??) confirmed it when he was alive.

Jetijs
02-13-2008, 12:06 AM
Ok, I guess I could make a pressure chamber form plexiglass. I do not have access to nitrogen gas, but I do have some argon gas tanks. I think that the main purpose for an inert gas in certain pressure in those pressure tanks, is because the gas allows the spark plugs to ionize the surrounding space better and thus make the spark brighter. I can test this with argon and see what the difference is. If there wont be any visual difference, I will make some tests with the diesel generator. If this also wont provide any positive results, then we can clearly say, that those pulstar plugs are worth nothing and there is no point in spending money on them.
Thanks.

Karl_Palsness
02-13-2008, 03:24 AM
I thought about machining a pressure chamber but my thoughts are that the pressure in an engine gets over 1000 PSI during the combustion process. I think that the air is only about 150 PSI before the fuel is burned/combusted. Air is a dielectric and the higher the pressure the smaller the spark! At least that is what I was told in university. That is why we use vacuum to increase the spark in a gap. In a vacuum tube, electron flows easily as there is no gas to inhibit the flow. In my aircraft we pressurize the magnetos, if we did not when flying at high altitude the magnetos would ark internally causing catastrophic failure. My final thought on the pressure is this…high compression engines use higher voltage and closer spark gaps to overcome the gas dielectric.

I did not notice any difference in the color of the spark…or type of spark. So I don’t think that this spark plug was anything special. I truly was disappointed in what I saw…as it did not look like it was the X amount that they promised in the brochure. I did not feel that making a pressure chamber at that time was worth it… Jetijs let me know if you are going to machine a chamber…I don’t have the tap to thread one.

I just thought of a simple test…I have seen spark plug testers in the past.

Autolite Aviation Spark Plug Cleaner and Tester from Aircraft Spruce (http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/sparkPlugCleaner.php)

I even use to own one of these things…lol. But I sold it not that long ago. Most airports have them as you need to test the spark plugs every 100 hrs on an aircraft. The only problem is I don’t live near an airport anymore. I will think about where to find one of these machines.

It would be interesting to see if the spark is better under pressure than an ordinary plug.

I paid 25$ each also and about 30$ shipping.

Karl

Jetijs
02-13-2008, 10:27 AM
Karl,
that spark plug tester seems nice, it's a shame you do not have one anymore :( It would answer our questions. I always thought that the less pressure, the higher the resistance through the spark gap. And the more pressure, the less resistance. I assumed this because what is a spark? A spark is a plasma, that conducts electricity. But this plasma appears only when the atoms between the high voltage source and the ground (spark gap) are ionized so far, that they start to conduct electricity and a spark appears. So, if we have a vacuum in the spark gap, there are no atoms to ionize in order to get the electricity to flow. But if we have a high pressure gas between the electrodes, there is much more atoms there to ionize. I may be wrong, so please someone correct me :notworthy:
Thanks,
Jetijs

Jetijs
02-19-2008, 10:36 PM
Today I got my hands on a 3kW generator. I made a custom fuel measuring glass with marks for every 50 grams of fuel. Then I connected this new fuel tank to the generator. I loaded the generator with a 600w load and measured what time does it take to consume 250ml of fuel. I did this several times to get an average result. Then I replaced the original spark plug with the pulstar pulse plug and made these tests again. Each test was about 15 minutes long and I three tests for each spark plug. Then I calculated the average seconds and the difference percentage. Pulstar spark plug could tahe the load about 2% longer than the original spark plug. This might be due to the fact that the original spark plug is a cheap one and has smaller spark gap spacing thus smaller spark, that may not ignite the gas mixture on some pulses. After all, 2% is about 15 seconds of time. I will make some more tests tomorrow with longer cycles and bigger load on the generator. Also I will try a high quality iridium spark plug from a water jet engine. Then we will see if those pulstar spark plugs really do what they claim, or are they just a scam.

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-215-picture_127.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-216-picture_128.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-217-picture_129.jpg

On the last picture the right spark plug is the original generator spark plug. The other is the pulstar plug.
Thank you,
Jetijs.

Jetijs
02-21-2008, 11:07 PM
Hi all.
I have done some long tests. The pulstar spark plug seems to do some good afterall. At first I tried to load the generator with a 600w load, this mada a difference in economy of 2% in favor to pulstar spark plug. Then I increased the load to 800w and the difference reached 2.8%. Then I loaded the generator with all I had - 1900W. This made a fuel economy of 3.85%.
Then I made a test with an iridium spark plug, this one has an /\ shaped electrode made of iridium. This material deals with heat and burning up better, also the /\ shape makes it difficult for some impurities to stick between the spark gap. This made only 1.3% more economy compared to the standard spark plug. I also tried the standard spark plug and a ceramic magnet array around the fuel line. The magnets gave 1.5% fuel economy. So I figured that magnets + pulstar plugs should give 3.85+1.5=5.35% economy. But this setup gave only a slight improvement compared to pulstar plugs alone - 4.25% economy.
I did some math, if I use these spark plugs on my car, I have to drive at least 15000 kilometers till these spark plugs pays themselves off. Who knows what their condition will be after that. That makes me believe, that this is not a smart investment at all.
I will make some more tests and keep you updated.
Here are some pictures of the iridium spark plug and my generator load:

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-218-picture_131.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-219-picture_133.jpg

Thanks,
Jetijs

deggers
02-21-2008, 11:55 PM
Hi Jetijs,

http://www.energeticforum.com/renewable-energy/1169-robert-kurpas-firestorm-plugs.html

Yes, even Smokey Yunick (spelling??) confirmed it when he was alive.


Aaron, do the Firestorm plugs use a standard ignition coil, or MSD or something fancy.

The plugs themselves look of fairly simple construction.
Thanks!

sykavy
02-22-2008, 03:42 AM
Aaron, do the Firestorm plugs use a standard ignition coil, or MSD or something fancy.

The plugs themselves look of fairly simple construction.
Thanks!

Can we even buy Firestorm? I did asearch and can't find anyone who makes or sells them:suprise:

Aaron
02-22-2008, 04:16 AM
To my understanding, the Firestorm need an enhanced ignition. I don't know if that means a higher voltage coil, capacitive discharge like CDI or what.

I think the plugs have no resistor in them.

The original prototypes were made by a jeweler.

Krupa look at used plugs and saw they liked to wear down into a half sphere shape so he thought "why not just make them like that to begin with." So he enlarged the head on the electrode stem and put wire loops on the ground side so equidistant spacing from the mushroom head annode. Therefore they can't misfire like other plugs. If the residual ionization in one area is too high for spark to jump, it simply jumps elsewhere...no misfire.

Krupa is one of the developers of the split fire plug so he didn't come out of nowhere.

I chatted with him a few times online and he is pretty quiet and doesn't say much.

Bosch tested 0% gap growth over their testing on these plugs...basically will never wear out...virtually no emissions from the tailpipe.

14.7:1 is always claimed to be the idea mixture...that is ONLY with a simple spark, but when using plasma bursts, you can release a lot more energy from a lot leaner mixture. 20:1, 40:1 and even just for show and not necessarily practical 100:1 was demonstrated.

I personally think these plugs or duplicates of the concept are what will make water powered engines practical as these plugs split water on contact. Even if people don't have high liters per minute water gas production, these plugs will let an engine run on it...in my opinion.

To think of it, I don't have the engineering skills, tools or experience of a lot of you here, but perhaps a non-fouler can be the base of one...insulate center annode from the non-fouler stick it through and weld on the loops...back side, some connector to stick plug wire too. I don't know if it would be as simple as this but maybe makes it easier than making from scratch?

Jetijs
02-25-2008, 01:39 PM
I made a few tests with ordinary spark plugs and capacitors. Here is a video:
YouTube - spark plug/capacitor test (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11ifKc805gk)
First I show what the arc looks like in an ordinary spark plug at about 5kV AC at 50Hz. Then I just attach a capacitor parallel to the spark plug and you can see how much stronger the arc appears, its just like a primary Tesla coil circuit without the secondary winding. And at last I show how the arcs look like if I use a spark plug with cut away ground electrode. This looks like those firestorm spark plug arcs in that video demonstration Aaron posted. I want to try adding a capacitor in parallel the spark plug on my gas generator to see how the fuel economy changes. Because I heard from many sources that a more powerful spark makes a huge difference. Any comments before I test this? Can i fry the induction coil of my generator this way?
Thanks,
Jetijs.

Aaron
02-25-2008, 09:20 PM
Very cool Jetijs!

It actually reminds me quite a bit like a torquemaster plug.
Extreme Spark.Com (http://www.extremespark.com/)
http://www.extremespark.com/spark20plug2.jpg

Here is the old firestorm page that has been taken off line, found it in archive.org

http://web.archive.org/web/20051217132704/http://www.robertstanley.biz/firestorm.htm
http://web.archive.org/web/20051216094051/http://www.robertstanley.biz/images/lp.gif

Racer426
03-08-2008, 08:22 PM
Hi All,

The original TorqueMaster plugs had NO ground electrode. I talked to the Originator some 20 years ago. He started with a Bosch Super Plug. Cut off the ground electrode and then Rolled the base of the threads in (closest to the ground electrode) to lessen the gap between the ceramic insulator and the base. This also formed a nice, round surface for the spark to jump to. By pulling the metal closer to the insulator, it helped to create a "field effect" that lowered the voltage requirement to jump the gap. He still recommended a stronger coil or, better yet, an MSD Ignition.

I've still got a used set that I took out of one of the cars I sold.

IN MY OPINION, one of the 2 biggest SCAMS for better engine performance and mileage are SPARK PLUGS.

The kind of spark you get is determined by the ignition system, NOT the damn spark plug. A SPARK - IS A SPARK - IS A SPARK. The type of gap that it is jumping makes NO difference. If you want to change the Spark, you have to change the Ignition System. The electronics that fire the Coil. A higher capacity coil gives you just that, higher capacity, not a different spark.

Most PROOF is not really an improvement, but LESS misfires!!!!!!!!!!
That's why it is hard to beat a NEW, Stock ignition system. Very Few Misfires!!!

Smaller center electrodes may give fewer misfires. Multi electrode plugs just give you MORE wear surface to work on. The spark prefers to jump from a SHARP edge, not a rounded edge. That's why the voltage requirement goes up as the plug wears (gap increase and rounded electrodes). You can pull used plugs out and regap them, put them back in, but the voltage requirement is still higher than a new, sharp plug.

That's why I disagree partially with the firestorm plug. Part of the benefit, if any, will be the higher voltage required to jump the spark, and the multi wear surfaces.

The Pulstar spark plug MAY have something in it that changes the spark, but it can't be much, if it's contained in the plug itself. And at that price, the payback is WAY out there.

Many years back I saw a device that you put in between the spark plug and the wire. All it was was a LARGER spark gap BEFORE the Spark Plug gap. In theory it should have worked, but you are putting a higher load on components that weren't designed for it.

I think you would be better off with a MSD type ignition. That WILL change the spark. But the main benefit is still LESS MISFIRES!!!

I got in an argument with a customer that said the Slit Fire Plugs (modified Autolites) increased his power and fuel economy. I ended the argument when I asked him if HE had forgotten that the reason he put the SF plugs in was because he NEEDED a TUNE UP!!!

VERY FEW people are comparing NEW plugs against each other.

Hope this helps,

Speedy Lee :)

Racer426
03-09-2008, 02:35 AM
I've seen the video of the Firestorm Plug that Aaron just posted several times before, and every time I've seen it, my brain went "TILT". Somethings wrong here.

Well, I think I figured it out. WHY are the spark plugs recessed down in the plate? In a real cylinder head, the ground and center electrodes are out in the open, exposed to the fuel in the combustion chamber, NOT recessed. (Looks more like an anti-fouler).

When you watch the video, the Firestorm plug looks like it is actually sparking to the Plate, NOT the electrodes. Maybe it's just a reflection. But it still doesn't explain WHY the plugs are recessed? They're not that way in a real engine.

Speedy Lee :)

rosco1
05-12-2008, 05:03 AM
Karl,
that spark plug tester seems nice, it's a shame you do not have one anymore :( It would answer our questions. I always thought that the less pressure, the higher the resistance through the spark gap. And the more pressure, the less resistance. I assumed this because what is a spark? A spark is a plasma, that conducts electricity. But this plasma appears only when the atoms between the high voltage source and the ground (spark gap) are ionized so far, that they start to conduct electricity and a spark appears. So, if we have a vacuum in the spark gap, there are no atoms to ionize in order to get the electricity to flow. But if we have a high pressure gas between the electrodes, there is much more atoms there to ionize. I may be wrong, so please someone correct me :notworthy:
Thanks,
Jetijs


I purchased a spark plug tester late last week, it has a pressure bell attached to it, so when it arrives, maybe at the end of this week, I'll run some tests for you.

I won't be using the pulse plug though, due to it's single earth strap design. The reason I'm steering away from these types of plugs is because they need to be "indexed" to realise their full potential, and "shielding" of the flame kernel by the earth strap is an often overlooked issue, as is the swirl direction of the fuel/air mass inside the cylinder.

By not indexing these, you could be pointing the open area of the plug in the wrong direction inside the cylinder, which will yield a gain somewhat less than desired. Also, by having a "staggered" array of plugs, some pointing this way, some that way, you will never realise the full potential of the plug. Any gains would be offset by the losses due to this point alone.

My tests will only be done on multiple ground plugs, as this is where the gains are hidden. Someone said earlier that a spark is a spark, is a spark, that's sort of true, yet no account was given for what that spark can grow to become, once given a better earthing point. A standard "J" gap spark plug is less efficient simply by virtue of it's design.

Multiple earths are the way forward, they allow a flame kernel an unrestricted "view" of the main fuel/air mass inside the cylinder. The don't require indexing, as there is no "J" gap to get in the way.

The test plug you made is what I'm talking about. That worked far better than a "J" gap ever could.

By providing the fuel/air mass with multiple points of ignition, you will get a faster and more efficient burn, thus make more power, and producing less emissions.

The plug I feel may be a reasonable contender at this time, is the Brisk LGS.

Until Mr Krupa gets his "Firestorm" on the market, the Brisk may have to do. I'll test a few other plugs as well, and try to determine which is the best on offer at this time.

I've modified a couple of old NGK plugs, along the lines of the "firestorm", and from what I witnessed in open air testing, they definitely do work. That is why I purchased the pressure bell, so I could pressurise them and record the gains.

I used a standard HEI ignition system for my open air tests. I don't intend to upgrade to any other system. The basis for my tests, is to lift the efficiency of a standard engine from the approximate 70-75%(debatable) efficiency, to perhaps 80-85%, hopefully with plugs alone.

My tests will also include the use of other spark enhancing devices, including an ICAT, a Lectran Pulsar, and a home made "intensifier", which is simply an introduced air gap, loosely based on a Meissner principal.

I also see there is a product in Malaysia called the "Stromberg", which purports to do what these other devices do. I may try to secure one of those as well.

Jetijs
09-04-2008, 12:43 PM
I had a hard time with these pulstar plugs. When I installed them on my toyota yaris at first everything seemed ok, I did not notice any difference at all neither in torque nor in fuel economy. In fact the car gradually became weaker and started to consume more fuel. I did not know yet what the reason for this was. I tried everything - changing all the oils and filters that I could, I took the car for diagnostics and they said, that the car computer has no error logs at all and everything works fine. Everything became worse and worse till some days ago the car started to shake when idling, I took the car to service and they said, that one of the cylinders isn't working. So I removed the pulstar plugs. One of them was dead and did not work, aslo the electrodes were black. When I replaced all the pulstar plugs with regular spark plugs, the shaking disappeared, motor torque came back and the fuel consumption became lower. I have never seen an ordinary spark plug die in such a way.
So do not waste your money for the pulstar plugs, it is not worth it.
Thanks,
Jetijs

dubsta
09-04-2008, 03:45 PM
these pulstars are known to be fragile and break a little to easily actually, most likely thats what happened to one plug that was completely dead i your car.

The plug wasnt firing at all so you were effectively running on 3 cylinders probably with a loppy idle and misfiring.

Ozicell
09-04-2008, 04:29 PM
these pulstars are known to be fragile and break a little to easily actually, most likely thats what happened to one plug that was completely dead i your car.

The plug wasnt firing at all so you were effectively running on 3 cylinders probably with a loppy idle and misfiring.


Hi Guys,

I am sure that you all have looked at my firestorm reps which I call Ball spark plug!!! I have a set of Pulstar plugs and have shown that in open air they produce a more energetic spark! Having said that, they are still nowhere near as powerful as we need! AND as Dubsta has said they ARE FRAGILE!!
So check these vids I did and you'll see what I mean!

FireStorm replication :-

YouTube - Ball Spark Plug Test (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zh-pHmGhCIw)

Firestorm replication under pressure:-

YouTube - Ball Spark Plug going wild under higher pressure (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hl9zXE7ntRQ)

Pulstar plug versus standard resistorless plug:-

YouTube - Pulstar spark V Standard resistorless spark (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYh_qiMKZ3k)

I am looking into a Firestorm - Ball plug/Pulstar hybrid running on a Kiker/Nology hotwires hybrid lead, powered by a water spark plug circuit. I haven't got there yet but I will post as developments as they occur. :peacesmiley:

Cheers
Jeff

Ozicell
09-04-2008, 04:37 PM
I had a hard time with these pulstar plugs. When I installed them on my toyota yaris at first everything seemed ok, I did not notice any difference at all neither in torque nor in fuel economy. In fact the car gradually became weaker and started to consume more fuel. I did not know yet what the reason for this was. I tried everything - changing all the oils and filters that I could, I took the car for diagnostics and they said, that the car computer has no error logs at all and everything works fine. Everything became worse and worse till some days ago the car started to shake when idling, I took the car to service and they said, that one of the cylinders isn't working. So I removed the pulstar plugs. One of them was dead and did not work, aslo the electrodes were black. When I replaced all the pulstar plugs with regular spark plugs, the shaking disappeared, motor torque came back and the fuel consumption became lower. I have never seen an ordinary spark plug die in such a way.
So do not waste your money for the pulstar plugs, it is not worth it.
Thanks,
Jetijs

Hi Jetijis,

I also broke a plug and mine was replaced free of charge, however, I do agree, they BREAK far too easily for me too. Still they are a piece of the puzzle and are worth looking at for research! Running a car on them though.......... !!! Time will tell.

Have you tried getting your plug replaced under warranty?

Cheers
Jeff

Jetijs
09-04-2008, 04:43 PM
Jeff,
I do not want to play the Russian roulette with these plugs anymore. Thank you for your video, it definitely shows, that the pulstar plugs actually give some improvement. But your plugs had their ground electrode removed, I did my tests with non modified plugs and in this case I could not see any difference in spark strength compared to a standard plug. I am still convinced that it is not worth buying them, at least at the current price, if they break so easily, they will never pay off. I will try take the dead plug apart and see whats inside :)
Thanks,
Jetijs

Ozicell
09-04-2008, 04:51 PM
I've seen the video of the Firestorm Plug that Aaron just posted several times before, and every time I've seen it, my brain went "TILT". Somethings wrong here.

Well, I think I figured it out. WHY are the spark plugs recessed down in the plate? In a real cylinder head, the ground and center electrodes are out in the open, exposed to the fuel in the combustion chamber, NOT recessed. (Looks more like an anti-fouler).

When you watch the video, the Firestorm plug looks like it is actually sparking to the Plate, NOT the electrodes. Maybe it's just a reflection. But it still doesn't explain WHY the plugs are recessed? They're not that way in a real engine.

Speedy Lee :)

G'day Speedy,

All I can say is that these plugs DEFINITELY react in a different way to a normal plug! I have afew variations and only where the ball electrode is involved do I see the plug come out of the motor clean! It appears to be blued but I can wipe a white cloth over it and it's clean! Every other type of plug is either sooted or browned off in some way and not clean!

Anyway, that's my own experience with them! BTW, that's on a points system - no HEI or CDI!

Cheers
Jeff

Ozicell
09-04-2008, 04:59 PM
Jeff,
I do not want to play the Russian roulette with these plugs anymore. Thank you for your video, it definitely shows, that the pulstar plugs actually give some improvement. But your plugs had their ground electrode removed, I did my tests with non modified plugs and in this case I could not see any difference in spark strength compared to a standard plug. I am still convinced that it is not worth buying them, at least at the current price, if they break so easily, they will never pay off. I will try take the dead plug apart and see whats inside :)
Thanks,
Jetijs

I also have taken them out of my car as they didn't give enough improvement by themselves to warrant the price or what I am trying to achieve but will still use them for research as they do seem to produce a better spark - at least my testing shows me this! I feel that eventually I will be settling for standard resistorless/Ball type plugs with upgraded leads and circuitry.

At my end, the jury is still out!

Cheers
Jeff

Jetijs
09-04-2008, 05:55 PM
Ok, so I took one of them apart to see what is inside. Here you have some pictures:

http://www.pulstarplug.com/images/cutaway.gif

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-549-plug.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-544-plug_001.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-545-plug_002.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-546-plug_003.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-547-plug_004.jpg

http://www.emuprim.lv/bildez/thumbs/lrg-548-plug_007.jpg

You can see that there are no coils in the spark plug, but the metal rod inside the spark plug is unusual shaped and all the metal parts are connected together via a pressed powder layers. Usually all the sparkplugs have a simple metal rod inside that connects the positive side to the resistor, but this one is unusual shaped. I think that this shape does increase the surface area of the plug thus increasing the capacitance by some picofarads, also there is this metal ring on the outside of the ceramic housing and I have not see such a thing on other spark plugs (I have disassembled quite a few). I believe that such an arrangement works just as a capacitor in parallel of the spark plug. And we can see what happens if a capacitor is connected in parallel of the plug in these videos:
YouTube - spark plug/capacitor test (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11ifKc805gk)
YouTube - HV AC test (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urpxyefdfFM)

Ozicell, can you do an experiment? Take a high voltage capacitor with a capacity of some hundred picofarads and attach it in parallel of your spark plug. The voltage rating of the cap should be in the kV range. Maybe even put some of such caps in series so that the HV arc can not jump across the cap leads. See what it does, it should improve the spark.

Aaron
09-04-2008, 06:58 PM
The Pulstar plug is an attempt to put the Direct Hits technology inside the plug. Both are from the same people.

It is simply "peaking capacitor" technology and works with a capacitor a few hundred picofarads of whatever voltage is equal or greater than the gap breakdown voltage. It helps get a more robust spark but is not the same effect as the diode/cap method. With enough pf's in the cap, the effect does grow but gets to the point that they can't charge fast enough...that is why they limit it to a few hundred pf's.

vzon17
09-05-2008, 11:55 PM
I found some nice capacitors fo real cheap, 35,000 volts

.003uF 35,000 Volt Capacitor-The Electronic Goldmine (http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G16864)


v

Lemontree
09-06-2008, 10:13 PM
some guy told me that some enthusiasts sometimes used spark plugs from aviation motors, like plane "kukuruznik" and so on. so, the better spark can make some diference in burning effectiveness.