Energetic Forum  
Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Delicious Digg Reddit WordPress StumbleUpon Tumblr Translate Addthis Aaron Murakami YouTube 2020 ENERGY CONFERENCE - PRE-REGISTER NOW!!!!

2020 Energy Science & Technology Conference
PRE-REGISTER NOW!!!
http://energyscienceconference.com


Go Back   Energetic Forum > > >
   

Agriculture Organic farming, remineralization, rock dust, biochar, soil micro organisms and other discussion relating to soil, water and food.

* NEW * BEDINI RPX BOOK & DVD SET: BEDINI RPX

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-16-2009, 04:06 AM
sucahyo's Avatar
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3,073
Shading baby plant

In here growing baby plant in shade is common practice to produce healthy plant. I just wondering if it's the same as everywhere else?

Do the site bellow, forbid it?
Wheat and Peas Seperated to Avoid Shading | BioEnergy Lists: Biochar (Terra Preta)


Victor Schauberger mention a healthier plant living in shade although it grow slower:
Coats & Schauberger - Living Energies - Viktor Schaubergers Brilliant Work With Natural Energy Explained, page 240

Quote:
The true interpretation of the spacing of the annual rings is quite the opposite where the spacing is larger the tree had greater difficulty in growing and where smaller the growth was healthy.

This crucial factor, neglected in all contemporary forestry, is best explained by demonstrating the difference between natural and light-induced growth in shade-demanding timbers. The photograph from Viktor Schauberger's book, Our Senseless Toil (fig. 17.10), compares the girths of a plantation tree and two naturally grown trees. As can be seen, the separation between the annual rings in the light-induced growth is far larger than in the naturally grown timbers, in which these are barely perceptible. All three trees are roughly the same age, but substantially different in quality.

Because the initial growth of the naturally grown trees took place in very diffuse light under the protection of the mother-tree and in the proper soil conditions, the annual rings are very close together, the sap-ducts are virtually straight and the timber has what might be termed a 'resonant' quality. Incidentally this extremely fine-grained timber is the sort of timber that Stradivari used to make his famous violins. The actual timber that he used was mulberry wood that had fallen into streams in the southern Italian Alps.

The effect of excess light and heat on the growth of a shade-demander is schematically depicted in fig. 17.11. The annual rings on the sunny side of the trunk are very widely spaced, whereas on the shaded side they are very close. Because the metabolic processes taking place in the shaded area have not been disturbed, the wood has not been forced to expand with heat. On the left-hand, shadow side, the diurnal temperature fluctuation is relatively small and on the right-hand, sunlit side, is much larger due to the exposure to light and heat. These large extremes of temperature are not conducive to the uniform and regular growth found on the left-hand side.

Coats & Schauberger - The fertile earth - Natures energies in agriculture, soil fertilisation and forestry, page 64
Quote:
In contrast to the timber grown rapidly using modern methods, this slow-growing timber exhibits annual rings that can barely be distinguished by the naked eye. Moreover its organic structure displays a truly remarkable uniformity.

Resonant timber (such as hazel, spruce and silver fir) is mainly used in the manufacture of musical instruments. The marvellous tone colour of the instruments made from such wood (Stradivarius fashioned his famous violins with it) is not only indicative of the healthiest and therefore the most natural growth and development, but also of an almost unlimited durability.5 If we now compare the structure of the timber produced by modern forestry with the high-quality timber, now almost legendary in our indigenous forests, then for the first time we become fully conscious of the well-nigh irretrievable loss we have suffered; largely through the failure to appreciate the facts of the matter cited above.
__________________
 
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links

Download SOLAR SECRETS by Peter Lindemann
Free - Get it now: Solar Secrets

  #2  
Old 04-16-2009, 06:47 AM
Aaron's Avatar
Aaron Aaron is offline
Co-Founder & Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Washington State
Posts: 10,999
food growth speed

I think it depends on your goal.

To me, as long as the strain is not genetically modified and I'm using organic nutrients and the food that is produced is more with the sun and that gives more sustenance that is nutrient packed vs. waiting for a more nutrient packed food that takes longer...I'll choose the faster growing one in the sun.

That doesn't mean that I don't want the slower growing one that may be even more dense in nutrients...but how long do you want to wait to eat?

Perhaps the slower growing stuff can be dehydrated and stored while the faster growing stuff is eaten while it is growing.
__________________
Sincerely,
Aaron Murakami

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-16-2009, 01:35 PM
Vortex Vortex is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 899
Some plants grow better when partly shaded, others in no shade and others in total shade. The question is what the plant wants and not what man thinks he should do. I only know what I'm told on that issue. A plant that wants total shade is not going to grow as well in total sun light. Schauberger was documenting that plants require different levels of sun light or shade.
Permaculture works with this idea plants require different levels of sun light.

Off topic, but has to do with tree growth is how what lives in the soil dictates what grows above the soil.
The tree lines on mountains for example shows the relationship between fungus and the underground network of the soil and the trees that are able to grow at different levels on the mountain. Types of trees stop growing as you go up the mountain due to what can live/grow in the soil under the tree.
__________________
Remember to be kind to your mind ...
Tesla quoting Buddha: "Ignorance is the greatest evil in the world."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-17-2009, 03:17 AM
sucahyo's Avatar
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3,073
Agree to both. In here the solution to time vs health is by doing shade treatment only to baby plant. After a couple of weeks this baby plant then transfered to open ground or get the cover lift up. But since the initial investment can be expensive, not everyone do it.

But on plant like red onion, shade treatment will still be kept even until harvest. The main problem of red onion are bug, by covering it with very fine net the hole will still allow air circulation, allow some light to pass trough but will prevent bug to enter / laying egg in the plant. Since the red onion product is not the body/leaves, it will not be a problem if the body/leaves are small. It seems to produce averagely bigger product because it is healthier.

I think for plant that require size, shade would only needed at very early state of grow. While plant that require quality shade can be kept.

BTW, I forgot, does apple taste sour if it is exposed to sun ray?
__________________
 

Last edited by sucahyo; 04-17-2009 at 03:20 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-17-2009, 05:24 AM
Vortex Vortex is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 899
Pest bug control

It's called germ warfare.
Collect 1/2 a cup of insects, especially get the ones that look sluggish or sick
looking. Put them and a couple cups of water in a blender, stain in a coffee filter
and spray that on your plants.
You do not have to spray the bugs, just the plants.
Most anything else you try to use, must be sprayed onto the bug to kill it.

The organic gardener's handbook of natural insect and disease control
__________________
Remember to be kind to your mind ...
Tesla quoting Buddha: "Ignorance is the greatest evil in the world."
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-18-2009, 02:36 AM
sucahyo's Avatar
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3,073
Thanks. I think it is a bit hard to do though. The bug attack at spesific time and usually only once during plant lifetime. One attack is enough to spoil the harvest. And it is not just one type of bug.
__________________
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Please consider supporting Energetic Forum with a voluntary monthly subscription.

Choose your voluntary subscription

For one-time donations, please use the below button.


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v1.4.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Shoutbox provided by vBShout v6.2.8 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
2007-2015 Copyright - Energetic Forum - All Rights Reserved

Bedini RPX Sideband Generator

Tesla Chargers