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Agriculture Organic farming, remineralization, rock dust, biochar, soil micro organisms and other discussion relating to soil, water and food.

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  #1  
Old 11-21-2007, 08:56 PM
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Soil Remineralization

Rock dust seems to be the #1 most effective soil remineralization ingredient.
This link has a lot of resources for this particular concept:
The Survival of Civilization by John Hamaker & Donald Weaver

Also, sea minerals seem to be a runner up to the rock dust concept such as:
SeaAgri

The downfall I see using the sea sourced minerals is that is will too easily wash away if you want to apply it for long term use. The rock dust if applied in amounts of 10 tons per acre at a cost of material (transport not included) is about $8 to $80 for 10 tons and that will stay in the soil for 10-20 years...imagine applying once and not needing to add any fertilizer or anything to the soil for 10-20 years!

EDIT [I find that the sea solids can be applied to soil and is good for at least 5 years]. Much more expensive per ton, but less needed per acreage.

The soil micro organisms are protein based and consume necessary minerals and trace minerals for proper enzyme function. Without these minerals, the soil becomes lifeless and any food grown is very "empty."

Any discussion on these concepts is welcome and appreciated.
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Old 11-21-2007, 11:48 PM
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Rock Dust & Sea Water remineralization resources and information

Rock Dust info:

Welcome to Remineralize the Earth
They have a resource page with a lot of rock dust sources:
Remineralize the Earth

Remineralize Center

Google Search rock dust remineralize - Google Search

Black Gold soil product includes rock dust
The new "Black Gold" is already on sale in Indonesia! | Terra Preta

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sea Minerals info:

SeaAgri
Sea Agri powerpoint presentation:
http://www.msue.msu.edu/objects/cont...riculture.pdf/


How to Improve Topsoil
Tsunami
Actually Aided Crops
in Indonesia
by CHRIS BRUMMITT, Associated Press Writer
Sunday, September 25, 2005
MEULABOH, Indonesia—From atop the coconut tree where he fled to escape the onrushing water, Muhammad Yacob watched the tsunami turn his rice paddy into a briny, debris-strewn swamp. Nine months later, Yacob and his wife are harvesting their best-ever crop—despite fears that salt water had poisoned the land.
"The sea water turned out to be a great fertilizer," said Yacob, 66, during a break from scything the green shoots and laying them in bunches on the stubble. "We are looking at yields twice as high as last year."



rest of story: TERRA: Living Soil




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Old 12-07-2007, 10:16 AM
Carbon negative energy Carbon negative energy is offline
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Adding carbon to the mix

Hey Aaron,

Your 100% right about our need to take a serious look at fixing our soil if we're any way serious about resolving climate change and moving forward in a sustainable path.

Rock dust is a very effective way to rebuild the minerals and once the microbes get to work on them they become plant available. I know of one product that mixes organic waste along with dolomite, microbes and charcoal. Charcoal (Biochar if it's used in agriculture) acts like a catalyst as it retains water and nutrients and also provides a safe hebetate for soil microbes. I know biochar is not so easy to apply on a large scale but farmers in the Amazon rebuilt their soils with it thousands of years ago video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2809044795781727003 .

Another good site to visit on all that is biochar is Christoph Steiner's site www.biochar.org and for some clips on the effects and how to make it you can do a search on youtube for "biochar".

Regards,
Rob.
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Old 12-07-2007, 03:52 PM
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**cough** sea salt
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Old 12-09-2007, 01:14 AM
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adam ant--Are you using the De Souza salt on your garden? If so, how much?
I bought the SeaAgri salt earlier this year, but I didn't apply it since there is an exceptional drought in east TN and the salt would just sit on top of the ground and eaten by my chickens. The SeaAgri has a larger grain that I anticipated, so I don't want the chickens to exceed a safe level of salt. If we get a decent snow this winter, I'll apply the salt and let the snow work for me.

Thank you Aaron for starting the Agriculture forum!
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Old 12-09-2007, 06:16 AM
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I saw a show about green products. One of the segments was about an ex pro basketball player who now lives in Wisconson and owns an organic produce farm.

He has found a source where he can get discarded coconut husks from the South Pacific. According to him, coconut husks have a high supply of minerals and nutrients ideal for soil.

Using his own compost material, he mixes 1 part of the husks to 1 part the compost. Then he puts earthworms (he used the small wriggly type) in the mix and lets it sit until the worms have chewed through everything, leaving a nutrient rich soil.

Finally he sifts the worms out and starts the process over.
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Old 12-15-2007, 05:07 AM
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sea salt remineralization

Bryan,

I think you're absolutely right about the sea salt. Since nature already did the work of grinding it down and putting it into the sea, it is already in a perfect form. Also, places that get flooded with sea water seem to always have bumper crops following in the next growing season!

From what I found it is more expensive..you need less per acre so maybe cost per acre is comparable.

Athena,

SeaAgri is the exact product I found...I posted about it elsewhere in this agriculture forum. How much did you buy, how much did it cost, how large of area does it treat and how long (years) is the application supposed to work?
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Old 12-17-2007, 02:05 AM
Athena Athena is offline
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SeaAgri

Aaron,
I paid $24 (including S&H) for a 10-lb bag of SeaAgri just before summer. Yesterday, I scattered 6 or 7 cups across the front yard just as it started to rain. Finally, a decent rain! I have an acre, of which 3/4 of it is "rented" to my 23 chickens in the backyard My garden is only 30' x 100' so I was going to use the application rate suggested on SeaAgri's website:
Quote:
Application Rates for Home & Community Gardens

All Garden Soils
2.5 pounds SEA-90 per 100 square feet year one
1.25 pounds SEA-90 per 100 square feet annually years two and three
No further application for five years
Because of the extreme drought in TN, I didn't use SeaAgri this summer--I haven't used it before, so I was really looking forward to the experiment. Sorry, I can't offer advice. If anybody else has used SeaAgri or a similar product, I'd LOVE to hear about it.

AcresUSA has 2 books that deal with using sea solids fertilizers:
Fertility From the Ocean Deep by Charles Walters;
Sea Energy Agriculture by Maynard Murray, M.D.
(talking to husband here..."hey honey, this is a good Christmas gift idea!")
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Old 12-17-2007, 02:42 AM
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Azomite

This rock dust comes in a granular form as well as a micronized version. When I used this about 8 years ago, it only came in a fine powder that was very messy. This is a good product and I used it for house plants as well.

Peak Minerals - Azomite Inc.
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Old 12-17-2007, 02:56 AM
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Sea Energy Agriculture

Here is a pdf of Sea Energy Agriculture by Robert Cain of SeaAgri.
It isn't a book but more like a power point but gives some good info:
http://www.msue.msu.edu/objects/cont...riculture.pdf/
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Old 02-21-2009, 01:45 AM
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Nice thread here. Currently looking for an easy way to fertilize land for a family.

I think anyone already know this already, just in case someone only read this thread.

I read on ormus reference that sea water can only make land fertil for a short time. It will reduce the land quality if used too many time. It explain that the one that make the land fertil is not the salt contained in the sea water, but other substance. If we can remove the salt from sea water, we can get this substance.

The other subtance is called ormus or white gold. It seems the best way to get it is by processing high density salt water. Since I read it from a rather old book. I think there must be an easier way to get this material instead of repeated drying and titration.

I am thinking of electrolysing the sea water, to separate the NaCl, getting NaOH water and that substance. But anyone warn that Cl2 gas is highly toxic.



For other mineral, anyone ever use the black soil from around an active volcano? Many flourist here (East Java, Indonesia) use it for expensive flower. Kinda like using Mangrove? trees for orchid.
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Old 02-28-2010, 12:19 PM
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I may be preaching to the converted here but here's my 2 cents anyway.
I read a book - Bread from Stone by Dr Julius Hensel several years ago.
He came up with the theory of using rock dust and that the NPK philosophy was flawed in the late 1800's.
I began using rock dust (paramagnetic) about 6 years ago and have never looked back.
My veges are sweet ,healthy and I don't use any sprays at all (not even garlic)
I don't get problems with pests or fungal problems, and my produce keeps very well.
I don't even use any manures or fish products, just rock dust incorperated into compost that is extremely aged. As Schauberger said decaying matter is cancerous matter. My compost is finished decaying and then some- pure humus
Hensel stated plants don't need nitrogen as they get it from the air.Plants grown with added nitrogen are succeptable to pests and disease, and the animals or humans fed them will be substandard specimens of their respective species.
It has worked for me, And I don't need to buy stuff all the time.
I've just recently started experimenting with Himilayan rock salt and celtic sea salt, It seems perfectly logical to me but others seem to think I'll overdose the plants with salt, I'm a bit weird so I tend to listen to results more than doubting thomases.
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Old 02-28-2010, 05:39 PM
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minerals

Hi Higgs,

I've used rock dust in my garden too and some sea agri salt as well. It is
modified to have the optimum pH from what I understand and is a little
different than celtic sea salt or similar even though places flooded with
sea salt water or ocean water have flourished afterwards when everyone
thought it was going to do the opposite.

I have had lettuce in my garden last for 4-5 months literally with zero
spoilage and it is just as crispy after that time as it was just grown. And
this is through the entire hot summer and into fall. As long as the garden
is watered, that stuff just stays naturally preserved in the ground.
I've had some carrots last just as long.

I don't use any bug killers, etc...
because there aren't any bugs. Only the sunflowers had some ear wigs
and they don't even bother the seeds - only the pesky squirrels do that!
The only bug prevention I use is a nano-colloidal organic soap + water mix
I spray on the plants because it is a water wetter but it does keep off
bugs, even though it isn't needed for that.

First post in this thread:
The Survival of Civilization by John Hamaker & Donald Weaver
There is a free pdf of bread from stone for anyone that wants it.

I also use biochar and michorryzal fungus in my soil. Through this winter,
I take the charred wood (not ash) if there is any char in the stove in
the morning and throw it on top of my garden. Soon, I'll simply till it in.
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Old 02-28-2010, 07:21 PM
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I must be coming back into tune. I've skimmed this info on rock dust sometime last year. But last night I was going through all the links and reading all these posts. Then when I woke up it was the first thing on my mind. "Get on the computer and bring this thread back to the top, by asking any question I could think of. LOL" And lo and behold it's already back to the top.

The thoughtless question I was gonna ask was about produce size. From the remineralize the earth site it appears that the produce grows huge.? Have you all been noticing this? I was thinking of experimenting with pyramid shapes to change the produce size, but then began reading about rock dust. I may still try the pyramid thing though. Also if anyone is interested in this question. Is she holding a beet with the greens removed on this site? REMINERALIZE THE EARTH - Home Typically it's the first picture that pops up.

I also recall reading about not needing the use of pesticides and such because no pests will bother the produce. Is this simply from the rock dust in the ground? I thought I recalled reading on the remineralize the earth site something about putting some rock dust in water and spraying it on the produce?

What about trees and pesticides? My grandma sprays her fruit orchard EVERY year with pesticides. I asked her if I could take care of it this year and to cancel the chemical spray visits. She sounds like she's gonna let me. But I was thinking of using compost tea and applying it every two-three weeks. It would be much more convenient to just apply the rock dust and only need to do it once. Has anyone some experience in using rock dust on fruit trees? And did the pests stay away from the trees? Could I just apply it to the ground or should I also make a spray and spray the trees? Should I also use the compost tea if I use the rock dust spray?

How would I apply the rock dust to the fruit orchard? I can't rototill it into the ground because I don't wanna till up all those roots. Or can I? Spray on the ground? Just sprinkle it on the ground?

I also intend to apply the rock dust to the lawn, because that's another thing that's sprayed EVERY year. Sometimes twice a year. Once in the spring and once in the fall. I definately can't rototill the lawn. What would be the best way to apply it to the lawn? Rock dust spray? Or just put a light coating on the lawn?

I know I have TONS of questions. But I wanna get it right the first year so that my grandma says, "WOW", and never wants to use chemicals again.

I'm really anxious and excited to try the rock dust. It'll be the first year I have somewhere to grow a garden.
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Old 02-28-2010, 08:02 PM
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rock dust

Sounds like you're in the flow!

My own produce size was not very big. I'm an amateur in growing and I
had a tendency to plant everything too close together and that can
stunt the growth. However, my lettuce was preserved so long because
it was so bunched up together it slowed the growth so it was like baby
leaves nonstop, which is the best anyway in my opinion. Another thing
for small produce for me was that all seeds were 100% organic and
original heirloom. Most of the ones I picked were for flavor and not size.
There are big size organic varieties but I didn't get those. I think if you
have seeds that are from varieties bred for big size and you use rock
dust, etc... you'll see incredible results.

The rock dust itself is an irritant to some pests. That is part of the
bug prevention. The other is that normally pests attack weak plants and
with proper nutrition, the plants are healthy and thriving so the bugs
have a tendency to stay away. Survival of the fittest.

Some organic nanocolloidal soaps can be sprayed on trees/plants for
bug prevention and is one of the best things if you do need bug
prevention, plus you get the benefit of the water wetting benefit that
makes all the nutrients more absorbable.

If for example 10 tons per acre of rock dust are added, there is no need
to add any minerals for up to 15 years. Or it can be 1 ton per acre and
then add 1 ton per acre every year or every other year or so.

I don't know about orchard applications, but
that remineralize.org has a LOT of tips from people that have dealt with
this for many years. Almost guaranteed you can reach someone that knows.

The soap by the way saves orchards. Trees sprayed with the soap did not
have frost damage to the fruit.

I actually deal with the most advanced soap for this purpose but I won't
recommend dealing with the company because they have no integrity.
If I can work out something with the manufacture directly, I'll post about
it. My friend/partners is looking to getting licensing to manufacture it
locally.

Anyway, I'd really recommend contacting some of the experts at
www.remineralize.org to ask for specific application to orchards.
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Old 03-01-2010, 05:31 AM
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I am sorry that I was away for so long. I had a major unfortunate meltdown and slowly building back up.

bug/pest control is very simple... mint/catnip/marigolds/onions/basil/oregano/
simply use herbs in between and around your garden. they are needed anyways, just utilize their potency towards your advantage.

another remedy is diatom earth. (the safe kind)

also marigolds for bigger pests like rabbits.

Isreal is now using a form of sea salt to replenish their lands. the once dead land is now selling flowers to holland....
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Old 03-01-2010, 05:52 AM
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diatomaceous earth and boric acid

Welcome back Adam Ant, been a while!

I totally forgot about diatomaceous earth. I have a
box of that and I use it together with boric acid powder
that has cockroach pheremones, etc... in it for ants.
Don't need it for my garden but in some places by my sidewalk
and driveway, there are some serious ant problems and
I sprinkle both of them along their trail and all over the holes.

The dirt here is really sand land with lots of termites and ants,
but the diatom earth and boric acid works well for a little while
then they're back. But I prefer having to use that stuff
occasionally instead of spraying chemicals on my property.
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Old 03-02-2010, 10:34 AM
HiggsBoson HiggsBoson is offline
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WantFreeEnergy
You said in your post that you might be in charge of an orchard - good news
If the orchard has been dependent on chemicals for an extended period the soil will more than likely be low in micro-organisms, the kind needed for quality organic growth. It will take some time for them to regenerate but compost teas, particularly Actively Aerated Compost Teas (AACT) will be a fast track getting the soil back in shape, and can also be sprayed on foliage.
Rock dust in fine grades does work quite quickly, but in an established orchard where it can't be tilled in, it may take a while to become fully active.
The action of rock dust is cumulative and can take a few years to become really apparent. So expect to have problems especialy in the first year.
Digging it in prior to planting is usually the best method but not possible in your case.
Fruit trees can handle spot tilling (not with a rototiller) ie digging small patches and adding rock dust and compost around the dripline of the trees, and this is a fast way to get it to the rootzone.The trees actually benefit from spotted holes as they get a burst of new rootgrowth and corresponding foliage and fruit, but if you hit any large roots move a bit and try again.
Spot till and spread the dust on the surface as well.
An excellent book on microrganisms in soil is called Teaming with Microbes and the methods it recommends (AACT) go hand in hand with remineralizing with rock dust as rock dust is perfect microbe food.
If the orchard is a commercial concern and someones livelyhood is dependent on it, maybe a 3 year plan would be more appropriate,add the rockdust, build the soil and taper the sprays off gradually and experiment with organic pest control until you have it figured out.
The orchard is largely dependent on the sprays because of years of decline in the soil and it will take a few years to build the soil back up (and the trees immunity).
Don't expect an easy ride, growing fruit is hard work and if other orchards nearby use sprays the bugs may just choose to eat yours.
I don't want to break your heart but I think 1 year is not long enough to do away with sprays.
Organic growers are a helpfull bunch so try talking to someone who has converted an orchard, Look on the web or even try asking questions at a local farmers market.
All that said I think it is a noble cause to regenerate land and produce something without chemicals.
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Old 03-03-2010, 02:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiggsBoson View Post
I've just recently started experimenting with Himilayan rock salt and celtic sea salt, It seems perfectly logical to me but others seem to think I'll overdose the plants with salt, I'm a bit weird so I tend to listen to results more than doubting thomases.
I think you should wait one or two years after continuous use before you draw conclusion. The reason for why NPK look promising because it fertilize the land for 1 or two years before the imbalance cause the land to dry dead. Getting good result on the first year is not always a good sign.


There are herbal pesticide made from fruit juice in case pesticide needed.

Agree that healthy plant need much less intervention from us. I only put copper vortex maker on the water hose and after a year now, there is no sick flower anymore. Live better than neighboor garden that use NPK and other chemical.
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Old 03-03-2010, 05:18 AM
HiggsBoson HiggsBoson is offline
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Good point sucahyo
Things do take time to show any problems thats why I've started my experiments in a closed hydroponic system with a growing medium of coir (cocpeat) mixed with rock dust and sand.
I only use a very weak solution of sea salt approx. 1/2 what's recommended, and use a weekly dose of Actively Aerated Compost Tea.
There no signs of deficiency as of yet and I have eathworms growing in a filter box on the catchment side of the system.
If the worms die I will suspect a build up of salt.
It's only 4 months old but the worms are multiplying very well.
My hope is to make a simple system that is cheap and does not require expensive test equipment.
The sea salt (soul) solution is more of a trace element boost than the primary source of nutrient.
But as you said time will tell.
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Old 05-01-2010, 06:18 PM
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Which Rock Dust.

I was recommended this rock dust.

Glacial Rock Dust (50 lb)


20 dollars for the dust, and 35.00 for shipping so 55 dollars for for 50 lbs of rock dust.

My target is to aid the bacteria in my compost heap and to help feed the two worm bins I have setup. I am thinking since I don't intend on building a huge garden but do self watering containers this should last me for some time.

I guess I have heard it works well, but wanted to get others feed back on this.

Also Aaron, do you use silver with your solid state bedini to make a pesitcide? I am thinking of using compost tea to spray on the plants from the earthworm castings..

Cheers!
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Old 05-01-2010, 09:55 PM
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soil fertilization

That dust looks like a good product. Just depends on what you want to pay.
If there are local gravel pits, they may just give you some fine mesh gravel
screenings for free. I haven't tried this myself but have read that others
have tried it.

I'm looking at doing a worm bin next or just putting them right on my garden.
Someone at a popular earthworm farm I talked to said they'd just go deeper
when it is cold enough and will surface when it warms up. My concern was
killing them off from the cold winter temps.

They can also double in population in 3-6 months. 10 worms per square
foot is what he recommended. I found some 1 pound containers of worms
for around $21-25 - should have about 1000 worms in a pound - the skinny
red wigglers. Not sure if I'll go with those or the larger ones that are about
250 per pound.
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Old 05-02-2010, 03:42 AM
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RE: Rock Dust

Thanks Aaron,

I am just looking for a proven source. I guess the goal is to get minerals to our body that we can digest and use. I am wondering why fight so hard to get it into the soil then into our bodies? Why not just buy the organic minerals that are easy to absorb and eat them and be done with it, along with eating the right types of food that complement them.


Advice on buying your worms, I just got a pound of worms and one thing you want to think about is the heat. Worms can die a quick death in extreme heat so you might want to choose a seller that is close to you.

From what I have read they continue to multiply till they fill the capacity of your container, know thing i have divided the worms into two bins and hope to have the doubling effect in 3 months. I am learning much about what is too much water, and fruit flies can be a problem, but slowly I am getting past these problems.

If I was to put these worms outside they would die quickly as all the soil is sand, they would dry out about instantly, then the army of fire ants would have a feast.

Anyhow, they have survived me for about 3 weeks now and slowly I am getting better of taking care of them, I have found they LOVE cardboard and do have a fair sized appetite.

Anyhow, thanks for the input Aaron.
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Old 05-02-2010, 06:37 AM
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worms, minerals

Hi Mart,

Liquid Ionic minerals are the most absorbable. I used to own a health food
store and sold a lot of just about every supplement imaginable. I actually
told my customers they didn't need any of my supplements if they ate food
that had the right nutrition to begin with. Lack of minerals in the food are
probably the #1 problem with empty food in this country at least. Americans
probably are the most malnourished people in the world for the amount of
food they eat - simply no minerals in the food.

Consuming minerals in food with the natural ratios of vitamins, enzymes, etc...
that come along with it is how nature intends us to ingest minerals instead
of from supplements.

It isn't that hard to put it in soil.

10 tons of rock dust per acre of farmland is good for 10-15 years without
ever needing to add any other "fertilizer". It can be done 1 ton per acre
that lasts 1-2 years at a time so depends on how much you want to
put up ahead of time. Of course that can be broken down to smaller plots
like my garden is about 4-5 feet wide and about 20 feet long.

My regular soil is very very sandy. However, I have added quite a bit
of compost, bat guano, etc... over the last couple years including sea agri,
rock dust, biochar, etc... and it holds water much better than the rest of
my non-garden soil. I'll probably put 1/2 the worms on my garden anyway
and just make sure it is moist enough and the other half, I might use on
a 3 tray kitchen bin system for kitchen produce scraps.

I would hope the companies would honor their guarantee on "live" worms
when they arrive. There are few a couple hundred miles away but is
probably a good idea to order nearby.

Do you have any details on your worm bins? I've been looking more into
the mini-worm farm concept for the last few months but haven't settled
on anything yet. I also need the worms in the actual garden to help
carry the biochar/fungus/etc... deeper into the soil just like the terra preta.
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  #25  
Old 05-02-2010, 11:51 AM
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theremart theremart is offline
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RE: worm bins.

I have been watching hours of videos on youtube picking out ideas for worm bins.

Google for this document, it seems like an awesome guide for picking the right food / conditions for worms.

Vermiculture_FarmersManual_gm.pdf


I used this method of creating my bins, it was cheap fast and easy.

YouTube - Setting Up a Basic Worm Bin

I would change only to add plenty more holes, I used the 1/8th in drill bit on mine and doubled the amount of holes. I also picked up some garden lime to help with balancing the ph of the bin.

I am still a newbie at this, but so far the worms are dong good. I have a fruit fly problem but I am gaining ground on that as I took a fruit fly trap I found on a worm bin site, all you do is take a banana peal and put it in a small zip lock bag. Then take like an 1/8 th inch drill bit and poke holes about 1/3 the way down the bag. Remove all other items that the fruit fly may be attracted to as you can in the room ( just put your fruit in the fridge ) then put this bag out. The fruit flies love bananas and will be find their way into the small holes. I also have used vinegar in times past, but bananas seem to be their favorite.

Cheers!

P.S. I just found this site.

DIY Worm Bin - Finish it - vermicomposters.com

The tip on air is very important I think I will be doing this mod to my bin.
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Last edited by theremart; 05-02-2010 at 12:12 PM.
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  #26  
Old 05-02-2010, 08:50 PM
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Aaron Aaron is offline
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worms

Thanks Mart for the doc - looks like a good one, just what I need!

I'll check out the vids.
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  #27  
Old 05-04-2010, 06:45 PM
jeanna jeanna is offline
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east coast - west coast

Hi Mart,

I know you are in the south on the east coast, and I also once lived on the east coast, and I would like to add that you have soil that is naturally very high in minerals and nutrients.
It is necessary to have the minerals added out here on the west coast, because the soil is not as full of minerals here.

I have no numbers to cite, but basically the soil east of the appalachians is about 24 feet deep and full of sea bed minerals. There is a lot of iodine in the soil and of course calcium and magnesium.
It might be worth while paying for the test or at least researching the tests.

I just know most of the soils in the interior are depleted by farming practices and the soils out west were never very good to begin with.

My bet is that your worms will love it (if you can keep them from cooking) and your worm compost will be wonderful and very full of minerals.

jeanna

P.S. If you do any testing, I would love to know the results!
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Last edited by jeanna; 05-11-2010 at 01:25 AM. Reason: change the word land to soil
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  #28  
Old 05-06-2010, 01:20 PM
Savvypro Savvypro is offline
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Removing the salt from sea salt

When I was looking in to the sea minerals area, I cam across an article about a guy in Australia, who became interested in the work of Maynard Murray after reading Sea Energy Agriculture (<-- this last bit (reading the book) may not be 100% correct, as I'm quoting from memory and not from my notes).

Anyway, in the article - he stated that he had setup a plant located near a remote area of the great barrier reef (I'm guessing that he meant remote from contamination by humans/industry/waste etc.).

The plant was used to process and pack the sea minerals (which were still in liquid form), after they had been removed from the collection and evaporation pools.

He stated that the sea water was collected in one pool, where it would stay for a short period of time - during it’s stay the solution would concentrate naturally via evaporation using sun light. After the first phase, the solution would be moved (pumped) to another pool where it would concentrate even more via evaporation, before going into the plant to be processed and packed.


The section that I found very interesting was also one of the vaguest. The guy who the article was about, stated in response to a question about the salt contents of his products. That during the concentrate process (via natural evaporation, using sun light), the solution would get to a point where the salt content could be removed and the concentration would be lowered to about 2% of the solution.

Thinking about it now, it seams the process may be similar to one I saw during a documentary, which had a section on how the Romans extracted sea salt on the East cost of England.

The process shown on the show used a very little terracotta tub (scaled down to about 10 cm long) which was filled with sea water, sunlight was used to heat up the water. But a fire would have been used, as the Romans mass extracted the salt year round - I think they used sun light because they couldn’t get permission to light a fire to do the experiment where they were filming.

As they were filming salt began to form on the surface of the water, the presenter would use small wooden spoon to scoop up the crystals and place them in a small tub. Because of the way they did the experiment, it took a long time to collect what looked like a couple of grams of salt - thankfully they edited out the waiting around.


Anyone know if the solar evaporation method I described above could be used to reduce the amount of Sodium chloride in the sea water.

If it would, than it could be the solution to the problem of using straight sea water to “water” plants.
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:23 PM
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Aaron Aaron is offline
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Sea Agri

Straight seawater has done wonders for farms that got flooded by
the ocean. Usually, everyone thought it would damage everything but the
following year after sea water floods, they had the biggest crops ever.

There is a company that sells mineral additives for agriculture that comes
from sea water and I have added a few pounds to my plot:
SeaAgri

It will do the same as rock dust but is more concentrated so less is needed
per acre but of course the cost is a bit higher per amount.

I posted some other info on sea agri in this agriculture forum somewhere.
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Old 05-08-2010, 03:32 PM
Savvypro Savvypro is offline
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I should clarify the basis of my question.

Using sea minerals like SeaAgri (which are "mined" at the same location Maynard Murray collected his supply from), is OK for occasional use (as in yearly use).

But when you start using them on a continuous basis - for example using straight sea water as a substitute for fresh water. In areas where there is no fresh water or access to a desalination plant.

From what I've read, about experiments which have been done to find crops that can be grown in sea water. Normal crops will grow fine for a bit. But then will be killed off because of salt saturation. The experiments tend to focus on finding species similar to the normal farmed crops, but are naturally found in areas with high salt content (e.g. found wild by the coast).

Reducing the salt content down to 2% would make a lot of difference when it come to growing normal crops in sea water.


On a different note:

The company I mentioned in my previous post is seamineral.com
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Last edited by Savvypro; 05-08-2010 at 04:13 PM.
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