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Agriculture Organic farming, remineralization, rock dust, biochar, soil micro organisms and other discussion relating to soil, water and food.

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  #31  
Old 05-08-2010, 03:54 PM
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sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvypro View Post
Anyone know if the solar evaporation method I described above could be used to reduce the amount of Sodium chloride in the sea water.

If it would, than it could be the solution to the problem of using straight sea water to “water” plants.
Isn't that white gold of David Hudson?

Isn't salt is NaCl and not KCL?

I wonder if electrolysis can help reduce NaCl, I think it would release a lot of Cl2 (dangerous nerve gas) thus leave behind NaOH.H2O which is a base. Then reducing the base according to david hudson way.
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  #32  
Old 05-08-2010, 04:20 PM
Savvypro Savvypro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Isn't that white gold of David Hudson?

Isn't salt is NaCl and not KCL?

I wonder if electrolysis can help reduce NaCl, I think it would release a lot of Cl2 (dangerous nerve gas) thus leave behind NaOH.H2O which is a base. Then reducing the base according to david hudson way.
NaCl = Sodium chloride = what people commonly refert to as salt (that you put on your food).

I'm not sure about using electrolysis, to reduce the "salt" content. Could work, but it's not the natural method I'm looking for.
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  #33  
Old 05-08-2010, 08:49 PM
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RE: Minerals

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanna View Post
Hi Mart,

I know you are in the south on the east coast, and I also once lived on the east coast, and I would like to add that you have soil that is naturally very high in minerals and nutrients.
It is necessary to have the minerals added out here on the west coast, because the soil is not as full of minerals here.

I have no numbers to cite, but basically the land east of the appalachians is about 24 feet deep and full of sea bed minerals. There is a lot of iodine in the soil and of course calcium and magnesium.
It might be worth while paying for the test or at least researching the tests.

I just know most of the soils in the interior are depleted by farming practices and the soils out west were never very good to begin with.

My bet is that your worms will love it (if you can keep them from cooking) and your worm compost will be wonderful and very full of minerals.

jeanna

P.S. If you do any testing, I would love to know the results!
Hi,

I ordered the 50 Lb bag of glacial minerals and it came today. My first target is to combine some hydrogen peroxide with a little bit of sugar with some compost in a bag then toss in some minerals, then let that brew with a bubbler for about 24 hours. So far the worm compost has done excellent. To insure I get the minerals I have gone with goat whey minerals as a supplement.

I have heard that the minerals act like a catalyst for the bacteria in the compost heap think I will try mixing some in my next self watering containers and do a dusting on top of the ones I have now.

In my newest video I have tried to change the PH of water to acidic but the results were poor. I am thinking I shoud not of used standard table salt I should of used sea salt, which is an excellent source of minerals. Think I will try it again with a clean batch of water and sea salt.

Cheers!

Mart


P.S

I am in northern center of Florida.
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  #34  
Old 05-09-2010, 12:02 AM
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bumper crops

Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvypro View Post
From what I've read, about experiments which have been done to find crops that can be grown in sea water. Normal crops will grow fine for a bit. But then will be killed off because of salt saturation.
The info that I came across wasn't about experiments but about natural
flooding from the ocean that didn't happen very often at all. The crops that
grew afterward didn't just grow fine, they were "bumper" crops
in their words.

I posted those references somewhere in this ag forum.

Probably if those areas flooded on a regular basis, there may be too much
build up but the results were spectacular from the floods that were
reported.
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  #35  
Old 05-09-2010, 12:06 AM
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salt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvypro View Post
NaCl = Sodium chloride = what people commonly refert to as salt (that you put on your food).

I'm not sure about using electrolysis, to reduce the "salt" content. Could work, but it's not the natural method I'm looking for.
The stuff that most people put on their food I wouldn't call salt.
It is a sodium chloride extract, which doesn't have any of the other
minerals or trace minerals. Salt, literally should have 74+ minerals and
trace minerals.

Sodium chloride extract with dextrose and other anti-caking agents, etc...
causes cancer and a bunch of other problems.

I like Celtic salt as a preference but usually use Real Salt.
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  #36  
Old 05-09-2010, 02:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvypro View Post
From what I've read, about experiments which have been done to find crops that can be grown in sea water. Normal crops will grow fine for a bit. But then will be killed off because of salt saturation. The experiments tend to focus on finding species similar to the normal farmed crops, but are naturally found in areas with high salt content (e.g. found wild by the coast).
This made me think:
- do charging the earth will help reduce salt saturation?
- do utilizing earth electricity increase salt saturation

If first is true then we can restore salted land by electrolizing. Maybe with radiant charger since it would allow automatic voltage from 2000V to 0.1V depend on earth resistance.

If the second is true then we are doing bad thing if we tap the electricity
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  #37  
Old 05-21-2010, 10:03 AM
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I just came accross the following article and thought about this thread.

The news article:

Quote:
Watering Tomato Plants With Diluted Seawater Boosts Levels Of Antioxidants

ScienceDaily (Apr. 29, 2008) — Watering tomatoes with diluted seawater can boost their content of disease-fighting antioxidants and may lead to healthier salads, appetizers, and other tomato-based foods, scientists in Italy report.

Besides their use in a variety of ethnic food dishes, tomatoes are one of the most commonly grown home garden vegetables, particularly cherry tomatoes. Scientists have linked tomatoes to several health benefits, including protection against prostate cancer and heart disease. Researchers have known for years that seawater does not stimulate the growth of tomatoes, but scientists know little about its effects on the nutritional content of the vegetables.

In the new study, Riccardo Izzo and colleagues grew cherry tomatoes in both freshwater and in a dilute solution of 12 percent seawater. They found that ripe tomatoes grown in the salty water showed higher levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, dihydrolipoic acid, and chlorogenic acid. All of these substances are antioxidants that appear to fight heart disease, cancer, aging, and other conditions. Using saltwater to irrigate tomato crops also appears to be a promising alternative to freshwater irrigation, especially in the wake of water shortages in some parts of the world, the researchers note.

The article "Irrigation with Diluted Seawater Improves the Nutritional Value of Cherry Tomatoes" is scheduled for the May 14 issue of ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Source: Watering Tomato Plants With Diluted Seawater Boosts Levels Of Antioxidants


The paper abstract:
Quote:
The aim of this study was to assess whether the nutritional value of cherry tomato can be improved by irrigating plants with diluted seawater (12%; EC = 10 mS/cm in comparison with a control at EC = 4 mS/cm). Berries of cherry tomato cv. Naomi were analyzed at the red-ripe stage for the contents of NADPH and NADP+ as well as for the amounts of the main antioxidants, such as ascorbic acid, lipoic acid, tocopherols, and phenolic acids. As compared to the controls, the fruits of salt-treated plants showed a higher titratable acidity and a higher concentration of reducing sugars. The fruits picked from tomato plants irrigated with diluted seawater produced berries characterized by a higher nutritional value. Following salinity, berries showed higher amounts of vitamin C, vitamin E, dihydrolipoic acid, and chlorogenic acid. It was hypothesized that protocatechuic, vanillic, caffeic, and ferulic acids were utilized to counteract the damaging effects of salinity-induced oxidative stress, allowing tomato fruits to maintain a high reduced status even following salinization.
Source: Irrigation with Diluted Seawater Improves the Nutritional Value of Cherry Tomatoes - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (ACS Publications)
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  #38  
Old 05-21-2010, 06:50 PM
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liquid ionic minerals diluted

Good find Savvy pro!

I have used this diluted to water plants for the same effect since it
comes from sea water. Liquid ionic minerals intended as a dietary supplement:
Amazon.com: Liqumins ConcenTrace Trace Mineral Drops, Low Sodium, 8-Ounce Bottle: Health & Personal Care

I use that exact brand from Concentrace - used to sell it in my health
food store.
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  #39  
Old 05-26-2010, 02:41 AM
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Mineralizing my gardens

On my ranch (S.Cal) the soil is alkali with ph levels ranging between 7-9 I till in Ag sulfur to help with the ph, but this doesn't help with available minerals.
I keep goats and will soon be adding chickens to the mix, the goats keep a steady supply of manure (poop and wasted alfalfa) going to the compost heap, this with the weeds and trimmings from the gardens and a little of my neighbors horse poop makes for some pretty good compost, still mineral challenged.
Every month or so my lady friend and I take the truck and head for a day at the beach, we spend the day gathering up the kelp (sea weed) that has washed ashore usually 3-4 trash bags full. At home we add this into the compost and turn it in, I'm sure this remedies the mineral problem, since we started this our gardens produce huge amounts of the best tasting fruits,veggies and berries and in bumper quantities.
I haven't had the soil mix tested and don't see a need to do so, but if you have an ocean within reach I suggest you gather the sea weed for your garden.

L&L
David
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  #40  
Old 05-26-2010, 12:03 PM
Savvypro Savvypro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarkus View Post
On my ranch (S.Cal) the soil is alkali with ph levels ranging between 7-9 I till in Ag sulfur to help with the ph, but this doesn't help with available minerals.
I keep goats and will soon be adding chickens to the mix, the goats keep a steady supply of manure (poop and wasted alfalfa) going to the compost heap, this with the weeds and trimmings from the gardens and a little of my neighbors horse poop makes for some pretty good compost, still mineral challenged.
Every month or so my lady friend and I take the truck and head for a day at the beach, we spend the day gathering up the kelp (sea weed) that has washed ashore usually 3-4 trash bags full. At home we add this into the compost and turn it in, I'm sure this remedies the mineral problem, since we started this our gardens produce huge amounts of the best tasting fruits,veggies and berries and in bumper quantities.
I haven't had the soil mix tested and don't see a need to do so, but if you have an ocean within reach I suggest you gather the sea weed for your garden.

L&L
David
David,

For info: Kelp contains something like 62 different minerals - I've seen some sites quote up to 90 minerals, but from the info I’ve seen on sonic bloom I’ve only seen 62 minerals.

The way it’s used sure does get results.
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Last edited by Savvypro; 05-26-2010 at 12:13 PM.
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  #41  
Old 05-26-2010, 08:44 PM
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seaweed

David,

That is a GREAT idea!

I hope it will be a good way to do it for a long time. If they don't
stop that "oil spill" in the gulf, in 18 months it could make its way to every
major beach on the planet.
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  #42  
Old 04-26-2011, 07:53 PM
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Post From Chernobyl to Japan: Treating Radiation Sickness with Rock Dust

Quote:
“Remineralization protects not only soil and plants from radioactivity,
but humans, too. Supplying abundant minerals especially trace elements
to the human body improves radiation tolerance, immune system integrity
and radiation exposure recovery.”

-David Yarrow, 2006
From Chernobyl to Japan: Treating Radiation Sickness with Rock Dust
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  #43  
Old 04-26-2011, 08:02 PM
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concentrace minerals

I found that out too. Might be hard for people to find properly
mineralized food unless they grow it themselves. In the meantime
they can use real salt and supplement even more with purified
desalinated sea water trace minerals like Concentrace.

I've used this type of mineral supplement for about 15 years
and it is superior to any other type of mineral supplement -
all in perfect ionic form. About 75+ or so minerals and trace
minerals. One bottle like that lasts one person about 3 months
so around $5/month. 20 drops per day for average adult use.
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  #44  
Old 05-02-2011, 02:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvypro View Post
www.seacrop.com Arthur Zeigler has it figured out.
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  #45  
Old 05-07-2011, 01:24 AM
Vortex Vortex is offline
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a thought

a poor man's rock dust / mineral source could be found at the side
of the road at any road intersection ?

i was lacking sand and didn't wish to purchase a bag of it..
so i thought i'd go sweep up some from the road side at the intersection ...
hmmmm, this stuff is dusty and mostly rock (some glass) ..
i double-sifted it and i think it has potential.

1st sift large rocks, etc. out.
the second sifting resulted in about 4-8 sand grain sized pebbles and
the dusty dirt / rock smaller than those.

the 4-8 grain size should be good for fungi to break down for feeding minerals to the plants as well.
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  #46  
Old 05-07-2011, 01:33 AM
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rock dust

Vortex,

You can go to gravel pits and ask for some fine mesh screenings.
Should be able to get some at little to nothing, especially if you just want
enough for a garden.
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  #47  
Old 03-27-2014, 02:33 PM
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Lava Rock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
Rock dust seems to be the #1 most effective soil remineralization ingredient.
This link has a lot of resources for this particular concept:
The Survival of Civilization by John Hamaker & Donald Weaver

Also, sea minerals seem to be a runner up to the rock dust concept such as:
SeaAgri

The downfall I see using the sea sourced minerals is that is will too easily wash away if you want to apply it for long term use. The rock dust if applied in amounts of 10 tons per acre at a cost of material (transport not included) is about $8 to $80 for 10 tons and that will stay in the soil for 10-20 years...imagine applying once and not needing to add any fertilizer or anything to the soil for 10-20 years!


I have been using lava rock in my herbs for the last few years. Lava is readily available at many garden centers. I fill a plastic container with water and the rocks, shake them hard and pour out the pink mineral filled water. You can do this over and over with the same rocks. You can also put a few in your flower pots and let the rain wash it in. That is all the fertilizer used on my plants.

Had been thinking about rock dust in the past. Since a neighbor and friend owns a concrete plant it should be easy enough for me to get them for our farm. Thanks for reminding me.

EDIT [I find that the sea solids can be applied to soil and is good for at least 5 years]. Much more expensive per ton, but less needed per acreage.

The soil micro organisms are protein based and consume necessary minerals and trace minerals for proper enzyme function. Without these minerals, the soil becomes lifeless and any food grown is very "empty."

Any discussion on these concepts is welcome and appreciated.
I have been using lava rock in my herbs for the last few years. Lava is readily available at many garden centers. I fill a plastic container with water and the rocks, shake them hard and pour out the pink mineral filled water. You can do this over and over with the same rocks. You can also put a few in your flower pots and let the rain wash it in. That is all the fertilizer used on my plants.

Had been thinking about rock dust in the past. Since a neighbor and friend owns a concrete plant it should be easy enough for me to get them for our farm. Thanks for reminding me.
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  #48  
Old 05-08-2014, 11:30 AM
Bobbyd Bobbyd is offline
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lava rock

I used to throw a bucket full of volcanic rocks in a cement mixer with some water and let it spin for about half an hour then tip the water in to a bucket to put on the garden and simply tip more water into the mixer for another batch of mineral rich water.
Now a friend makes and sells it commercially.
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