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Old 11-06-2009, 02:54 PM
jibbguy jibbguy is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 987
Thanks for that link Nenadalic84, those are great vids

I know exactly what he is talking about in #6 when he gave an anecdote of what happens when large longitudinal pulses are produced in a manufacturing environment.

This is a major application for test and measurement instruments, to capture and analyze transients that sometimes accidentally cause these longitudinal waves (...using the "Pre-Trigger" feature to store the event, which allows the continual storing of all signal data, but only actually writes it to disk when the trigger occurs; which allows showing what led-up to the trigger event, which is the real data of interest to troubleshooters).

Computers and heavily shielded controllers 100 meters away on totally separate grounds can crash / reset, as well as the office's phone system even farther away.

I've been on site training & helping Customers in steel, aluminum, and paper mills & other high-current conveyor lines set up their newly-purchased Data Acquisition equipment to troubleshoot these issues; and have seen it happen myself multiple times. It DOES commonly occur, especially with the older SCR drives... Despite the copper-tops whining about it being "impossible", lol. These days, Variable F drives are replacing the SCR's so it's less commonly seen. Every time it happened at different factories & mills that i know of (at least 8), SCR drives were involved.

This is one of the reasons i first started studying these subjects, because i knew that conventional electrical theory was B-S .

There is no way to explain these "transient" problems with conventional transverse wave EM theory: The totally separate grounds and proper shielding against EMF eliminates that from consideration... So what is left?

Tesla knew, and so does Eric Dollard

It's a criminal shame this has been kept from us for over 100 years. And it is criminal what they have done to Mr. Dollard as well.

BTW: He is completely correct about EMF causing cataracts. I had them very bad at age "42", and several other folks in electronics i know have them as well, at much too young an age. Instances of cataracts are up over 300% in the last 30 years. If you suspect you might have them, go to a microscope and look into the eyepiece. If you see a mass that looks like a hair ball, or an amoeba, reflected back, then you probably do. Modern surgery to replace the lens is a quick out-patient procedure these days. I've heard rumors of non-invasive means to cure them; but from what i was told before, it is "impossible" to restore the natural lenses, lol. You had better have insurance though: It is about $10,000 an eye.

Maybe we should make G.E. or Verizon or AT&T pay, hey?
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