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Old 12-20-2017, 07:42 AM
yasoooo yasoooo is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 540
Israel fears “delegitimization” more than anything else. Behind the velvet curtain lies a state built on myths and narratives, protected only by a military behemoth, billions of dollars in US assistance and a lone UN Security Council veto. Nothing else stands between the state and its dismantlement. Without these three things, Israelis would not live in an entity that has come to be known as the “least safe place for Jews in the world.”

Strip away the spin and the gloss, and you quickly realize that Israel doesn’t even have the basics of a normal state. , it doesn’t have borders. After six decades, it has never been more isolated. Over half a century later, and it needs a gargantuan military just to stop Palestinians from walking home.

Israel is a failed experiment. It is on life-support – pull those three plugs and it is a cadaver, living only in the minds of some seriously deluded foreigners who thought they could pull off the heist of the century.
The Jews will return slaves again later
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGranCaqjlI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6J5zSQi8Wk

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The Quran uses the word ‘We’ when quoting Allah. Does that mean that Muslims believe in more than one God?
Islam adheres to uncompromising monotheism. It teaches that God is One and indivisible. In the Quran, God often refers to Himself as "We". But it does not mean that there is more than one God. The reference of God to Himself as "We" in many Quranic verses is necessarily understood in the Arabic language to denote power and grandeur, as opposed to the more intimate singular form, "I", used in specific instances.
In some languages there are two types of plural form. One is related to quantity and used to refer to two or more persons, places or things. The other kind of plural is one of majesty, power and distinction. For example, in proper English, the Queen of England refers to herself as ‘we’. This is known as the ‘royal plural’. Rajeev Gandhi, the ex-Prime Minister of India used to say in Hindi, "Hum dekhna chahte hain". "We want to see." ‘Hum’ means ‘we’, which is again a royal plural in Hindi language. Similarly, when God refers to Himself in the Quran, He sometimes uses the Arabic word 'nahnu', meaning ‘We’. It does not indicate a plurality of number but the plurality of power and majesty.
The oneness of God is stressed throughout the Quran. A clear example is in this short chapter “Say: He is Allah, the One and Only; Allah, the Eternal, Absolute; He begetteth not, nor is He begotten; And there is none like unto Him.” (Quran 112:1-4)


Catholic from Equador Converts to Islam | TEARFUL ENDING | 'LIVE'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3qG9LiIZqY
كيف عثرتُ على الإسلام - آنتوني (عبد الرحيم) غرين
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhcCt8AgpPk



نصيحة من مسلم جديد: إسلامك أخلاقك - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KhzVuywVZmk
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