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Old 06-10-2016, 10:41 PM
frisco kid frisco kid is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 230
https://www.azmag.gov/Documents/Reco...uffocation.pdf

As has been the case for several years, KJ's death was homicidal in nature. Vomiting and blood red eyes are also common in cases of strangulation. KJ put up a very intense struggle, which produced these revealing results in death.

Strangulation is classified as hanging, manual, and ligature. KJ meets 5 of 7 symptoms listed below.

-Face was congested
-Tongue was bitten
-Neck muscles showed signs of trauma
-Multiple abrasions and contusions on chin,
-both arms, and abdomen suggesting a
struggle

Horizontal ligature mark below the thyroid
cartilage
Tracheal rings were fractured





Suffocation-Smothering | Forensic Pathology Online bite tongue

https://www.wisconsinmedicalsociety....f/102/3/41.pdf bit ear

Throttling | Forensic Pathology Online karate blow

http://www.napsa-now.org/wp-content/...012/11/102.pdf

If the strangulation results in obstruction
of Carotid Artery
• No petechiae
• Blunt force injury within the artery to prove
strangulation

Was there any vomiting?

http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?pid=...pt=sci_arttext

http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3448300444.html

If petechial hemorrhages and facial congestion are present, it is a strong indication of asphyxia by strangulation as the cause of death.

https://palliative.stanford.edu/tran...pending-death/ mottling

https://www.reference.com/health/mot...f6b62cb3149e54 """

Cardiac and Circulation Changes

Skin may become mottled and discolored. Mottling and cyanosis of the upper extremities appear to indicate impending death versus such changes in the lower extremities.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/152191-overview

The diagnosis of cardiogenic shock can sometimes be made at the bedside by observing the following:

Skin is usually ashen or cyanotic and cool; extremities are mottled

http://dhss.alaska.gov/ocs/Documents...20Brochure.pdf ms

http://gcfv.georgia.gov/sites/gcfv.g...on%20Cases.pdf """

http://journals.lww.com/amjforensicm...Unusual.1.aspx upside down

https://books.google.com/books?id=bP...lation&f=false swollen

https://books.google.com/books?id=w3...lation&f=false """ great page

https://books.google.com/books?id=V4...lation&f=false GP

https://books.google.com/books?id=s8...lation&f=false read

https://www.vice.com/read/postmortem-0000449-v21n9 death investigator

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/evi...-is-1-the.html slippage/ moved body

http://www.evidencemagazine.com/inde...sk=view&id=430

Skin slippage—By four to seven days, or sometimes as early as two to three days, skin slippage may be apparent anywhere on the body. The skin, including the fingernails and toenails, loosens and allows removal of the skin in its entirety, much like the removal of a sock or glove. This may be most notable on the hands and feet. The entire scalp, including the hair, will become partially or completely detached.

An on-scene body-assessment checklist will allow the investigator to record observations made during the assessment and accurately document injuries by using the appropriate supplement form. (On-scene body-assessment forms can be obtained from Water-Related Death Investigation: Practical Methods and Forensic Applications, Appendix C.)

https://books.google.com/books?id=oN...0occur&f=false sl

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/rea...fb9775041fb243

Skin slippage is something that happens in decomposition. It is when the superficial layers of the skin “slip” off of the body. It occurs early in decomposition, in temperate conditions usually it starts around the two to three day mark and its appearance can be varied. Usually it starts as a formation of what looks like a blister, then when the roof of the blister ruptures the skin then flops off the body. it can make the body surface that is left very slimy to the touch.

Skin slippage happens at any point when there’s contact with the body, whether it be someone physically moving the body or something in the environment contacting the body.

http://oureverydaylife.com/stages-hu...ess-37600.html decomp

https://books.google.com/books?id=rd...0moved&f=false lividity/stab wound
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Last edited by frisco kid; 06-26-2016 at 06:05 PM.
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