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Old 10-11-2015, 06:09 PM
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BroMikey BroMikey is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2013
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Collecting Gleaned Nuggets, It could be bent at the end of the repulsion
UFO!!!



Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMack View Post

The first step is finished. You can balance the magnets as needed.
We are at the second step, developing the ramp for the attraction magnets, without the repelling set.
After that comes the ramp for the repelling magnets, without the attraction set.
At this point you can determine the best rotor diameter.
Then, combine the action of the two ramps as a pair on the stator.
After that comes modifying the magnetic fields with shunts to assist rotation.
Then you will know exactly how to build the motor.


think about the magnetic flux involved between the rotor magnet, ramp, and stator magnet. Picture the flow of the flux in all directions as the rotor magnet passes along the ramp, it always takes the path of least resistance. We want the rotor flux to transition between straight attraction to the ramp, then angle off to both sides smoothly while providing the least amount of back pull. As the rotor magnet gets closer to the stator magnet the flux will transition to an attraction mostly between the magnets and this is where the ends of the ramp need to lose their influence on the rotor magnet.



Mack

Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMack View Post
Guys, I'm sorry I can't post as often or as in-depth as I would like.

Ufo, my ramp pivot was nothing like the bell shape you posted ..................



...... I described could be called a Y with the stator magnet in the V. Don't be so much concerned about which branch has what polarity, but more about where are the attraction and repulsion forces and the direction they have. There will be some back drag as the split in the ramp widens and this needs to be compensated for as best as can be. It might help to picture the ramp as more like a scorpion, with a shorter tail sticking up, a hump backed body with the rear end elevated, and claws extended ahead. Looking at it from the top, the body and claws would resemble a Y shaped tuning fork. The fork tines would be parallel just before the stator magnet, giving the rotor magnet attraction or repulsion vectors to the ramp of 90 degrees to the direction of rotation. As the rotor magnet gets to the stator magnet there is nothing but air between the two.

I would like to point out that I have said nothing about the shape of the very ends of the ramp at the stator magnet, where the ends terminate, nor the various degrees of slope and rotor magnet clearance the ramp may have along it's length.

Regards,
Mack



Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMack View Post

I guess my ability to convey a design with words leaves a lot to be desired so from here on I will use drawings. Look at this one, it accurately shows the angle of the fork tines. It does not show the reduction in cross section or the ends of the fork tines. The angle of the upward bend at the left of the fork isn't exact either.

In the top view, the rotor magnet (dashed lines) at this point of rotation will be strongly attracted by the stator magnet. From this point onward is where the rotor's attraction to the ramp should be diminishing and where the cross section of the forks will be decreasing. By the time the two magnets are aligned we want the attraction to be between the two magnets with as little as possible left between the rotor magnet & ramp. How well this is accomplished has a great affect on the performance.

Regards,
Mack
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