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Old 09-11-2015, 04:08 PM
frisco kid frisco kid is offline
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modifying clause can be either restrictive or nonrestrictive.
Grammar Handbook Writers Workshop: Writer Resources The Center for Writing Studies, Illinois
Restrictive Clause

A restrictive modifying clause (or essential clause) is an adjective clause that is essential to the meaning of a sentence because it limits the thing it refers to. The meaning of the sentence would change if the clause were deleted. Because restrictive clauses are essential, they are not set off by commas.

All students who do their work should pass easily.

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.

The car that I want is out of my price range.
The gas company will discontinue our service unless we pay our bills by Friday.

Nonrestrictive Clauses

A nonrestrictive modifying clause (or nonessential clause) is an adjective clause that adds extra or nonessential information to a sentence. The meaning of the sentence would not change if the clause were to be omitted. Nonrestrictive modifying clauses are usually set off by commas. The bolded parts can be left out.

Edgar Allan Poe, who wrote "The Raven," is a great American poet.
Puerto Rico was a Spanish colony until 1898, when it was ceded to the United States.

Non-restrictive example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-restrictive_clause

The officer helped the civilians, who had been shot.

Here, there is a comma before "who". Therefore, what follows is a non-restrictive clause. It changes the sentence to mean that all the civilians had been shot.[1]

A restrictive clause is never placed between punctuation. Using That and Which is All About Restrictive and Non-restrictive Clauses | Grammarly Blog

Remember: if your sentence needs it, then you’ve written a restrictive clause, and you should use that. If the clause gives a little extra, unnecessary information, then you’ve written a nonrestrictive clause, and you should use which.

SIGNUP: The Basics of Writing Complex Sentences: Using Adjective Clauses

Understanding the Complex Sentence Structure

A complex sentence has a special way in which it is created. An independent clause in a complex sentence is joined by one or more dependent clauses. A complex sentence must also always have a conjunction such as since, after, although, when, or because. A relative pronoun, such as that, which, or who, can replace a conjunction in a sentence. When a complex sentence starts with a conjunction, it is important to remember that a comma must be placed at the end of the dependent clause. A comma should not be placed before a conjunction if it appears in the middle of the sentence.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...Ixjcu1xcy46iiQ


This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, but will include every other class of persons.
This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are aliens, but will include every other class of persons.

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who belong to the families of ambassadors accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.
This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who belong to the families of foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.
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Last edited by frisco kid; 09-20-2015 at 04:54 PM.
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