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Old 09-03-2015, 03:36 PM
frisco kid frisco kid is online now
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Restrictive Relative Clause Restrictive, Nonrestrictive Clauses - Writing Explained

A restrictive/essential clause is essential to the meaning of the sentence element that it modifies or identifies. Who are foreigners, aliens identifies the 'persons born in the United States.' In other words, without this clause or phrase the sentence as a whole would not carry the same meaning. Restrictive clauses should not be set off by commas. For example:

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States WHO ARE FOREIGNERS, ALIENS,

Nonrestrictive Relative Clause

A nonrestrictive/nonessential clause is a clause that does not limit the essential meaning of the element that it modifies. This means that children of foreign diplomats is not the only class of persons excluded from auto-citizenship. In other words, if this clause or phrase were to be taken out of the sentence, the essential meaning behind the sentence would stay the same. Nonrestrictive clauses should be set off by commas in sentences. For example: Simply put, the second clause only adds extra information about the subject and (PERSONS born in the United States) predicate. It does not modify anything else in the context of this sentence.

This will not, of course, persons born in the United States, WHO BELONG TO THE FAMILIES OF AMBASSADORS OR FOREIGN MINISTERS ACCREDITED TO THE GOVERNMENTOF THE UNITED STATES, but will include every other class of persons.

Nonrestrictive: For camp the children need sturdy shoes, which are expensive.

A nonrestrictive element describes a noun (PERSONS) or pronoun whose meaning has already been clearly defined or limited. Because it contains nonessential or parenthetical information, a nonrestrictive element is set off with commas. If you remove a nonrestrictive element from a sentence, the meaning does not change significantly. The persons not included are foreigners or aliens, and those who belong to ambassadors or foreign ministers are two groups of people that fit into those categories.


Nonrestrictive Relative Clause Restrictive, Nonrestrictive Clauses - Writing Explained

A nonrestrictive/nonessential clause does not limit the essential meaning of the element that it modifies. This debunks the stupidity that it could limit the meaning of foreigners/aliens. It only applies to the subject/predicate; PERSONS born in the United States. In other words, if this clause were to be taken out of the sentence, the essential meaning behind the sentence would stay the same. Nonrestrictive clauses should be set off by commas in their sentences. For example: The following non-restrictive relative clause can be taken out, without losing any meaning to the sentence; , WHO BELONG TO THE FAMILIES OF AMBASSADORS OR FOREIGN MINISTERS ACCREDITED TO THE GOVERNMENTOF THE UNITED STATES,. The preceding clause does not limit or change anything. It just provides some extra information about the subject.

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners or aliens, but will include every other class of persons.

Restrictive Relative Clause

A restrictive/essential clause is essential to the meaning of the sentence element that it modifies or identifies. Who are foreigners, aliens identifies the 'persons born in the United States.' In other words, without this restrictive clause the sentence as a whole would not carry the same meaning. Restrictive clauses should not be set off by commas. A restrictive clause identifies the noun (PERSONS) or verb that precedes it and is needed to understand which person or thing is meant. For example:

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States WHO ARE FOREIGNERS, ALIENS,


Clauses: the Essential Building-Blocks

restrictive relative clause - definition and examples

The Difference Between Restrictive Clauses and Nonrestrictive Clauses

restrictive relative clause - definition and examples

"To make this as short and brutal an explanation as possible, think of a restrictive clause as a liver: a vital organ of the sentence that cannot be removed without killing it. A nonrestrictive clause, however, is more like the appendix or tonsils of a sentence: It may be desirable to have but can be removed without dying (so long as one does so carefully)."
(Ammon Shea, Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation. Perigee, 2014)


http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/clauses

Relative clause

A relative clause is one connected to a main clause by a word such as which, that, whom, whose, when, where, or who:


This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners or aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.


http://www.ello.uos.de/field.php/Syntax/TGRelC

Integrated (restrictive) relative: The relative provides information that helps identify the referent of the antecedent further.

Supplementary (appositive, non-restrictive) relative: Adds information on the antecedent that is not required to identify it.

https://english.lingolia.com/en/gram...lative-clauses


http://www.englishcorner.vacau.com/g...strrelcls.html

https://books.google.com/books?id=bJ...ntence&f=false

https://books.google.com/books?id=WC...ntence&f=false

https://books.google.com/books?id=y1...ntence&f=false

http://faculty.deanza.edu/flemingjohn/stories/storyReader$20

1. A restrictive adjective clause contains information that is necessary to identify the noun it modifies. If a restrictive adjective clause is removed from a sentence, the meaning of the main clause changes. A restrictive adjective clause is not separated from the main clause by a comma or commas. Most adjective clauses are restrictive; all of the examples of adjective clauses above are restrictive. Here is another example:

People who can’t swim should not jump into the ocean.

2. A nonrestrictive adjective clause gives additional information about the noun it modifies but is not necessary to identify that noun. If a nonrestrictive adjective clause is removed from a sentence, the meaning of the main clause does not change. A nonrestrictive adjective clause is separated from the main clause by a comma or commas. The relative pronoun that cannot be used in nonrestrictive adjective clauses. The relative pronoun cannot be omitted from a nonrestrictive clause. Here is an example:

http://your-book-editor.com/sentence...g-2/4582453585

That / which (restrictive/nonrestrictive clauses)—A nonrestrictive clause is not essential for the reader to understand the full meaning of the word or words that it modifies. It simply adds more information, describing but not limiting (“restricting”) what it modifies. Conversely, a restrictive clause contains information that is essential for the reader to understand the full meaning of the word or words that it modifies. It limits (“restricts”) what it modifies. To keep things simple, use the relative pronoun that to begin restrictive clauses and which to begin a nonrestrictive clause. Examples:

Restrictive:

He showed me the book that arrived in the mail today. [The meaning is restricted to just one book—the one that arrived in the mail today.]

http://www.englishgrammar.org/restri...ative-clauses/

Such a relative clause which defines or identifies its antecedent (the noun phrase) is called a defining or restrictive relative clause.

Restrictive relative clauses follow immediately after the noun that they modify. They are not separated by pauses in speech or commas in writing. Note that a restrictive relative clause cannot be left out without affecting the meaning of the sentence.

http://www.ello.uos.de/field.php/Syn...TGRelCNonrestr

Restrictive and nonrestrictive relative clauses have different functions. Nonrestrictive relative clauses cannot narrow down a set of entities to a smaller set, only restrictive relative clauses do so. In the restrictive relative clause Pablo Picasso is a specified person. In contrast, the man denotes the set of all men. The set must have more than one member to be narrowed down. A singular proper noun has only one referent. Therefore, restrictive relative clauses cannot be attached to singular proper nouns. Exception: A restrictive relative clause can modify a proper noun which is used as a common noun. (e.g. The Isabel Allende who is a writer, not the one that is a politician.)

1. * Pablo Picasso who was an artist is very famous today.

2. The man who was an artist is very famous today.

3. Pablo Picasso, who was an artist, is very famous today.
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Last edited by frisco kid; 04-03-2016 at 08:27 PM.
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