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Old 09-01-2015, 03:43 PM
frisco kid frisco kid is offline
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A restrictive clause is a clause which limits a subject; this might be something identifying, such as the colour of a person’s hair, or the position of a book on a table. A restrictive clause may use the word that, and cannot be removed from the sentence without loss of information.

The box of apples, that has the red label on it, can be used to make the pie.

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.

The restrictive clause that has the red label on it should not have a comma on either side of it. The label is required to identify the box.

Three years ago, the house, on the corner, was torn down.

The plants, that are wilting, need more water.




A non-restrictive clause is a clause which may offer more information, but doesn’t limit the subject; this might be something of interest, such as how old something is or a job a person has. A non-restrictive clause may use the word which and can be removed from the sentence without loss of understanding.

Non-restrictive clauses are generally separated from the rest of the sentence by commas (while restrictive clauses are not).

That box of apples, which I picked this morning, can be used to make the pie.

The non-restrictive clause which I picked this morning needs to have a comma on either side of it because this information is not required to identify the box; that is the word which identifies the box (we can assume the speaker is pointing to it).

Three years ago, the house on the corner, which was of historical interest, was torn down.

As the house is already identified as the one on the corner, the fact that it was of historical interest is not necessary.

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/645/01/

The most common relative pronouns are who/whom, whoever/whomever, whose, that, and which. (Please note that in certain situations, "what," "when," and "where" can function as relative pronouns.) Relative pronouns introduce relative clauses, which are a type of dependent clause. Relative clauses modify a word, phrase, or idea in the main clause. The word, phrase, or idea modified is called the antecedent. In the following examples, that and whom modify the subject:

The house that Jack built is large.

The professor, whom I respect, recently received tenure.

"That" vs. "Who" and "Which" https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/645/01/

The relative pronoun that can only be used in restrictive clauses. It can also be substituted for who (referring to persons) or which (referring to things) in informal English. Whereas that is often used while speaking, who and which are more common in formal written English.


Conversational, Informal: William Kellogg was the man that lived in the late nineteenth century and had some weird ideas about raising children.

Written, Formal: William Kellogg was the man who lived in the late nineteenth century and had some weird ideas about raising children.

Conversational, Informal: The café that sells the best coffee in town has recently been closed.

Written, Formal: The café, which sells the best coffee in town, has recently been closed.

However, when speaking about a particular person in formal language, who is preferred:

The old lady who lives next door is a teacher.

The girl who wore a red dress attracted everybody's attention at the party.

This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.

1. Relative pronouns introduce subordinate clauses functioning as adjectives.

The man who robbed us was never caught.
The arrow that has left the bow never returns.

In addition to introducing the clause, the relative pronoun, in this case
who, points back to a noun or pronoun that the clause modifies (man). In the second sentence, that points back to arrow.

https://www.butte.edu/departments/ca...structure.html

Grammar Bytes! :: The Subject Complement

Grammar Bytes! :: The Direct Object
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Last edited by frisco kid; 03-31-2018 at 05:45 PM.
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