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Old 04-04-2012, 01:28 PM
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results of research of the word Quartz on Physorg: PhysOrg.com Search - quartz

Viscous cycle: Quartz key to tectonics

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(PhysOrg.com) -- More than 40 years ago, pioneering tectonic geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson published an article in the journal Nature describing how, over Earth’s long history, ocean basins opened and closed along North America’s eastern seaboard. His observations, dubbed “The Wilson Tectonic Cycle,” suggested this process had occurred many times; most recently causing giant Pangaea to split into today’s seven continents.
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“It all begins with quartz,” says Lowry, who published results of the team’s recent study in the March 17, 2011 issue of Nature. In “The Role of Crustal Quartz in Controlling Cordilleran Deformation,” the scientists describe a new approach to measuring properties of the deep crust that reveal quartz’s key role in initiating the churning chain of events that cause the Earth’s surface to crack, wrinkle, fold and stretch into mountains, plains and valleys.

“Earthquakes, mountain-building and other expressions of continental tectonics depend fundamentally on how rocks flow in response to stress,” says Lowry, assistant professor in USU’s Department of Geology and 2010 recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. “We know that all tectonics are a response to the effects of gravity, but we know less about rock flow properties and how they change from one location to another.”
------------------------- the Pyrenee Mountains

Irikaitz archaeological site -- host to a 25,000-year-old pendant

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Irikaitz archaeological site -- host to a 25,000-year-old pendant
December 27, 2011

The recent discovery of a pendant at the Irikaitz archaeological site in Zestoa (in the Basque province of Gipuzkoa ) has given rise to intense debate: it may be as old as 25,000 years, which would make it the oldest found to date at open-air excavations throughout the whole of the Iberian Peninsula. This stone is nine centimetres long and has a hole for hanging it from the neck although it would seem that, apart from being adornment, it was used to sharpen tools. The discovery has had great repercussion, but it is not by any means the only one uncovered here by the team led by Álvaro Arrizabalaga: "Almost every year some archaeological artefact of great value is discovered; at times, even 8 or 10. It is a highly fruitful location".
---------------- remember Tesla's Ozone making circuit and the Earthquake Machine

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New research, published this week in the journal Applied Physics Letters, suggests that ozone gas emitted from fracturing rocks could serve as an indicator of impending earthquakes. Ozone is a natural gas, a byproduct of electrical discharges into the air from several sources, such as from lightning, or, according to the new research, from rocks breaking under pressure.

Scientists in the lab of Raúl A. Baragiola, a professor of engineering physics in the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science set up experiments to measure ozone produced by crushing or drilling into different igneous and metamorphic rocks, including granite, basalt, gneiss, rhyolite and quartz. Different rocks produced different amounts of ozone, with rhyolite producing the strongest ozone emission.
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To distinguish whether the ozone was coming from the rocks or from reactions in the atmosphere, the researchers conducted experiments in pure oxygen, nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide. They found that ozone was produced by fracturing rocks only in conditions containing oxygen atoms, such as air, carbon dioxide and pure oxygen molecules, indicating that it came from reactions in the gas. This suggests that rock fractures may be detectable by measuring ozone.
------------------------------------ see The Brain is an Advanced Fractal Antenna

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UV light controls antibodies, improves biosensors
October 31, 2011



One UV photon is absorbed by the antibody and the disulfide bridge is opened, thereby forming thiol groups. Their interaction with the gold surface leads to an oriented Fab region so that the upside down position (circled in the right side of the picture) is hampered and the antigen binding is more effective. Credit: Biomedical Optics Express

From detecting pathogens in blood samples to the study of protein synthesis, Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensors have many uses in modern biology. In this technique, antibodies anchored to gold electrodes on a piece of quartz crystal act like the "hooks" on the sticky side of a Velcro strap, grabbing molecules of interest as they pass by. The more molecule-sensing antibodies on the surface of the sensor, the more sensitive the QCM device's detection capabilities.
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